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Washington Technology Center Clients

3TIER
Seattle

http://www.3tiergroup.com/

3TIER in the WTC news forum
RTD Award: Phase I

Research Partner: Andrew Wood, Ph.D., Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Washington

Project Phase Began: 2006

Hydropower is a multi-billion dollar worldwide industry. In Washington, 76 percent of the state's electricity is generated through hydropower. 3TIER, a Seattle-based technology company, provides forecasting and assessment products and services for weather-driven renewable energy resources (wind, hydro and solar power). Stream flow forecasting is dependent on accurate, real-time estimates of the amount of water stored in the watershed as soil moisture or snow pack. Observations of the snowpack are increasingly available; however, proven methods for assimilating this information (particularly observations from new sensors) into existing hydropower assessment systems are lacking. 3TIER is working with Dr. Andrew Wood and researchers in the UW's Civil and Environmental Engineering Department to develop accurate stream flow forecast techniques that allow more seamless integration of short record data products into assessment and prediction systems. 3TIER plans to test these techniques on two river basins in Washington: Skagit and Pend Oreille. 3TIER and UW have a strong track record in developing this type of technology, receiving a grant from WTC in 2003 to develop similar forecasting advancements for wind energy.
Researcher: Dr. Tilmann Gneiting, UW Dept. of Statistics

Project Phase Began: 2003

3TIER is a technology company that uses advanced weather and environmental forecasting techniques and computer-based modeling strategies for forecasting renewable energies. The company is researching more accurate methods of short-term forecasting for wind energy, the world's fastest-growing energy generation source. In conjunction with Dr. Gneiting, 3TIER is developing an algorithm for short-term wind forecasting using multivariate time series and geostatistical space-time techniques.

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Aculight
Bothell

http://www.aculight.com

Researcher: Ann Mescher, UW Mechanical Engineering Dept.

Year project began: 2000

Aculight designs, develops, and manufactures solid-state lasers for new applications in industries as diverse as medicine, semiconductor processing, and telecommunications. As solid-state lasers get smaller and power output increases, cooling the laser becomes a significant challenge. In collaboration with Ann Mescher of the UW Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aculight is investigating MEMS processes at WTC's Microfab Lab to achieve a novel thermal management system that efficiently removes high heat flux from the laser's package. Aculight, one of the top 100 fastest-growing private companies in Washington, forecasts overall sales in excess of $20 million by 2004.

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Advanced Electroluminescent Sciences, LLC
Woodinville

Research Partner: Alex K.Y. Jen, University of Washington, Materials Sciences and Engineering

Project Description

The Dept of Energy (DOE) estimates that over $50 billion in electricity costs is wasted annually in the U.S. due to the low efficiency of lighting sources. Incandescent and fluorescent light bulbs are inefficient producers of light. They have also reached their physical potential threshold with respect to improvement. The solution lies in new methods of converting electricity to visible light. White light emitting diodes (LEDs) are promising alternatives. However, for white LEDs to become widely accepted in the market, they must be cost effective and realize power efficiency and lifetime requirements for general lighting applications. Currently, LEDs do achieve greater performance as measured in lumens per Watt (lm/W) than incandescent bulbs (15 lm/W and 600 hours), and are approaching the performance of fluorescent bulbs at 80 lm/W and 10,000 hours. LEDs have the capability of delivering over 180 lm/W for 10,000 hours and more. However, key obstacles remain for the broad adoption of white LEDs for general lighting. This is primarily due to a need for high performance materials to convert the electrical power efficiently to the right spectrum of light, ensure stable performance over time, and enable low-cost manufacturing. Advanced Electroluminescent Sciences (AES), a University of Washington spin-out company, is partnering with researchers in the UW's materials sciences department to develop and prototype a new class of white LEDs based on polymers rather than inorganic molecules. Polymer-based organic LEDs (OLEDs) will better meet the performance and cost requirements than inorganic LEDs, and will approach a greater standard of color accuracy, durability, energy efficiency, and cost-effectiveness than current lighting on the market. OLED devices are being introduced to the market as displays for consumer electronic devices such as digital cameras. OLED displays offer many advantages, but have not been suitable for use in general lighting. AES' efforts focus on developing OLED devices which emit much more light, so that they can serve to replace fluorescent bulbs.

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Aerojet

Redmond

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Allez PhysiOnix
Seattle

Researchers: Dr. Michel Kliot and Dr. Pierre Mourad, UW Dept. of Neurological Surgery (2002, 2005)

Allez PhysiOnix, in collaboration with Dr. Pierre D. Mourad, Research Associate Professor of the Department of Neurological Surgery and Principal Physicist of the Applied Physics Lab, both at the University of Washington, have developed a methodology to non-invasively determine intracranial pressure (ICP), a critical determinant of brain function. Head trauma is the major cause of death in persons under the age of 45, typically due to increased ICP. Intracranial pressure can also result from tumors, stroke, and other neurological disorders. More than 1 million patents may need their ICP monitored each year. Currently there is no non-invasive method for determining the levels of ICP. It can only be measured through highly invasive procedures requiring the participation of neurosurgeons. ICP monitoring is only conducted for 100,000 patients per year. This limited monitoring hinders the early diagnosis of many brain maladies, and reduces the chance of successful treatment of these maladies. A simple non-invasive method of monitoring ICP would allow early measurement both in and outside of a hospital setting, and should improve the medical outcome for many patients. In an initial project, the team developed an empirical method to determine ICP non-invasively based on transcranial Doppler (TCD) measurements of the brain and supporting physiological data. Currently the device requires the services of a skilled neuro-sonographer to manipulate the transducer. This project will help to evolve the technology to the point that it can be more easily deployed, without special skills, in a user-independent manner.

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Applied Micro Optics

Mukilteo

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Applied Precision, Inc.
Issaquah (Company was located in Mercer Island for a previous WTC affiliation)

http://www.appliedprecision.com/

RTD Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Development of a fixed imaging platform and microfluidic devices for live-cell imaging"

Research Partner: Research Associate Professor Charles W. Frevert, DVM, ScD, School of Medicine, University of Washington

Phase Began: 2009

Applied Precision, Inc., an Issaquah-based manufacturer of biomedical imaging systems, is collaborating with the University of Washington's School of Medicine to commercialize a microfluidic imaging technology for biomedical applications.

UW will receive $95,215 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $22,500 from Applied Precision for the project titled "Development of a fixed imaging platform and microfluidic devices for live-cell imaging."

Microfluidics technology has considerable potential for cell biology, but it has not yet been widely used outside of academic laboratories specializing in microfluidics.

With this project, the collaborative team of Applied Precision and UW Research Associate Professor Charles W. Frevert, DVM, ScD, plans to develop a live-cell imaging microscope that seamlessly integrates with application-specific microfluidic devices to make microfluidics readily available to scientists in the commercial life sciences industries.

"The WTC R&D; grant enables us to combine the system design and manufacturing expertise of API with world class research at the University of Washington. By joining forces we will be able to deliver on the promise of microfluidic systems. These systems will enable research into new drugs, disease mechanisms, and stem cell biology. This knowledge will benefit the citizens of Washington state with new tools for the treatment and cure of diseases while bringing new high technology jobs into the region."

Paul Goodwin, lead scientist for the project at Applied Precision.

"Applied Precision is enthusiastic for this opportunity to work with key scientists at the University of Washington to bring the promise of microfluidics towards commercial viability."

Joseph Victor, president at Applied Precision.

"The WTC R&D; grant is important to us because it will enable new technology and strengthen a number of collaborations within the University of Washington. With this project, my laboratory and those of doctors Albert Folch and Charles Murry will be able to work together to solve important biological questions about cells of the immune system and how they fight off lung infections and also about the potential for adult and embryonic stem cells to regenerate cardiac muscle. The knowledge gained with these new tools will better our understanding of a number of important human diseases. This grant also strengthens our partnership with Applied Precision as we work together to commercialize a live-cell imaging microscope that seamlessly integrates with application specific microfluidic devices. Commercialization of this integrated turn-key imaging system will move microfluidics out of academic laboratories specializing in microfluidics and make this promising technology readily available to scientists in academic, pharmaceutical, and biotechnology research laboratories."

Charles W. Frevert, DVM, ScD, School of Medicine, University of Washington

"Applied Precision has a cutting-edge imaging technology that promises to unlock new doors in cellular biology, one of today's hottest areas of medical innovation because of the great potential for preventing and curing disease. Let's face it, the demand for health care discoveries will continue to be huge worldwide."

State Sen. Cheryl Pflug (R-Maple Valley)

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Arcadia Biosciences, Inc.
Seattle

http://www.arcadiabio.com

RTD Award: Phase II

Research Partner: Diter von Wettstein, Ph.D., Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University

Project Began: 2007

Arcadia Biosciences, Seattle, has teamed with Dr. Diter von Wettstein from Washington State University to accelerate the development of new wheat cultivars for Washington crops. The partners are working to create new strains of wheat that reduce the allergens linked to Celiac disease. This gluten sensitivity affects approximately 3 million Americans. This phase two project is a continuation of research to develop and commercialize wheat which lacks the gliadin epitopes that cause Celiac disease. New technologies for developing wheat are needed since the dietary quality of grain protein cannot be improved by conventional breeding. Washington is the third highest wheat producing state in the U.S. and its wheat industry is a $450 million business. However, the state faces increasing competition from foreign markets. Finding ways to quickly grow and harvest higher-quality wheat will close this gap, reduce costs to farmers, open up new revenue for the state's wheat industry, and improve the lives of those affected by Celiac disease.

