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Washington Technology Center Funding & Services Microfabrication Lab Industries Initiative News Forum
Washington Technology Center Clients

Agilent

San Jose, California

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American Semiconductor, Inc.

American Semiconductor, Inc., Boise, Idaho
American Semiconductor (ASI) recently developed a collaborative relationship with the Washington Technology Center for use of the WTC Microfabrication Laboratory and its equipment. American Semiconductor is a fabless developer of semiconductor process solutions for low-power, RF, analog and digital integrated circuits resolving CMOS technology limitations for next generation scaling of advanced microelectronics. As a pure-play foundry for wafer fabrication and advanced process development, ASI's focus is on foundry and custom process development support for fabless and IDM commercial organizations and research institutions. In addition to foundry services, American Semiconductor is active in advanced technology research supported by agencies such as the U.S. Department of Defense. ASI utilizes the Microfab Lab process tools for a number of development projects including photo diode and biosensor fabrication. ASI recently completed a major milestone in the development of the patent pending Flexfet™ silicon-on-insulator (SOI) CMOS technology with an impressive prototype demonstration.

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Carbon Nanoprobes
Malvern, Pa. (formerly Seattle)

http://cnprobes.com

Carbon Nanoprobes in the WTC news forum

RTD Award: Phase I

Research Partner: William R. Schief Jr, Ph.D., Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington

Project Began: 2007

Carbon Nanoprobes, a startup company developing high-resolution probes for atomic force microscopy, has teamed with University of Washington's William Schief, Senior Fellow in the Department of Biochemistry, to develop a scanning probe tip useful in drug discovery. The project team will evaluate the feasibility of reliably producing small-diameter single-walled nanotube probes for the atomic force microscope. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile tool used to create 3D molecular images and to pinpoint electrostatic, magnetic, and physical moduli on a surface. While AFM has been a popular choice among physical scientists, it has not reached the same level of usage among the life sciences community, due particularly to the current lack of resolution. The resolution of AFM, which is achieved by dragging a sharp stylus over a surface, is limited by the diameter of the stylus probe tip. The use of carbon nanotubes as probe tips should allow for single digit angstrom resolution, a 10x or greater increase in resolution over current commercial capabilities. Using HIV vaccine design as a case study, the UW research team will demonstrate that carbon nanotube probe tips will be useful in biological applications - positioning AFM as an emerging tool in modern drug discovery.

"I am thrilled to see the state of Washington positioning itself as a leader in the new economy. By helping companies such as Carbon Nanoprobes to succeed, we have the potential not only to make dramatic advances in health care, but also to provide jobs for the next generation."

State Rep. Jamie Pedersen (D-Seattle)

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CombiMatrix Corp.

Mukilteo

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Intel Corporation

Hillsboro, Oregon

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JP Innovations

Monroe (Company was located in Arlington at the time of WTC-affiliation)

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Kinetics Mechanical Service

Union City, California

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Lippi System Ltd.

India

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Lumera Corp.

Bothell

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Michigan State University

East Lansing, Michigan

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Microscan

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Microvision, Inc.

Redmond (Located in Bothell for a previous WTC affiliation)

http://www.microvision.com

Microvision in the WTC news forum
Research Partner: Dr. Kannan M. Krishnan, UW Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Project Began: 2004

Micro-electro-mechanical-system(MEMS)-based scanners are a natural choice for the scanning mirror requirements of scanned beam displays (SBDs). SBDs offer unique advantages for near-to-eye applications, such as head-worn displays for DVD players, or image-capture applications, including bar code scanners and endoscopes.
Current MEMS technologies offer scanners that are small and relatively low-cost to manufacture. However, many consumer market applications require lower cost, smaller packaging, and lower battery drain. Achieving these goals will open up numerous high-volume consumer product opportunities, as no other display technology, such as LCDs, can compete in the area of performance. Improving the MEMS actuation means (controlling the motion of a MEMS scanner) is one way to achieve these goals.

Microvision has teamed with Professor Krishnan to investigate the development of materials and processes for fabrication of hard micromagnets for actuation of MEMS devices. These new materials can reduce size, power, and costs, opening up the growing consumer market.

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Nanomaterials Discovery Corporation

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NanoString Technologies

Seattle, WA

NanoString™ Technologies is developing a patent-pending nanotechnology-based platform for high speed, completely automated, robust, highly multiplexed, single molecule identification and digital quantification. This breakthrough has the potential to become a biological operating system on which any biomolecular analysis application can be developed. The NanoString™ system uniquely barcodes each individual target molecule, scans them, and delivers a literal inventory of single molecules in the biological sample. Applications include gene expression analysis, genotyping, proteomics, clinical diagnostics and, in the future, predictive, preventative, and personalized medicine. NanoString will be using the Microfab Lab to prototype microfluidic devices in a variety of materials.

