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News Forum

Technology-Based Economic Development is Key to Washington's Future

By Lee Cheatham, executive director of Washington Technology Center

It's no secret that technology and innovation are at the heart of sustainable economic growth.

An "innovation economy" affords a quality lifestyle –- abundant career options, high wage jobs, globally competitive companies, and increased wealth in the region.

This innovation economy is possible for Washington.

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We have world-class universities and research centers. We have internationally-recognized industry leaders such as Boeing, Microsoft, Starbucks, TMobile and Amazon.com.

We have a large pool of home-grown entrepreneurs and continue to hold the number one position nationally in new company creation.

But we cannot afford to be complacent –- to simply hope we do well. We can't expect to continue to reap the benefits of our good fortune without nurturing it. We must be aggressive in capitalizing on and investing in our strengths, especially those of innovation and technology. How do we do this? I suggest four key strategies:

One: Integrate Technology Based Economic Development into Traditional Economic Development Planning Processes.
Economic planning has always been about market development and trade; tourism and recruitment; tax policy and regulation. It also includes affordable housing, growth management and transportation. Today, innovation and technology must share as equals to these "traditional" areas. New products, business models, and education paradigms based on technology breakthroughs are critical.

Some of our state's leaders are already taking this approach. Puget Sound's Prosperity Partnership exemplifies this view. The more than 1000 people involved are examining new technologies along with tax policy and environmental sustainability. The Tri-Cities Community Roundtable is integrating traditional economic issues like tourism, transportation and water use with research and education through an on-going civic dialogue. Spokane is developing both recruitment and growth strategies supported by a number of organizations around technology businesses, research and health care.

Two: Encourage Early-Stage Investment
Putting innovation and technology on the agenda means making an investment. We must make Washington a preferred place to do business. At a time when it's easy to locate business operations anywhere in the world, Washington must be among the winners for global capital investment. Early stage investment is the most critical need for companies in their growth period. Their research is finished, but the market prospects are too uncertain for venture or operating capital investment. Bridging this gap is imperative to ensure we don't lose these high-potential businesses to failure or relocation.

Programs that channel public investment are one solution. The Investing in Innovation Program created by the Washington Legislature in 2003 is a good example. This program will allocate funds for the most promising technology commercialization ideas. Federal Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants are another exceptional source of early capital. Washington's companies have proven to be successful at SBIR, attracting more than $45 million in 2004. But over $1.4B is available annually for these awards. Encouraging more of our companies to pursue this funding is an important public service.

Three: Support Major Industry Initiatives
Washington has the advantage of both large, globally-dominant industry clusters (aerospace, software) and emerging ones (life sciences, energy, nanotechnology). This mix can lead to an economy that is strong today and strong tomorrow.
In order to ensure this long-term advantage, we must each understand the needs and opportunities these sectors offer. The Life Sciences Development Initiative, Northwest Energy Technology Collaborative, and Washington Nanotechnology Initiative all represent statewide efforts to strengthen our core industries. We must drive these initiatives to success – and continue to develop new ones. A balance of current and emerging industries is our best recipe for sustainable economic well-being.

Four: Support Community-Based Efforts to Build Technology Economies
To repurpose a well-known phrase: "All economic development is local." While the goal in every community is the same, the strengths, needs, and interests of the people are unique. Our collective challenge is to support each of these communities in developing their plan while ensuring it has every chance of success. These plans must answer common questions. Do local companies have access to global markets? Is capital available? Does the workforce have the skills needed? Do new research and business ideas flow freely?

Washington's communities exhibit strong potential for growth in their dominant industries. In Bellingham and Vancouver, industry clusters are forming, favorable levels of new company formation occur, active research centers exist –- their innovation economies are flourishing. Providing the means for these communities, and others across the state, to implement their plans for capitalizing on their strengths by engaging civic leaders is an integral part of achieving Washington's overall technology-based economic development strategy.

It is not enough to want Washington to succeed. We also have to do the hard work and make the hard decisions. I refer to this a replacing "hope" with "how." Innovation and technology must be as integral to the process as industry and business development if Washington is to realize its full economic potential.

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WTC Releases 2005 Index of Innovation & Technology

Washington Technology Center (WTC) recently released its 2005 Washington Index of Innovation and Technology. Compiled and published annually by WTC, the Index includes a comprehensive set of indicators that examine both national and regional data.