"Investment in the technologies and industries of the future is critical to the economic vitality of our state. Companies such as Arcadia Biosciences are not only commercializing technologies that protect our health, they are providing the residents of our state with living-wage jobs."

State Sen. Jeanne Kohl-Welles, (D-Seattle)


RTD Award: Phase I

Research Partner: Diter von Wettstein, Ph.D., Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University

Project Began: 2006

Arcadia Biosciences, Seattle, has teamed with Dr. Diter von Wettstein from Washington State University to accelerate the development of new wheat cultivars for Washington crops. Incorporating Arcadia's Nitrogen Use Efficiency gene into the wheat may result in reduced fertilizer costs for farmers, improved wheat quality and limit environmental damage of excess nitrogen leaching into groundwater. The partners are also working to create new strains of wheat that reduce the allergens linked to celiac disease. This gluten sensitivity affects approximately 3 million Americans. Washington is the third highest wheat producing state in the U.S. and its wheat industry is a $450 million business. However, the state faces increasing competition from foreign markets. Finding ways to quickly grow and harvest higher-quality wheat will close this gap, reduce costs to farmers, and open up new revenue for the state's wheat industry.

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ARI Technologies, Inc.
Kent

http://www.aritechnologies.com/

Researcher: Robert Holtz, UW Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Year project began: 2000

Founded in 1990, ARI Technologies has developed thermochemical treatment technology that converts hazardous wastes to a nonhazardous and benign end product. This project will evaluate the engineering properties, environmental characteristics and stability of this end product to assess its suitability for landfill and other commercial civil engineering applications.

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Artemisia BioMedical, Inc.
Newcastle

http://www.artbiomedical.com/

RTD Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Preclinical Development of Artemisinin Trioxane Dimer-Peptide Conjugates as Targeted Cancer Therapeutics"

Research Partner: Tomikazu Sasaki, Ph.D., Department of Chemistry, University of Washington

Project Began: 2007

Artemisia BioMedical, a privately-held biotechnology company based in Newcastle, Washington, has teamed with University of Washington researchers Tomikazu Sasaki, Narendra Singh and Henry Lai to develop improved therapeutic treatment options for cancer and other serious diseases. The company-researcher team received $100,000 in Research and Technology Development funding from Washington State to further develop their project titled "Preclinical Development of Artemisinin Trioxane Dimer-Peptide Conjugates as Targeted Cancer Therapeutics". Cancer is a leading cause of death around the world. Although important progress is being made in all areas of clinical cancer treatments with extending survival rates, there remain limitations on current chemotherapeutic agents. Many cancer chemotherapies indiscriminately kill cancer cells and normal cells due to poor cellular selectivity. Artemisinin, a compound isolated from sweet wormwood, is an established and potent antimalarial agent, which has been found to selectively kill cancer cells without harming normal cells. Artemisinin has also been shown to be even more effective at killing cancer cells when co-delivered with iron that serves as a catalyst to activate the artemisinin molecule to generate cytotoxic free radicals. In their research and technology development project, Artemisia BioMedical and the University of Washington research team will develop and study new synthetic therapeutic agents that deliver artemisinin and iron as one package selectively into cancer cells. The end result of their work will be the creation of more highly selective, effective and safer therapeutics for people suffering from cancer with minimal side-effects. This WTC-supported technology holds promise as a breakthrough for the treatment of many types of human cancer.

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Asymetrix Corp.

Bellevue

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ATL Ultrasound (now Philips)
Bothell

Researcher: Amit Bandyopadhyay, WSU School of Mechanical & Materials Engineering

Year project began: 2000

ATL is a worldwide leader in the manufacturing, distribution, and service of diagnostic medical ultrasound systems. The project will design and develop high element count, high frequency micro-machined medical ultrasound transducers for skin, eye, and heart imaging.

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ATS
Silverdale

http://www.atsid.com

About ATS
ATS is an innovative engineering company that provides information exploitation and naval logistics services and technologies to agencies and departments within the U.S. Intelligence Community, Department of Defense, and various government/civilian organizations. ATS also provides mission-critical IT support services to both government and commercial customers. Founded in 1980, ATS is a Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business (SDVOSB) with offices in Silverdale, WA, Norfolk, VA and Washington, D.C. More information about ATS services and technology is available online at http://www.atsid.com.

RTD Award: Phase II

Project Title: "Schema mapping for a flexible graphical data mining platform"

Research Partner: Associate Professor Krishnamoorthy Sivakumar, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University

Phase Began: 2009

ATS, a Silverdale-based provider of intelligent search software and services, is working with Washington State University's School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science to develop data merging algorithms.

WSU will receive $50,000 in Phase II research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $17,500 from ATS for the project titled "Schema mapping for a flexible graphical data mining platform."

ATS and WSU Associate Professor Krishnamoorthy Sivakumar will continue a working collaboration in this Phase II project. The team plans to develop algorithms for recognizing similar or duplicate nodes or objects in a single database, or two related databases, and suitably merging them. These new data mining algorithms will aid in the discovery of information vital to many fields including Homeland Security and law enforcement.

"The power exists to generate, gather, share, and store vast amounts of information. The problem, however, is easily fusing this data so relationships and patterns are revealed and can be explored. A barrier to fusing data in any kind of cost or time effective manner is the issue of schema mapping. Without schema mapping, multiple data sources quickly become a digital version of the Tower of Babel and useless for providing timely information. Schema mapping is currently a time-consuming manual process and many data fusion initiatives have met their end due to the time and costs associated with schema mapping. This project with WSU holds the potential to significantly speed up the mapping process and position the State of Washington as a leader in the deep mining of the Internet and other large data sources."

ATS President David Wachter

"This project will build upon our earlier work on mining data objects represented graphically as nodes and links between them. Similarity between nodes based on their attributes and links to other nodes will be used to identify and combine similar objects."

Associate Professor Krishnamoorthy Sivakumar, Washington State University

"State grants which bring together local companies and research institutions will empower innovative ideas to become practical solutions and drive job creation and business opportunities. I am proud of the Silverdale-based company, ATS, which is a good example of a local company working with a state university."

State Sen. Phil Rockefeller (D-Kitsap County)

RTD Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Graphical Data Mining platform for Social Analysis and Network Discovery"

Research Partner: Associate Professor Krishnamoorthy Sivakumar, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University

Phase Began: 2008

ATS Intelligent Discovery, a Silverdale-based provider of intelligent search software and services, is working with Associate Professor Krishnamoorthy Sivakumar of Washington State University's School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science to develop a graphical database mining platform for improved data analysis and discovery.

WSU received $43,368 in Phase I Research and Technology Development funding from Washington Technology Center for the project titled "Graphical Data Mining platform for Social Analysis and Network Discovery."

Ten years ago, data storage was expensive, computer processing power was limited and databases were designed to optimize this precious processing and storage resource. Today processing power and costs have improved, but much data is still stored in a format that optimizes processing and storage over analysis and discovery.

In this Phase I project, ATS Intelligent Discovery and Dr. Sivakumar will develop and demonstrate powerful data mining algorithms and applications facilitated by ATS's patent pending REGGAE multidimensional data analysis engine. These new data mining algorithms will aid in the discovery of information vital to many fields including Homeland Security and law enforcement.

"Research innovation and ideas are shaping up to form the cornerstone of our 21st century economy. Public-private partnerships in our high-tech industry will play a big role in driving that economy forward. A great example of this is ATS Intelligent Discovery's work with WSU on its data mining project. I'm pleased that Kitsap County is the home base of this dynamic company."

State Sen. Phil Rockefeller, (D-Kitsap County)

"ATS Intelligent Discovery's ability to secure this grant is testament to the quality of work they're doing. High tech continues to drive our state's economy and it's great to see Silverdale on the edge of this job-producing industry. ATS's success and innovation will draw jobs to our community, and that's good news for everyone."

State Rep. Sherry Appleton (D-Poulsbo)

"Advances in research and development are key to our state's continued economic strength. This award shows how important Kitsap County's businesses are to the state network of research institutions and cutting-edge computer sciences."

State Rep. Christine Rolfes (D-Bainbridge Island)

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Boeing

Seattle

http://www.boeing.com
RTD Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Pre-Repair Thermal Mapping and Leak Detection"

Research Partner: Professor Ashley Emery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington

Phase Began: 2009

The Boeing Company's Research & Technology group and HEATCON® Composite Systems, a Seattle-based composite repair equipment supplier, are collaborating with the University of Washington's Mechanical Engineering Department to improve the efficiency of composite-structural repairs.

UW will receive $75,190 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $20,000 from The Boeing Company for the project titled "Pre-Repair Thermal Mapping and Leak Detection."

The composite aircraft industry will be increasingly reliant on hot-bond composite repairs to keep its aircraft in service. In this project, the collaborative team of HEATCON®, Boeing and UW Professor Ashley Emery, will create a Pre-Repair Mapping System that assesses the thermal anomalies and vacuum leaks often associated with the repair of composite structures. Phase I will validate the viability of the system, while future phases will commercialize the system.

