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Washington Technology Center Clients

Boeing

Seattle

http://www.boeing.com
RTD Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Pre-Repair Thermal Mapping and Leak Detection"

Research Partner: Professor Ashley Emery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington

Phase Began: 2009

The Boeing Company's Research & Technology group and HEATCON® Composite Systems, a Seattle-based composite repair equipment supplier, are collaborating with the University of Washington's Mechanical Engineering Department to improve the efficiency of composite-structural repairs.

UW will receive $75,190 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $20,000 from The Boeing Company for the project titled "Pre-Repair Thermal Mapping and Leak Detection."

The composite aircraft industry will be increasingly reliant on hot-bond composite repairs to keep its aircraft in service. In this project, the collaborative team of HEATCON®, Boeing and UW Professor Ashley Emery, will create a Pre-Repair Mapping System that assesses the thermal anomalies and vacuum leaks often associated with the repair of composite structures. Phase I will validate the viability of the system, while future phases will commercialize the system.

"We look forward to working with the University of Washington and HEATCON® in this important research, which we think will meet a key Boeing objective, which is to improve the maintainability of composite aircraft. One byproduct of this that we hope to achieve is a standardized process or method for pre-repair thermal mapping and leak detection. As well, this will provide a good opportunity for us to build on the strong relationship that we have with the UW and HEATCON®."

Megan Watson, Boeing Research & Technology lead engineer on the project

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Microscan

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Multiform Harvest, Inc

Seattle

Researcher: Dr. Joseph Harrison, Department of Animal Sciences, WSU Puyallup

Year project began: 2004

The effectiveness of a fluidized-bed crystallizer to remove phosphorus from dairy waste to prevent environmental degradation of surface water will be trialed at a dairy farm in Snohomish. Dairy production is one of the top-ranked agricultural industries in Washington. An estimated one-third of all dairy farms in Washington use flush/irrigation systems to create liquid fertilizer from the cattle waste. EPA regulations are calling for a reduction in build-up of phosphorus in soil. Solutions currently available are costly and cumbersome for dairy farmers to implement.

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Northwind Marine

Seattle

http://www.northwindmarine.com

RTD Award: Phase II

Research partner: Juris Vagners, Ph.D., Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington

Project Phase Began: 2007

Northwind Marine, a Seattle-based watercraft manufacturer, is teamed with Dr. Juris Vagners from the University of Washington's Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics to develop an automated, realtime navigation and communications system for Unmanned Surface Vessels (USVs), small boats used to monitor and protect maritime industries. Maritime Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) are a threat to naval and civilian assets such as ships, port facilities, oil terminals and platforms. Current interdiction to detect and deter IEDs requires manned teams, exposing them to potential harm. Autonomous robotic systems comprised of cooperating teams of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Unmanned Surface Vehicles (USVs) offer an attractive solution and provide 24/7 real time coverage of sensitive areas. Advances in miniaturized electronics and sensors coupled with sophisticated navigation systems have enabled the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for a large range of Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance (ISR) missions operating for extended periods of time over large geographical areas. Similar technology is now being applied to USV technology demonstrations. In a phase one project, Northwind Marine and the UW collaborated to adapt algorithms created through UW research for UAVs to Northwind's Sea Fox USVs. In this phase two project, the team will extend the algorithms to multiple USVs operating concurrently and demonstrate capabilities on one Sea Fox in sea tests. The immediate market for remote controlled or autonomous boats is dominated by security and surveillance applications for the military and for port security. Developing markets include research, surveying, and commercial fishing.

"It's very rewarding as the Chair of Ways and Means Committee to see such a rich return on the funds we have invested in Research and Technology. Even more so when it's in my own 11th District! These recipients will profoundly improve our quality of life for years to come."

State Sen. Margarita Prentice, (D-Renton)

"I'm proud to represent the 11th District which is filled with innovative companies such as Northwind Marine, a 2007 recipient of the Washington Technology Center's Research and Technology Development grant. For twenty five years their cutting-edge boat designs have kept our waterways safe, from Puget Sound to the Persian Gulf. And this partnership with the University of Washington's Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics will provide an invaluable service to maritime safety for years to come."

State Rep. Zack Hudgins, (D-Tukwila)

"The Research and Technology Development awards can make a big difference for small companies, such as Northwind Marine, that are looking to grow. The success of small companies is critical to job creation and sustainable economic development."

State Rep. Bob Hasegawa (D-Seattle)

RTD Award: Phase I

Research partner: Juris Vagners, Ph.D., Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington

Project Phase Began: 2005

Northwind Marine, a Seattle-based watercraft manufacturer, is teamed with Dr. Vagners to develop an automated, real-time navigation and communications system for Unmanned Surface Vessels (USVs), small boats used to monitor and protect maritime industries. Maritime Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) are a threat to naval and civilian assets such as ships, port facilities, oil terminals and platforms. Current interdiction to detect and deter IEDs requires manned teams, exposing them to potential harm. Autonomous robotic systems comprised of cooperating teams of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Unmanned Surface Vehicles (USVs) offer an attractive solution and provide 24/7 real time coverage of sensitive areas. Advances in miniaturized electronics and sensors coupled with sophisticated navigation systems have enabled the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for a large range of Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance (ISR) missions operating for extended periods of time over large geographical areas. The same technology has not yet been applied to USVs. This project will adapt algorithms created through UW research for UAVs to Northwind's Sea Fox USVs and enable cooperative operation with the Scan Eagle UAV (built by The Insitu Group). The immediate market for remote controlled or autonomous boats is dominated by security and surveillance applications for the military and for port security. Developing markets include research, surveying, and commercial fishing.

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Systematix Controls

Tukwila

Researcher: Richard R. Gustafson, University of Washington College of Forest Resources

Year project began: 2002

Systematix Controls manufactures pulp and paper-process control systems. The company is collaborating with Richard Gustafson, UW professor of Paper Science and Engineering, to further develop an optical sensor for measuring lignin content of individual wood fibers. Lignin is the natural glue that holds cellulose fibers together in wood and must be removed when making paper and pulp products. The sensor, originally developed with support from UW's Center for Process Analytical Chemistry, the U.S. Dept. of Energy, and pulp and paper companies, will allow paper and pulp mills to produce a more uniform product. Dr. Gustafson's expertise is in the area of sensors and control of pulp and paper systems, recently focusing on single-fiber analysis techniques.

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Todd Pacific Shipyards Corporation

Seattle

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