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nLIGHT Photonics

Vancouver

http://www.nlight.net

nLIGHT in the WTC news forum

RTD Award: Phase II

Project Title: "Experimental Design of a Microchannel Electronics Cooler for High-Power Semiconductor Diode Laser Applications"

Research Partner: Assistant Professor Amir Jokar, Ph.D., School of Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University Vancouver

Project Phase Began: 2008

nLight Photonics, a manufacturer of high-power laser diode-based products located in Vancouver, Wash., is teamed with WSU Vancouver's School of Engineering and Computer Science to improve the cooling of their products.

WSU Vancouver received $42,500 in Phase II Research and Technology Development funding from Washington Technology Center for the project titled "Experimental Design of a Microchannel Electronics Cooler for High-Power Semiconductor Diode Laser Applications."

High-power laser diodes are used widely throughout industry. As diode laser devices are operated, a portion of the electric power used is converted to waste thermal energy. Improving the cooling of these diodes will allow greater power levels and open up opportunities for numerous new applications.

In this Phase II project, nLight and the thermal/fluid team of WSU Vancouver, including Dr. Amir Jokar, Dr. Stephen Solovitz and research assistant Joseph Dix, will optimize and experimentally validate an electronics cooling subsystem previously studied by computational techniques. nLight plans to incorporate improved cooling subsystems in products for its defense, industrial, medical, and graphic arts markets.

"Even if you don't understand the science involved in this project, it's easy to understand the economic potential. The state is always looking to invest in increasing Washington's commercialization capacity. nLight Photonics is one more example of research and industry's potential to work together in Southwest Washington not just to generate new high-tech ideas, but to get those ideas to market as usable, sellable products. I congratulate them on their worthy project and on receiving this grant."

State Sen. Craig Pridemore, (D-Vancouver)

"This partnership between a cutting edge company like nLight and WSU Vancouver underscores the world wide significance of research in commercial technology applications in South West Washington."

State Rep. Bill Fromhold (D-Vancouver)

RTD Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Experimental Design of a Microchannel Electronics Cooler for High-Power Semiconductor Diode Laser Applications"

Research Partner: Assistant Professor Amir Jokar, Ph.D., School of Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University Vancouver

Project Phase Began: 2007

Through this RTD grant award, nLight Photonics, a Vancouver-based manufacturer of laser diode-based solutions, has teamed with Dr. Amir Jokar of WSU Vancouver's School of Engineering and Computer Science to analyze and improve the heat transfer of nLight diode laser products. High-power laser diodes are used widely throughout industry. As diode laser devices are operated, a portion of the electric power used is converted to waste thermal energy. Improving the cooling of these diodes will allow greater power levels and open up opportunities for numerous new applications. Beginning with analysis of the heat transfer and fluid flow through nLight's existing single-phase cooling subsystem, nLight and Dr. Jokar plan to create a more optimal cooling subsystem design using an alternative working fluid and/or a two-phase flow. Dr. Jokar and a research assistant will conduct comprehensive numerical modeling using computational thermal and fluid dynamics techniques. nLight plans to incorporate improved cooling subsystems in products for its defense, industrial, medical, and graphic arts markets.

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Pacific Bioscience Labs, Inc.

Seattle

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PCB Piezotronics

Depew, New York

http://www.pcb.com/

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Polymers Northwest

Mukilteo

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Quantum Leap Technology

Beaverton, Oregon

http://www.clearedgepower.com/

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SiVerta, Inc.

Milpitas, California

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Stratos

Seattle

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System To ASIC Inc.

Bothell

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Taiwan R.O.C.

Taiwan

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Technology Connections

Boise, Idaho

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Therus Corporation

Seattle

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TraceDetect

Seattle

http://www.tracedetect.com/

Researcher: Karl F. Böhringer, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering

Year project began: 2004

TraceDetect develops electrochemical sensors for water analysis, and switching and sensing technologies. This project will research, design, and build a prototype fiber-optic routing switch for telecommunications system applications that is compact, low-power, and significantly faster than current products.

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Voxtel, Inc.

Beaverton, Oregon

Voxtel is a global leader in photonic devices and systems. Headquartered in Beaverton, Oregon, the company specializes in developing and commercializing advanced detectors, imaging devices, and electro-optical systems including avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and photon counting modules, high speed, radiation hardened CMOS imaging sensors, laser radar receivers and systems, multi-spectral imaging systems, wavefront sensors, and infrared radiometric imaging systems. Voxtel is using the Microfab Lab's low-stress PECVD silicon nitride process for mesa APD sidewall passivation.

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Zeus Semiconductor

Vancouver

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