"We look forward to working with the University of Washington and HEATCON® in this important research, which we think will meet a key Boeing objective, which is to improve the maintainability of composite aircraft. One byproduct of this that we hope to achieve is a standardized process or method for pre-repair thermal mapping and leak detection. As well, this will provide a good opportunity for us to build on the strong relationship that we have with the UW and HEATCON®."

Megan Watson, Boeing Research & Technology lead engineer on the project

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C3 Wireless Corp.

Mill Creek

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Carbon Nanoprobes
Malvern, Pa. (formerly Seattle)

http://cnprobes.com

Carbon Nanoprobes in the WTC news forum

RTD Award: Phase I

Research Partner: William R. Schief Jr, Ph.D., Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington

Project Began: 2007

Carbon Nanoprobes, a startup company developing high-resolution probes for atomic force microscopy, has teamed with University of Washington's William Schief, Senior Fellow in the Department of Biochemistry, to develop a scanning probe tip useful in drug discovery. The project team will evaluate the feasibility of reliably producing small-diameter single-walled nanotube probes for the atomic force microscope. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile tool used to create 3D molecular images and to pinpoint electrostatic, magnetic, and physical moduli on a surface. While AFM has been a popular choice among physical scientists, it has not reached the same level of usage among the life sciences community, due particularly to the current lack of resolution. The resolution of AFM, which is achieved by dragging a sharp stylus over a surface, is limited by the diameter of the stylus probe tip. The use of carbon nanotubes as probe tips should allow for single digit angstrom resolution, a 10x or greater increase in resolution over current commercial capabilities. Using HIV vaccine design as a case study, the UW research team will demonstrate that carbon nanotube probe tips will be useful in biological applications - positioning AFM as an emerging tool in modern drug discovery.

"I am thrilled to see the state of Washington positioning itself as a leader in the new economy. By helping companies such as Carbon Nanoprobes to succeed, we have the potential not only to make dramatic advances in health care, but also to provide jobs for the next generation."

State Rep. Jamie Pedersen (D-Seattle)

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CellVitro Technologies, Inc.
Seattle

Researcher: Dr. Albert Folch, University of Washington, Bioengineering Department

Year project began: 2004

The team is working to create a unique nanoscale "lab-on-a-chip" device to assist with drug discovery process. Cystic fibrosis, epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other debilitating conditions have been linked to malfunctioning ion channels - specialized proteins present in human cells that regulate the flow of ions including sodium, potassium, calcium and chloride in and out of the cell. Currently, screening new drug candidates for ion-channel-targeting properties is challenging. Development of a high-throughput screening technology with better data quality is needed to accelerate drug discovery processes. The proposed CellChip screening system combines automated, parallel analysis of drug compounds on living cells with high-throughput screening capabilities at earlier stages of drug discovery. This advanced screening technology will allow pharmaceutical companies to develop safer, more effective drugs and potentially shorten their to-market delivery cycle.

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CHROMiX, Inc.
Seattle

http://www.chromix.com

About CHROMiX
CHROMiX, Inc. was founded in 1998 to provide technical services and products to businesses in content-production industries. We dedicate our efforts to color management and image fidelity, and combine an excellent suite of tools, including our own popular ColorThink products, with years of industry experience. With customers, dealers and partners in over 83 countries, CHROMiX is uniquely qualified to serve the imaging industries. More information is available at www.chromix.com.

RTD Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Estimation for Color Management"

Research Partner: Maya R. Gupta, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Washington

Project Began: 2008

CHROMiX, a Seattle-based provider of color management software, is collaborating with the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering to improve an online color management profiling service for high-end imaging customers.

UW will receive $19,999 in Phase I Research and Technology Development funding from Washington Technology Center and $4,000 from CHROMiX for the project titled "Estimation for Color Management."

As the worldwide volume of printed material has steadily increased, customer expectations of image quality have also been rising. One major component of image quality is correct color reproduction. However, color management software is costly and often out of reach of quality-conscious consumers.

In this Phase I project, UW Assistant Professor Maya R. Gupta plans to transfer algorithmic technologies developed by her research group to CHROMiX to help the company augment their Web-based color management profiling service. The UW technologies have been shown to deliver 50 percent fewer errors over the best commercially available personal computer-based software solutions. The commercialized technology could enable CHROMiX to provide less expensive, yet more accurate, color profiling to thousands of customers worldwide.

"We are very excited to have been awarded a WTC grant, and to be working closely with the UW's exceptional Electrical Engineering Department. We have been conducting parallel research projects for quite some time, and look forward to seeing what happens when we put our heads together."

CHROMiX President Steve Upton

"This is a great opportunity to apply state-of-the-art estimation algorithms to the very practical problem of producing consistent color across devices."

UW Assistant Professor Maya Gupta

"This is great news, another illustration of Washington investing in R&D; to create new technologies, new products, new markets, and new jobs."

State Rep. Jim McIntire (D-Seattle)

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Circulation

Seattle

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CombiMatrix Corp.

Mukilteo

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Combustion Specialists

Maple Valley

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Cray, Inc.

Seattle

Researcher: Dr. Lawrence Snyder, UW Computer Science and Engineering Department

Year project began: 2004

This project will compare UW's supercomputer language ZPL to Cray's supercomputer language Chapel, with the goal of creating one parallel language that builds on the strongest assets of each program. This collaborative new language will be tested on Cray's next-generation supercomputers. Both software programs are open-source and will be used to accelerate the adoption and sale of supercomputers.

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dB Systems, Inc.

Redmond

Researcher: Jeff Bilmes, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering

Year project began: 2001

dB Systems produces high-reliability cockpit aircraft audio-control equipment and is interested in adding voice-command capabilities to their line of avionics audio panel systems. The project will develop and test a new approach to voice recognition, to be used for controlling various avionics instruments during noisy in-flight conditions.

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DiMeMa, Inc.

Seattle

Researcher: Professor Maya Gupta, University of Washington, Electrical Engineering Department

Year project began: 2004

This project involved a software solution for optimizing compression and structuring of scanned paper documents. DiMeMa is the manufacturer of the leading software used in libraries and archives for the creation of digital collections. The company products are currently sold to over 200 libraries in 42 states and six countries. As the digital age advances, archivists are looking to a process that allows printed documents to be scanned, compressed and converted to digital images. Current software is limited with respect to maintaining the quality of newspapers, maps, engineering and architectural drawings, and other documents that don't relate well to straight binary conversion due to grayscale details. The emerging standard for image compression is JPEG 2000.Gupta's group and DiDeMa is working on technology that will enhance this existing standard with better compression and features without sacrificing standardization or interchangeability with decompression software currently on the market.

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Dot On, Inc.

Issaquah

Researcher: Suzanne Weghorst, Human Interface Technology Lab, University of Washington

Year project began: 1999

Imagine being able to move the cursor on your computer screen by turning your head or pointing your finger, instead of using a mouse. Everyday computer tasks such as word-processing and spreadsheets would become easier by not having to switch from the keyboard to the mouse. New applications would be possible once the user wasn't tethered to the computer via a mouse or joystick.

Dot On, Inc., Issaquah, has developed a new cursor-control device called the "Dot Tracker." This prototype system uses a sensor, connected to the computer, that optically tracks the position of a small dot affixed to an object, such as a wireless-pointing device, or affixed directly to the head or finger of the user. The movement of the dot directs the position of the cursor on the screen. Potential markets for "Dot Tracker" include business applications, PC games, children's programs, and applications for the disabled.

Using specialized equipment at UW's Human Interface Technology Laboratory, Suzanne Weghorst is performing an analysis of head movements exhibited by average computer users during desktop applications. The results of this Entrepreneur's Access project will determine the precise refractive optics required for the head- or eyewear-mounted version of the product.

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dTEC Systems, LLC

Seattle

http://dtecsystems.us/

RTD Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Multi-analyte Chemical Sensor Platform"

Research Partner: Samson A. Jenekhe, Ph.D., Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington

Project Began: 2007

Seattle-based dTEC Systems, a developer of environmental monitoring systems, has teamed with University of Washington Chemical Engineering researcher Samson A. Jenekhe to develop a novel low-cost chemical sensor technology for on-site environmental applications. The company-researcher team has received $100,000 in Research and Technology Development funding from Washington state for their project titled "Multi-analyte Chemical Sensor Platform." Many agricultural operations and wastewater treatment facilities are required to perform hundreds of chemical measurements each year - a time-consuming and expensive process involving collecting samples and sending them for analysis at specialized laboratories. Existing on-site measurement tools and kits are labor intensive. The proposed on-site sensor technology being developed by dTEC Systems will result in time and money savings for agricultural operations. The technology is based on the development of a chemoresponsive-material and micromachined-device platform that enables customizable miniature sensors for multiple analytes. The handheld chemical analyzer that will be developed as part of this project will allow customers to optimize agricultural practices and better control the environmental impact of their businesses.

"Congratulations to dTEC for its ingenuity in helping agricultural businesses save time and money with a new chemical sensing technology. These innovations will be all the stronger for having been developed in partnership with the University of Washington."

Sen. Jeanne Kohl-Welles, (D-Seattle)

"Congratulations and thanks to these Washington firms for their creativity and leading-edge research."

Rep. Helen Sommers, (D-Seattle)

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EKOS Corporation

Bothell

http://www.ekoscorp.com

About EKOS Corporation
EKOS® Corporation pioneered the development and clinical application of microsonic technologies in medicine, introducing its first system for the treatment of vascular thrombosis in 2005. Today, interventional radiologists, cardiologists and vascular surgeons at leading institutions across the nation use EKOS MicroSonic Accelerated Thrombolysis to provide faster, safer and more complete dissolution of thrombus. In 2008, the company introduced its next generation EkoSonic Endovascular System with Rapid Pulse Modulation. The EkoSonic system is FDA cleared for controlled and selective infusion of physician-specified fluids, including thrombolytics, into the peripheral vasculature. It is currently used to treat patients with peripheral arterial occlusions (PAO) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and additional applications are being investigated. For more information visit www.EKOScorp.com.

Research & Technology Development (RTD) Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Development of an algorithm to accurately predict 'end of therapy' in ultrasound-facilitated Thrombolysis"

Research Partner: Hong Shen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Chemical Engineering, University of Washington

Project Began: 2008

EKOS Corporation, a Bothell-based medical device company, is teamed with the University of Washington Department of Chemical Engineering to improve the company's proprietary catheter-based drug-delivery system.

UW will receive $30,000 in Phase I Research and Technology Development funding from Washington Technology Center and $6,000 from EKOS for the project titled "Development of an algorithm to accurately predict 'end of therapy' in ultrasound-facilitated Thrombolysis."

Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is a therapy for patients with vascular diseases such as deep vein thrombosis. However, current use of CDT is associated with high costs. These costs are due to technology limitations that result in doctors prescribing larger than necessary drug dosages and longer durations of therapy.

In this Phase I project, the collaborative team of EKOS and UW Assistant Professor Hong Shen plan to analyze patient data to develop an algorithm that will better predict the end of CDT therapy. Follow-on projects will involve the development and launch of the resulting software upgrade. EKOS plans to add this new technology to its current product line, potentially making CDT a more attractive and economical treatment option for doctors and patients.

"Investing in our communities and businesses through economic development really does enhance people's lives and our business climate. This research and development funding to EKOS is geared to develop ways to lower costs of essential medical treatment for those with vascular problems. To these people and their families, this work quite possibly can make a world of difference. These continued funding grants are targeted investments that help a lot of people."

State Sen. Rosemary McAuliffe (D-Bothell).

"This is great news for the research industry in the Bothell area. I'm very happy to hear about the partnership, and I hope that there are many more like it."

State Rep. Al O'Brien (D-Mountlake Terrace)

Focused Technology Initiative (FTI) Award

Research Partner: Fatih Dogan, UW Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering

Project began: 2001

Founded in 1995, EKOS is focused on developing proprietary ultrasound-based systems and devices for local drug delivery. Highly reliable piezoelectric ceramic transducers are crucial to the success of the devices developed by EKOS. This project works towards the development of such transducers by identifying the failure mechanisms of the ceramic material and developing improved material strength.
Labels: Bothell, District_1, King_County, Life_Sciences, Puget_Sound, RTD_Grant_Program, UW

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Emerald BioStructures

Bainbridge Island

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Enerdyne Solutions

North Bend

Researchers: Dr. George LaRue, Dr. Mohamed Osman, WSU Electrical Engineering Department

Year project began: 2004

This project will focus on developing a Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) Radio Frequency (RF) amplifier, for use in wireless communications and radar applications, that has two- to three-times higher thermal performance over existing designs. This has the potential to increase power and reliability without compromising battery life or adding to the cost, size, or weight of the device.

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EnerG2, LLC (formerly Lygan Tech.)

Seattle

http://www.energ2.com

EnerG2 in the WTC news forum

RTD Award: Phase III

Research Partner: Guozhong Cao, Ph.D., Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington

Project Phase Began: 2006

With today's rising gas prices, alternative fuel vehicles such as gas-electric hybrids and biodiesel are more in demand than ever. However, better energy storage technology is needed to bridge the gap between generation of power and consumption of power in these vehicles. Battery power has limited capacity; hydrogen power is still in its adolescence. High performance or "super" capacitors hold immediate promise as a solution. EnerG2 is a Seattle-based technology company dedicated to developing environmentally-conscious energy products. In 2004, EnerG2 partnered with Dr. Guozhong Cao, Associate Professor in the Materials Science and Engineering department at the University of Washington, to evaluate the properties and performance of the company's carbon-based material for a wide range of industrial, environmental, military and medical applications. The team received $240,000 in grant funding from WTC to conduct this research. In this third phase of R&D;, Dr. Cao and EnerG2 are working to further optimize the company's technology for super capacitors and develop a commercially-scalable manufacturing plan for introducing the product to market.

Research Partner: Dr. Guozhong Cao, Associate Professor, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Washington

Founded in 2003, EnerG2 is focused on developing and applying advanced technologies in the global energy sector. The company has teamed with Dr. Guozhong Cao to develop a nanotechnology-based industrial gas storage solution. While methane, nitrogen and other specialty gases have long been used in a wide variety of industrial applications, media for their storage have not been improved for decades. EnerG2's carbon-based nanostructures offer safe, efficient storage at an affordable cost, with the goal of reducing the industry's current dependence on high pressures, low temperatures and inflexible canister form factors to store industrial gasses. Initial research conducted by EnerG2 and UW's Materials Science department demonstrated that these specially-designed carbon cryogels are effective as high-efficiency, high-density gas storage media. This follow on grant funding will be used to focus on the remaining challenges to be overcome in order to commercialize this technology. The most promising potential markets for this technology are compressed natural gas (CNG) and industrial gas storage. Eventually, the company hopes to use this technology to provide a solution for hydrogen storage for fuel cell powered vehicles.

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Enertechnix

Maple Valley

http://www.enertechnix.com

About Enertechnix
Enertechnix develops and commercializes innovative technologies for environmental monitoring and improving the efficiency, cleanliness and safety of large-scale energy conversion processes. Since its inception in 1995, Enertechnix has developed and commercialized acoustic systems for measuring gas temperatures in large-scale boilers, and mid-IR imaging systems for visual monitoring of conditions within high temperature, particle-laden environments. Enertechnix is involved in a broad program of research and development, aimed at airborne aerosol capture and classification, measuring temperatures in gasifiers, detection of IEDs, and monitoring of personal exposure to toxins and allergens.

RTD Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Improved Efficiency of Energy-Intensive Processes through Control of Build-up on Critical Heat-Transfer Surfaces"

Research Partner: Associate Professor Alexander V. Mamishev, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington

Phase Began: 2009

Enertechnix, a Maple Valley-based manufacturer of high-temperature imaging systems, is collaborating with the University of Washington's Department of Electrical Engineering to develop algorithms to control the cleaning of heat-transfer surfaces in industrial processes.

UW will receive $100,000 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $20,000 from Enertechnix for the project titled "Improved Efficiency of Energy-Intensive Processes through Control of Build-up on Critical Heat-Transfer Surfaces."

Cleaning slag build-up in Kraft boilers used in the paper and pulp industries is currently an energy-intensive and inefficient process. Steam cleaners are typically operated on a timed sequence, based on historical experience with fouling in the convective systems.

With this project, the collaborative team of Enertechnix and UW Associate Professor Alexander V. Mamishev plan to develop image-processing and estimation algorithms to automatically control the cleaning of heat transfer surface build-up to maximize energy efficiency. The implementation of the proposed technology would lead to significant energy and cost savings, and reduce the emission of associated pollutants and greenhouse gases.

"We are very excited at the potential of this project to positively impact operation of power and chemical recovery boilers. We look forward to working with the UW team to develop this technology and ensure that it is available to these energy-intensive facilities throughout the world."

George Kychakoff, President of Enertechnix.

"The intent of this effort is to move as soon as possible from laboratory experiments to real industrial environments. The University of Washington's Industrial Assessment Center (UW IAC) will work with the manufacturing companies in the Pacific Northwest to conduct field trials of the thermal imaging system that we will design."

Professor Alexander Mamishev, who serves as Principal Investigator in this project and Director of UW IAC.

"Enertechnix has an imaging process that allows high-heat industries, like pulp and paper companies, to 'see' inside their furnaces and clean them at optimum intervals. This allows companies to achieve maximum energy efficiency and minimum pollution levels, and both of those outcomes command a premium price today."

State Sen. Cheryl Pflug (R-Maple Valley)

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Erudite Systems, Inc.

Everett

Researcher: Professor Les Atlas, Electrical Engineering, University of Washington

Everett-based Erudite Systems, Inc. is teamed with Professor Les Atlas to develop an acoustic monitoring system designed to increase security measures for the shipping industry. More than 6 million shipping containers enter U.S. ports each year. Yet only two percent of containers are inspected by customs officials. Large-scale inspection operations are an impractical and costly endeavor. Sensors offer a more cost-effective and non-invasive solution. ESI and UW are collaborating on the development of an acoustic monitoring system that would allow for real-time monitoring of sound and vibration signals in a container environment. The project combines ESI's Ambient Envelope Sensor (AES) technology with the UW's Modulation Spectrum technology which compresses waveforms for cost-effective storage and access. ESI hopes to incorporate this new acoustic technology into its latest products in development -- GeoLock and StrongBox -- which use vibration, temperature, GPS, and other sensors to monitor shipping container activity and increase security.

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E-valuations Research

Seattle

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Evans & Sutherland

Federal Way

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FLOW International

Kent

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Forest Concepts LLC

Auburn (located in Federal Way during a WTC affiliation)

http://www.forestconcepts.com

Researcher: Joan Q. Wu, Associate Professor, Biological Engineering Systems, Washington State University

Project date: 2005

Founded in 1998, Forest Concepts develops and commercializes innovative wood products. The company is teamed with Dr. Wu and the Soil and Water Engineering Research Work Unit, part of the Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station in Moscow, Idaho, to develop engineering data that will enable design of a wood-strand material for wind erosion control and air quality protection. Forest Concepts' WoodStraw erosion control material is a natural wood product made from the by-products of forest thinning and veneer manufacturing. Wind and water erosion are major ecological problems. Airborne dust from construction sites, wildfire aftermath, and farmland can be hazardous to human health and the environment. Wind erosion poses a particular challenge since the engineering science is not sufficient to enable disciplined design of control methods. Existing control techniques either are not cost effective or not environmentally sustainable. WoodStraw material offers a possible solution. The wood strands are environmentally friendly, decomposing into organic matter without introducing non-native weeds or chemical materials into the soil. They are more wind resistant than current products on the market, allowing for better and longer protection until natural vegetation develops. Forest Concepts and Dr. Wu plan to test the properties of WoodStraw strands to optimize performance in controlling wind erosion.

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FungusAmongUs

Snohomish

http://www.fungusamongus.com

RTD Award: Phase I

Research Partner: Dr. Juming Tang and researchers in Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University

Project Began: 2007

FungusAmongUs, a Snohomish-based supplier of non-perishable mushroom-based products, has teamed with Dr. Juming Tang from Washington State University to develop processes for producing shelf-stable ready-to-serve soup in flexible, heat-sealable containers called retortable pouches. The WSU research team will conduct the design and development of thermal sterilization processes and products. FungusAmongUs will provide the guidelines and raw materials for soup formulation. FungusAmongUs has an established presence in the gourmet and natural market as a producer of organic mushroom-based soups with products sold through national and local outlets such as Whole Foods, QFC and Fred Meyer. Washington state is the fourth largest producer of mushrooms in the U.S. with a $15 million share of the $889 million annual U.S. mushroom market. Over the past 10 years as consumers have become familiar with more exotic varieties, demand for medicinal and culinary uses of mushrooms has steadily increased. High in nutrition, mushrooms are now regarded as a beneficial food in modern diets. As eating habits have changed, today's consumers expect quick but healthy foods. Recent consumer surveys indicate strong interest in ready-made soup, with the organic soup category showing 40% growth in 2005. Development of process protocols for shelf-stable ready-to-serve mushroom soups will widen the product range available to FungusAmongUs and, in turn, lead to higher sales volumes and generation of more employment opportunities.

"This program helps to create more high-tech, high wage jobs in Snohomish County. The ripple effect from these jobs will benefit the entire region."

State Sen. Steve Hobbs (D-Lake Stevens)

"This is the perfect kind of targeted help from the state that builds jobs. New jobs are in new markets and this is a perfect example."

State Rep. Hans Dunshee, (D-Snohomish)

"Our economy used to be based on horsepower - and now it runs on brainpower. The research we're doing, and the scientific barriers we're breaking, will make our economy strong here in Washington state and improve the health and lives of people around the world.

State Rep. John Lovick (D-Mill Creek)

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General Dynamics Space Propulsion Systems

Redmond

http://www.rocket.com/

Researcher: Todd A. Anderson, UW Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics

Year project began: 2002

General Dynamics Space Propulsion Systems provides on-board propulsion for spacecraft using a range of technologies, from conventional chemical engines to advanced electric propulsion systems that accelerate electrically charged plasmas. At the heart of the latest propulsion technology, the Hall thruster, are high-performance electromagnets that accelerate ionized xenon gas to speeds up to 20 km/s. The company is teaming with Todd Anderson of the University of Washington to produce innovative, high-temperature, compact, lightweight electromagnetic assemblies. Dr. Anderson has expertise in embedded sensors, multifunctional structures and special materials. The team believes that by combining the right conductor and insulator materials with an unusual coil topology, the mass of these critical assemblies can be cut in half, while providing high reliability in severe thermal, vibration, and radiation environments.

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Genespan Corp.

(Business Closed)

Bothell

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Greenwood Technologies (business closed)

Bellevue

http://www.GreenwoodUSA.com

About Greenwood Technologies, LLC
Greenwood Technologies is a clean-burning, renewable heating solutions company, located in the Pacific Northwest. The Greenwood Technologies high efficiency wood and biomass boilers are available through dealers and retailers across the United States and Canada. More information is available at (800) 959-9184 or www.GreenwoodUSA.com.

RTD Award: Phase III (* project canceled)

Project Title: "Fuel-Flexible Biomass Hydronic Furnaces"

Research Partner: Professor John Kramlich, Ph.D., Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington

Phase Began: 2009

Greenwood Technologies, is a renewable heating solutions company headquartered in Bellevue, Washington. Greenwood manufactures high efficiency wood and biomass boilers for residential and commercial applications. The company is collaborating with the University of Washington's Department of Mechanical Engineering to enhance the capabilities of one of the company's wood-fired hydronic furnaces.

UW will receive $76,536 in Phase III research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $27,383 from Greenwood Technologies for the project titled "Fuel-Flexible Biomass Hydronic Furnaces."

Firewood is a highly desirable alternative fuel as it is renewable, domestically produced, low cost and abundantly available in many areas of the country. With the rapid increase of conventional home-heating fuel prices, a growing number of people are turning to alternative fuels such as wood to reduce their reliance on high-priced fuels.

Greenwood Technologies and UW Professor John Kramlich will continue a working collaboration in this Phase III project. The team plans to develop systems to provide fuel flexibility, low emissions, and high efficiency in wood-fired hydronic furnaces. Greenwood plans to reconfigure their next generation product line to take advantage of this new technology development.

Professor Kramlich says that the joint Washington Technology Center and Greenwood Technologies project has been one of the most rewarding he has worked on at the UW. The close coordination between the design and modeling work at the UW and the testing at Greenwood Technologies has moved the technology forward faster than would have been possible for either party alone. These efforts have propelled Greenwood Technologies designs into the select group of those furnaces that meet the Phase I EPA emissions criteria.

"The biomass heating category is exploding in potential and partnerships like this one with the UW will ensure that the technology thrives. Innovation is the key to our success."

Tom Eckmann, CEO of Greenwood Technologies

RTD Award: Phase II

Project Title: "Low Emission Wood-Burning Hydronic Furnace"

Research Partner: Professor John Kramlich, Ph.D., Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington

Phase Began: 2008

Greenwood Technologies, a Bellevue company that manufactures a clean-burning wood furnace, is working with John Kramlich, Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Washington, to develop a low-emission combustion system that meets strict environmental standards.

UW received $72,988 in Phase II Research and Technology Development funding from Washington Technology Center for the project titled "Low Emission Wood-Burning Hydronic Furnace."

Whole wood is a highly desirable alternative fuel as it is renewable, domestically produced, low cost and abundantly available in many areas of the country. With the rapid increase of conventional home-heating fuel prices, a growing number of people are turning to alternative fuels such as wood to reduce their reliance on high-priced fuels.

In this Phase II project, Greenwood Technologies and Dr. Kramlich will perform fluid dynamic calculations that will lead to the development of a new high-efficiency wood-fired Greenwood furnace design. As a direct result of their previous Phase I project, emissions from the Greenwood furnace are well below the standards set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for cordwood fuels. With additional work in Phase II, the furnace should be able to meet stricter emission and performance standards, including those set by Northeast states that will take effect in 2010.

"As a strong supporter of environmental protection, I was proud to support a bill passed in 2007 encouraging the use of biofuels and reducing our fossil fuel consumption. It is companies like Greenwood who make Washington a leader in the fight against global warming."

State Sen. Rodney Tom, (D-Medina)

"I'm pleased that Greenwood Technologies was able to win a competitive grant from the Washington Technology Center, enabling them to continue to invest in clean-burning wood furnaces. This kind of research helps improve the environment for all of us, and keeps attracting smart people to live and work on the Eastside."

State Rep. Ross Hunter (D-Medina)

RTD Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Low Emission Wood-Burning Hydronic Furnace"

Research Partner: Professor John Kramlich, Ph.D., Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington

Phase Began: 2007

Greenwood Technologies, a Bellevue company that manufactures a clean-burning, wood-fired furnace for energy-efficient home heating, has teamed with University of Washington's John Kramlich, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Associate Chair for Academics, to develop a low-emission combustion system for a wood-burning hydronic furnace. The goal of the collaboration is to modify the Greenwood Model 100 hydronic furnace design to meet or surpass Washington state's clean air wood burning standards.

The UW team will focus on the development of an advanced fluid dynamic model of the afterburning portion of the furnace, including a particle burnout model. Using the present furnace as a benchmark, the model will be used and calibrated in collaboration with testing by the Greenwood Technologies team. Whole wood is a highly desirable alternative fuel as it is renewable, domestically produced, low cost and abundantly available in many areas of the country. With the rapid increase of conventional home heating fuel prices, a growing number of people are turning to alternative fuels such as wood to reduce their reliance on high-priced fuels. By meeting Washington state's clean air wood burning standards through reducing particulate emissions from its furnace, Greenwood Technologies will open the door to a significantly broader market.

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Harmonics, Inc.

Seattle

Researcher: Dr. Thomas Stoebe, UW Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

Year project began: 2004

Ceramic coatings are potentially superior to conventional thick film and wire heating elements for many applications. These materials could fill a demand for compact, high-watt density, high-temperature resistive heating elements.

Harmonics, Inc. develops and commercializes innovative materials for energy conversion applications and pollution control. The company has invented, and partially developed, a proprietary electroconductive (EC) ceramic material that will be used, among other process applications, for heating elements. A key feature of Harmonics' materials is its proprietary processing capability centered on the casting of ceramic tapes ("tapecasting") and the engineering of multilayered composite ceramic structures.

This project pairs Harmonics' staff with Professor Stoebe to develop a screenprinting process for depositing EC material onto ceramic substrates that, after firing, will be suitable for use as high-temperature heating elements. These heating elements promise to deliver more heat per unit area, heat up more rapidly, and last longer than conventional metallic or thick film heating elements. Part of the research will be conducted in WTC's Microfabrication Lab.

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Head to Head

Snoqualmie

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Healionics Corporation

Redmond

http://www.healionics.com

Healionics in the WTC news forum

About Healionics Corporation
Healionics is a privately held biomaterials company founded on technology developed by Dr. Buddy Ratner and Dr. Andrew Marshall at the University of Washington Engineered Biomaterials center and licensed from UW. Our mission is to be the leading provider of tissue regeneration and device bio-integration solutions to healthcare manufacturers. The flagship STAR - Sphere Templated Angiogenic Regeneration - biomaterial scaffold is a paradigm shift in biocompatibility. Healionics Corporation is headquartered in Redmond, Washington. For more information, please visit http://www.healionics.com.

Research & Technology Development (RTD) Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Spherically Templated Angiogenic Regenerative (STAR) Materials for Reduced Infection and Improved Function of Percutaneous Devices"

Research Partner: Dr. Philip Fleckman, Professor of Medicine (Dermatology), Department of Medicine, University of Washington

Project Began: 2008

Healionics Corporation, a start-up biomaterials company in Redmond, is partnered with the University of Washington Department of Medicine to commercialize technology that will reduce infection from skin-breaching devices such as catheters.

UW will receive $82,500 in Phase I Research and Technology Development funding from Washington Technology Center and $16,500 from Healionics for the project titled "Spherically Templated Angiogenic Regenerative (STAR) Materials for Reduced Infection and Improved Function of Percutaneous Devices."

Medical devices that breach the skin play an essential role in patient care. They deliver drugs and fluids to the body and have a variety of other uses. However, because the body's natural barrier to disease is broken by these devices, patients are predisposed to bacterial infection. For example, infections from central venous catheters are attributed to more than 30,000 deaths per year in the U.S. alone. Despite the risks, the medical use of these devices is expected to grow.

In this Phase I project, UW Professor of Medicine Philip Fleckman plans to evaluate healing responses and bacterial reduction attained with a prototype catheter technology developed by Healionics. The prototype's use of precisely-engineered biomaterials could help to maximize skin healing and thus reduce the risk of infection. Additional studies should help Healionics bring this promising medical technology to market.

"We are very pleased WTC recognized the potential of our next generation STAR biomaterial scaffold technology to advance patient care and improve quality of life. We look forward to expanding our strong relationship with Dr. Fleckman and his team at the UW."

Max Maginness, Ph.D., Chief Technology Officer, Healionics

"We are excited about the opportunity to extend our studies of the biology of the interface of the skin with STAR materials and continue our collaboration with Healionics. The possibility of evolving this technology to a product that will help people by reducing morbidity while building the Washington state economy makes this a win-win project."

Dr. Philip Fleckman, Professor of Medicine, University of Washington

"I am so pleased with the quality of these research and development partnerships. The funds are clearly encouraging work with enormous potential to provide good jobs. Hospital-based infections are a growing problem, so this grant could have wide public benefit, too."

State Rep. Deb Eddy (D-Kirkland)

"I congratulate Healionics Corporation and the University of Washington research team for their technology to improve patient care. This kind of innovation not only helps Washington lead in global health, it helps to keep our local economy diversified and strong."

State Rep. Ross Hunter (D-Medina)

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Heartstream

Seattle

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HEATCON Composite Systems

Seattle

http://www.heatcon.com

About HEATCON® Composite Systems
HEATCON® Composite Systems, an ISO 9001:2000 company, has been involved in the support of advanced composite repairs since 1981. We are committed to continuous product improvement and development and our products set industry standards. We also strive to maintain the highest levels of quality and customer service. HEATCON® Composite Systems' customer base includes more major airlines, repair stations and military users than any other competitor. Most of our customers find it convenient and cost effective to obtain support of composite repairs from a single source. To meet this need our T. E. A. M. concept was developed. The very best in Training, Equipment, Accessories, and Materials are all available from HEATCON® Composite Systems. Visit www.heatcon.com, or call 206-575-1333, for more information.

RTD Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Pre-Repair Thermal Mapping and Leak Detection"

Research Partner: Professor Ashley Emery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington

Phase Began: 2009

HEATCON® Composite Systems, a Seattle-based composite repair equipment supplier, and The Boeing Company's Research & Technology group are collaborating with the University of Washington's Mechanical Engineering Department to improve the efficiency of composite-structural repairs.

UW will receive $75,190 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $20,000 from The Boeing Company for the project titled "Pre-Repair Thermal Mapping and Leak Detection."

The composite aircraft industry will be increasingly reliant on hot-bond composite repairs to keep its aircraft in service. In this project, the collaborative team of HEATCON®, Boeing and UW Professor Ashley Emery, will create a Pre-Repair Mapping System that assesses the thermal anomalies and vacuum leaks often associated with the repair of composite structures. Phase I will validate the viability of the system, while future phases will commercialize the system.

"We look forward to working with the University of Washington and HEATCON® in this important research, which we think will meet a key Boeing objective, which is to improve the maintainability of composite aircraft. One byproduct of this that we hope to achieve is a standardized process or method for pre-repair thermal mapping and leak detection. As well, this will provide a good opportunity for us to build on the strong relationship that we have with the UW and HEATCON®."

Megan Watson, Boeing Research & Technology lead engineer on the project

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Hummingbird Scientific

Lacey

http://www.hummingbirdscientific.com

Research & Technology Development (RTD) Award: Phase III

Project Title: "Development of an integrated microfluidics chamber for the transmission electron microscope"

Research Partner: Karl F. Böhringer, Ph.D., Professor, Electrical Engineering, University of Washington

Project Began: 2008

Hummingbird Scientific, a developer of microscopy products located in Lacey, Washington, is partnered with the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering to develop a system for nanoscale imaging of materials in fluid environments.

UW will receive $100,000 in Phase III Research and Technology Development funding from Washington Technology Center and $20,000 from Hummingbird Scientific for the project titled "Development of an integrated microfluidics chamber for the transmission electron microscope."

Research into the internal structure of evolving materials is leading to important advances in the fields of nanoscience, bioscience and materials chemistry. While current imaging technology enables nanoscale research of materials evolving under controlled temperatures, no imagery technique exists for materials evolving in fluid environments. A method for observing material changes in liquids could prove to be a core technology for a range of scientific advances, from developing efficient solar cells to targeting cancer cells.

Hummingbird Scientific and UW Professor Karl Böhringer will continue a working collaboration in this Phase III project. Using the resources of University of Washington and Washington Technology Center, the team plans to develop an imaging system for materials in liquid or gaseous environments evolving under precise temperature controls. This work should extend the team's previous developments for imaging technology that Hummingbird Scientific expects to bring to market in 2008.

"Congratulations to Hummingbird Scientific on their worthy project and on receiving this grant. The Legislature is always looking to invest in increasing Washington's commercialization capacity. Hummingbird Scientific's microscopy project represents great scientific innovation and great economic potential. It's a perfect example of research and industry working together in the Puget Sound to generate new high-tech ideas, get those ideas to market, and create 21st century jobs."

State Sen. Karen Fraser (D-Thurston County)

"The Washington Technology Center's recognition of Hummingbird Scientific's pioneering nanoscience is a wonderful example of a great partnership. This is the partnership of our private and public sectors cooperating toward advances in a wide range of scientific realms."

State Rep. Sam Hunt (D-Olympia), Chair of the House State Government & Tribal Affairs Committee

"I'm delighted to see the state and Hummingbird Scientific partner in shaping our state's economy of the future."

State Rep. Brendan Williams (D-Olympia).

RTD Award: Phase II

Project Title: "Development of a MEMS based Ultra High Temperature Heating Element for the TEM"

Research Partner: Karl Böhringer, Ph.D., Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington

Project Began: 2007

Hummingbird Scientific, a Lacey, Washington-based developer of microscopy solutions, has teamed with University of Washington electrical engineering researcher Karl Böhringer to develop an improved high temperature heating element for use in the transmission electron microscope - a development that will lead to scientific advancements across a range of scientific fields. The company-researcher team has received $100,000 in Research and Technology Development funding from Washington state for their project titled "Development of a MEMS-based Ultra-high Temperature Heating Element for the TEM." The most common dynamic microscopy experiments revolve around the relatively simple act of heating a sample, as temperature is often the primary thermodynamic driving force for microstructural change in materials processing. The current state of the art in heating and cooling holder design for transmission electron microscopy relies on substantially out-dated technologies, yielding significant problems in temperature control and expensive and time consuming maintenance. The development of a compact, efficient, low cost, ultra high temperature heating element is core to the advancement of high temperature materials science. Hummingbird Scientific and Karl Böhringer will take advantage of the unique resources at the University of Washington to develop an advanced heating holder technology - a technology that will add important research and development tools to the material science, bioscience and nanotechnology fields.

RTD Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Development of a MEMS based Ultra High Temperature Heating Element for the TEM"

Research Partner: Karl Böhringer, Ph.D., Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington

Project Began: 2006

Transmission electron microscopes (TEM) are one of the primary experimental tools used in nanotechnology and materials sciences. In order to effectively evaluate the performance of materials at the nano-scale in high temperature environments, it is necessary to observe samples at in-use temperatures. This project will be critical to achieving unprecedented high temperatures with superior resolution in the TEM. Hummingbird Scientific, a south Puget Sound company that supplies custom, cutting-edge equipment and services for electron and ion microscope applications, is working with Dr. Karl Böhringer, research professor in the University of Washington's electrical engineering department, to develop a high performance heating element for TEM experimentation. The development of new designs and manufacturing processes will strive to achieve a combination of competitive advantages including the ability to withstand ultra-high temperatures and a more efficient design conducive to cost-effective replacement and repair.

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Hyperion Innovations, Inc.

Seattle

Researchers: Wei Li and Ashley F. Emery, UW Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

Year project began: 2001

Every year, 20 million soldering irons are sold in the United States; most of these plug into an AC electrical outlet. Conventional soldering tools pass electricity through a heating element to generate heat that is conducted to the tip. This process is slow and inefficient, since only 2 percent of the generated heat is actually delivered to the solder.

Hyperion Innovations, a start-up company developing cordless heating tools and appliances, is designing a pocket-size soldering iron that promises to overcome these limitations with its proprietary Cold Heat technology. Hyperion's soldering iron omits the heating element and uses the solder itself to complete the electrical circuit, making the soldering iron compact and more efficient.

In traditional soldering irons, power output is controlled by the properties of the heating element and the iron. In Hyperion's iron, because electrical resistance changes as the tip gets hotter and the solder melts, power output is controlled by how easily electricity flows through the tip and the solder. As a result, heating is tailored to each job.

Working with Professors Wei Li and Ashley F. Emery of the University of Washington's Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hyperion is investigating the heating mechanism of its soldering iron and optimizing the size and shape of the tips in order to extend battery life. Hyperion is also testing a circuit that will regulate the power output of the soldering iron and make accurate output ratings possible.

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HyperLynx

Redmond

http://www.mentor.com/highspeed/products/hyperlynx/index.cfm?flow=vap

Researcher: Leung Tsang, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
Year project began: 2000

HyperLynx is a leading supplier of high-speed signal integrity, electromagnetic compatibility and crosstalk simulation products that are used by companies designing digital systems operating at frequencies above 1 GHz. This project proposes to develop advanced computational methods for predicting the effects of integrated-circuit packages on high-speed digital signals. The goal is to decrease system failure and improve performance in signal quality.

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IDmicro, Inc.

Tacoma

http://www.idmicro.com/

Researchers: Denise Wilson, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Doug St. John, UW Precision Forestry Cooperative

Year project began: 2001

Already successful with radio frequency identification (RFID) applications, IDMicro is working with the University of Washington to develop an application to be used in the forest products industry. In today's timber industry, tracking logs keep the high-value logs from being incorrectly categorized and shunted into a lower-value product stream. The UW team will develop an "injection gun" for inserting tags into trees, as well as investigate the feasibility of using electric and electromagnetic information for additional sensing and measurement.

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Impulse Accelerated Technologies

Kirkland

http://www.ImpulseAccelerated.com

About Impulse Accelerated Technologies, Inc.
Impulse Accelerated Technologies specializes in software-to-hardware compilation and verification tools. The Impulse CoDeveloper tools include C-to-FPGA optimization and hardware generation capabilities that are fully compatible with standard C development environments, and with widely-used FPGA design tools. Impulse products are used worldwide for applications that include embedded systems, video and image processing, digital signal processing, security, communications and high performance, FPGA-accelerated computing. For more information about Impulse and its products and services, visit www.ImpulseAccelerated.com or call 425-605-9543.

Research & Technology Development (RTD) Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Application and Benchmarking of Impulse C Technology to Medical Imaging Tasks"

Research Partner: Scott Hauck, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington

Project Began: 2008

Impulse Accelerated Technologies, Inc., a Kirkland-based developer of software-to-hardware tools, is working with the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering to create a research and development tool for the medical image processing community.

UW will receive $100,000 in Phase I Research and Technology Development funding from Washington Technology Center and $20,000 from Impulse for the project titled "Application and Benchmarking of Impulse C Technology to Medical Imaging Tasks."

Medical image processing is an important part of modern healthcare for analyzing internal anatomy and physiology. Imaging technology can help doctors diagnose diseases, optimize therapies and reduce the need for surgeries. Because it requires a great deal of computing resources to generate three-dimensional images from multiple scanning sources, medical imaging represents a significant computing challenge.

In this Phase I project, UW Associate Professor Scott Hauck and Impulse plan to extend and customize the company's CoDeveloper C-to-FPGA technology in support of medical imaging applications. The resulting software-to-hardware development system could make it easier for scientists and engineers to deploy high-performance medical image processing systems. These technical advancements to the Impulse tools could ultimately make medical imaging a faster and more accurate technology.

"We are excited to be working with Professor Hauck and his team to improve future healthcare. Hardware acceleration is a proven way to increase the processing throughput for medical imaging, and our combined research efforts will allow researchers to more quickly develop and deploy hardware-accelerated imaging systems."

David Pellerin, Co-founder and CEO, Impulse

"I am pleased with the quality of these research and development partnerships. These funds are clearly encouraging work with enormous potential to provide good jobs. Long-term, medical imaging could result in much better patient outcomes, substituting for expensive and risky surgery."

State Rep. Deb Eddy (D-Kirkland)

"Congratulations to Impulse Accelerated Technologies on winning a competitive grant with the University of Washington. Their joint technology development maximizes the state's investment in our research institutions and has potential for significant impact and job creation in Washington."

State Rep. Ross Hunter (D-Medina)

Research & Technology Development (RTD) Award: Phase I

Research Partner: Carl Ebeling, Ph.D., Department of Computer Science & Engineering, University of Washington

Project Began: 2004

This project will focus on developing key applications and creating additional hardware and software interfaces for a new set of design tools, specifically compilers, optimizers, and debuggers that allow software applications expressed in high-level languages to be compiled to Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). The commercial availability of these tools will benefit applications used in imaging, biomedical research, data communication, geophysics, data encryption, and signal processing.

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Infometrix, Inc.

Bothell

http://www.infometrix.com

RTD Award: Phase II

Project Title: "Robust Process Gas Chromatography"

Research Partners: Professor James B. Callis, Department of Chemistry, University of Washington; Mel Koch, Director, Center for Process Analytical Chemistry, University of Washington

Project Began: 2008

Infometrix, a Bothell-based developer of scientific software, is teamed with Professor James Callis of the University of Washington Department of Chemistry to develop software for improved process monitoring technology.

UW received $100,000 in Phase II Research and Technology Development funding from Washington Technology Center for the project titled "Robust Process Gas Chromatography."

Current use of Gas Chromatography (GC) as a process monitoring technology suffers from problems of cost, maintenance and deployment. By taking advantage of recent developments in instrumentation, data treatments and sampling systems, the utility of GC could be extended across a diverse cross section of industries.

In this Phase II project, Infometrix and Dr. Callis will extend their development of the base technologies by focusing on both practical deployment issues and implementation of real-time processing of GC data. By making gas chromatographers easier to deploy and maintain, Infometrix's work will lead to increased applications in sectors such as petroleum and biofuels, agriculture, biotechnology and the life sciences.

"I congratulate Infometrix on their project. It has seemingly limitless applications for areas in public policy and its work will lead to increased applications in sectors like petroleum and biofuels, agriculture, and biotechnology. State funding enables partnerships between companies and non-profit research institutions on technology projects with potential for commercializing and creating new jobs. It's also a great illustration of the public and private sectors teaming together for the next big breakthrough."

State Sen. Rosemary McAuliffe, (D-Bothell)

"Congratulations. I am very happy that state funding has been awarded to Infometrix, a Bothell company. Combined with the biotech cluster of businesses and institutions located in Seattle, Bothell has helped to make Washington State one of the top 5 or 6 biotech centers in the nation."

State Rep. Al O'Brien (D-Mountlake Terrace)

RTD Award: Phase I

Project Title: "Robust Process Gas Chromatography"

Research Partners: Jaromir Ruzicka, Ph.D. and Mel Koch, Ph.D., Center for Process Analytical Chemistry, University of Washington

Project Began: 2006

Process analytical instrumentation is a major business, generating $5 billion in corporate revenue annually. The chemical industry is clamoring for better performance for process analyzers - asking for smaller, modular, more technically-advanced components that can handle high volumes of data. Infometrix, a Bothell-based company, has teamed with Drs. Jaromir Ruzicka and Mel Koch with the University of Washington's Center for Process Analytical Chemistry (CPAC), to advance and improve the handling of data for sensors and other multivariate instrument systems. Gas chromatographs (GC) are the most common instruments used in monitoring and control. Infometrix and CPAC are looking to develop a robust GC that can be more easily integrated into the analysis process. This type of instrument is highly in demand in both laboratory analysis and for the commercial monitoring and control market. Infometrix has already received endorsement for this technology from several industry leaders including ExxonMobil, Chevron, Dow Chemical and Honeywell. Grant funding will be used to develop and build a prototype for commercial use by chemical and petroleum companies.

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Information Systems Laboratories

Seattle

Researcher: Denise Wilson, Associate Professor, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington

Project Year(s): 2005

Information Systems Laboratories, a science and engineering innovator in the fields of sensors, communications, and signal processing, is collaborating with Professor Wilson to develop a "tool kit" (hardware, simulation platform and design architecture) to enhance the simulation capability and performance quality of high-end sonar/acoustic processing systems. Despite extraordinary increases in digital signal processing speed and computing power over the last decade, the ability to interpret the complex characteristics of acoustic signals remains a challenge, especially in an underwater environment. The ISL/UW model seeks to exploit biological signal processing principles, in particular, the echolocation and functionality of one of the top underwater sonar communicators - the dolphin. The new toolkit is initially aimed at improving U.S. Navy sonar systems, which are currently designed to operate in the open ocean environment and are less accurate in underwater environments. However, the ISL solution will be designed to accommodate a broader market of acoustic signal processing systems.

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Insilicos

Seattle

http://www.insilicos.com

Insilicos in the WTC news forum

RTD Award: Phase II

Project Title: "Novel Diagnostic Test for Heart Disease (Phase II)"

Research Partner: Research Assistant Professor Tomas Vaisar, Department of Medicine, University of Washington

Project Began: 2008

Insilicos, a Seattle-based developer of life science software, is working with Dr. Tomas Vaisar, Research Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Washington, to develop a novel diagnostic test for heart disease. UW received $100,000 in Phase II Research and Technology Development funding from Washington Technology Center for the project.

An accurate way to predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is urgently needed. CVD is the leading cause of death in the United States. However, current tests for heart disease identify only one third of individuals at risk and thus myocardial infarction or sudden death are often the first indicators of the disease.

Insilicos has used mass spectrometry in conjunction with their proprietary pattern recognition software to analyze high density lipoprotein (HDL) and distinguish healthy subjects and subjects with CVD with high sensitivity and specificity.

In this Phase II project, Insilicos and Dr. Vaisar will extend their observations to large cohorts of subjects. The overall aim of these studies is to provide definitive evidence that analysis of HDL using mass spectrometry and pattern recognition analysis can identify subjects at risk for CVD. If successful, this discovery could lead to the development of a cost-effective, better-predictive diagnostic test for heart disease.

RTD Award: Phase I

Research Partner: Tomas Vaisar, Ph.D., University of Washington, School of Medicine

Project Began: 2006

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. Nearly one-quarter of all Americans has some form of CVD and six million patients are admitted to the hospital for treatment annually. High cholesterol is one of the well-known risk factors. Current diagnostic tests measure the ratio of different forms of cholesterol to determine individuals at risk for heart disease. However, these tests incorrectly diagnose about 70% of people at risk for the disease. Insilicos has developed software to more accurately analyze data obtained from analysis of plasma. The company is partnering with Dr. Vaisar at the University of Washington to develop a faster, more affordable diagnostic test using the company's software. Through this grant, the new tool will be tested in the clinical setting. Insilicos is also exploring the application of this novel diagnostic tool for use by physicians to diagnose and treat other medical issues, including diabetes.

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Intelligent Ion, Inc.

Seattle

http://www.intelligention.com/

Researcher: Dr. R. Bruce Darling, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering

Year project began: 2003

Intelligent Ion, Inc. develops products that improve the speed and usability of biological and chemical information. The company is building a new miniature mass spectrometer that will be 75 percent smaller (to fit on a large PC card) and significantly less expensive than existing systems. Under the direction of Professor Darling at the University of Washington, this project will research, design, and build the spectrometer's precise, ultra-small focusing system (electronic and physical optics). This new small, low-priced portable instrument will be usable across a broad range of applications that require immediate, accurate compositional analyses--including national security, law enforcement, and environmental monitoring.

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IntelliSense Inc. (ISI)

Indianola

Researcher: R. Bruce Darling, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering

The collaboration between ISI and the University of Washington will develop a new type of ion source for an ultra-miniature mass spectrometer. For use initially in providing real-time chemical analysis of air quality and process gas composition, this breakthrough instrument will be the smallest, lowest-cost, lowest-power consumption, fully functional instrument of its type on the market.

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Isotron Corp.

Redmond

http://www.isotron.net/

Researcher: Dr. Buddy Ratner, UW Engineered Biomaterials Center

Year project began: 2002

This team is developing a technology to provide semi-permeable reactive fabric coatings that can protect field troops, industrial workers, and healthcare workers in case of exposure to hazardous biological agents. This technology can also be applied to decontaminate drinking water systems. These industrial coatings are based on nanoparticle technology. Specifically, the company is working with Dr. Ratner to develop a new nanoparticle species that is capable of capturing and holding oxidant reactive species in a bioavailable state.

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Kronos Air Technologies, Inc.

Redmond

http://www.kronosati.com/

RTD Award: Phase III

Project Title: "Heat Transfer Technology for Microelectronics and MEMS, Phase III"

Research Partner: Alexander V. Mamishev, Ph.D., Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington

Project Began: 2007

Kronos Air Technologies, a Redmond-based developer of air movement and purification products, has teamed with University of Washington electrical engineering researcher Alexander V. Mamishev to develop a novel, energy-efficient electrostatic air pump that addresses the problem of thermal management in microelectronics. The company-researcher team has received $100,000 in Phase III Research and Technology Development funding from Washington state for their project titled "Heat Transfer Technology for Microelectronics and MEMS, Phase III." The problem of thermal management in microelectronics is at the center of attention for academia, government agencies and industry worldwide. The decreasing size of microelectronic components and the increasing thermal output density requires a dramatic increase of thermal exchange surface. Existing cooling devices are no longer efficient in terms of energy consumption and heat removal. The Electrostatic Fluid Acceleration (EFA) is an emerging technology that employs an electric field to exert force on ionized gas. Kronos Air Technologies has developed an improved version of EFA that makes it commercially viable as a solution to heat transfer. In Phase III, Kronos Air Technologies and Alexander V. Mamishev will focus on system integration, long-term testing and performance optimization of a micro-EFA heat exchanger. Ultimately, micro-EFA will become a natural inseparable part of any microelectronic device where heat transfer and withdrawal are necessary.

RTD Award: Phase II

Research Partner: Alexander V. Mamishev, Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, University of Washington

Project Began: 2006

As microelectronics evolve - getting smaller and more powerful - thermal management is becoming an ever more challenging issue. Cooling systems are pressured to keep pace with technology and meet increasing needs for better energy consumption and heat dissipation. Kronos Air Technologies, a Redmond-based subsidiary, is partnering with Dr. Alexander Mamishev and graduate students Nels Jewell-Larsen and Chi-Peng Hsu from the University of Washington's Electrical Engineering department to develop more advanced heat transfer technology for microelectronics. In previous research, Kronos and Mamishev developed a microchip-based air handling system with compact size, high speed airflow, and more targeted delivery of cooling to areas of highest heat. In this next phase, the team is looking to develop prototypes and define a fabrication process that optimizes mass production of the devices for the commercial market.

Researcher: Alexander Mamishev, University of Washington, Electrical Engineering Department

Project Began: 2004

Kronos Air Technologies, Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Kronos Advanced Technologies, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: KNOS). For this project, the company is teamed with Alexander Mamishev from the University of Washington's Electrical Engineering Department to develop a novel heat transfer technology for microelectronics. Thermal management for microelectronics and MEMS systems is a challenge. Existing cooling devices aren't meeting increasing needs for energy consumption and heat dissipation of this rapidly growing and evolving market. Kronos' air movement system is an emerging technology that uses an electric field to exert force on ionized gas. Kronos is looking to develop an improved air handling system that is smaller in size, has high speed airflow, allows more targeted delivery of cooling to areas of highest heat and is compatible with current processes. This new microchip system will help the semiconductor industry meet the demands of the next generation of microelectronics devices.

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