The publication serves as a resource for Washington's industry leaders and policymakers to help evaluate and shape strategies that encourage and support sustainable economic development statewide and provide a springboard for promoting Washington's competitive strengths on a national basis.

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From the Index, trends emerge that create a roadmap for shaping our state's future. Washington continues to provide a strong foundation for entrepreneurship and is well-positioned to grow and sustain a technology economy:

* Washington continues to be an innovation state. For the fifth consecutive year Washington led the nation in new company creation. More of our companies are experiencing success. Washington moved from first to third among states for rate of company closures.

* Patent activity remains strong. Over 1,400 technology patents were generated, an increase of 8 percent from the previous year. Pullman exhibited the highest rate of patenting per capita.

* Software development, a major industry in Washington, saw increases in employment and national dominance. Conversely, the state's other major industry, aerospace, saw decreases in both.

* New data shows venture capital funding increasing in the Northwest. This is a welcome trend following the strains from the previous years' recession. Washington's national position remained the same.

* Investment in biotechnology doubled. Biotechnology showed a dramatic increase this year in venture capital investment – accounting for 15 percent of all investment.

* Workforce measures show cause for concern. For the first time in years, fewer than 90 percent of Washington residents had a high school diploma.

* Housing affordability improved. Higher incomes balanced out housing prices and, for the first time in years, Seattle area average housing prices were below the national average.

* Most communities showed growth in their core technology sectors. Eleven out of the 12 regions showed growth in at least one of their core technology industries. Bellingham, Pullman and Tri-Cities experienced growth in all three of their top technology industries.

The 2005 Index received sponsorship support from the following regional partner organizations: INTEC, Spokane Area EDC, enterpriseSeattle, Kitsap Regional Economic Development Center and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. WTC would like to thank these partners for helping underwrite the costs of producing the report.

Schedule WTC to Speak at Your next Meeting on Regional Index Measures
WTC books speaking engagements around the state on the Index of Innovation & Technology and what the statistical trends mean with respect to building and maintaining a technology-based economy in Washington's communities and the state as a whole. WTC Executive Director, Lee Cheatham, is available to present at meetings, conferences, and seminars. Presentations can be tailored specifically for your audience.

Related WTC links:

  • 2005 Washington Index of Innovation and Technology

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  • Microfabrication Lab Celebrates 10th Anniversary

    A May 19, 2005 symposium commemorates a decade of process development and production for emerging industries.

    Washington Technology Center's Microfabrication Laboratory is celebrating a decade of being the Pacific Northwest's largest public MEMS laboratory dedicated to R&D; and prototype manufacturing.

    WTC will be hosting a 10th Anniversary Symposium on May 19, 2005 from 1 to 6:30 p.m. in Seattle. This informational and networking event offers a unique opportunity to explore the latest developments in micro-fabrication and see first-hand how a public facility of this type is helping accelerate the adoption of new technologies into the marketplace.

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    The symposium will feature a keynote presentation by Marlene Bourne, Vice President of Research and Principal Analyst for Small Times Media, the leading source of business information, technological advances, applications and investment opportunities regarding micro and nanotechnology.

    The program will also feature a panel of academic and industry researchers who have used the lab's resources to launch innovative new products into the commercial marketplace. Panelists include Dwayne Dunaway, Nanostring Technologies; Jason Tauscher, Microvision; Andrea Tombros, PCB Piezotronics; Babak Parviz, Electrical Engineering, University of Washington.

    Additional highlights include:

    * Presentations regarding access to public facilities for technology R&D; and state and federal grant programs that can help fund early-stage technology R&D.;

    * An overview of the Microfab Lab's capabilities and tours of the facility and a showcase of local companies that have launched products out of MEMS research.

    * Networking, vendor showcase, and hosted reception.


    Registration:
    1:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
    HUB Auditorium
    UW Campus, Seattle, WA

    Symposium
    1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
    HUB Auditorium
    UW Campus, Seattle, WA

    Lab Tour & Hosted Reception:
    5:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
    Washington Technology Center Fluke Hall,
    UW Campus, Seattle, WA

    As of spring 2005, WTC's Microfabrication Laboratory has more than 260 registered users worldwide. The lab serves academic and industry clients working on new technological advances in such areas as electronics, power, optics, medical technology, digital imaging, aerospace, telecommunications, and military.

    The diverse products that have come out of the Microfabrication Laboratory include MEMS-based bar code scanners, fuel cells for laptops and cell phones, bio screening devices, bio-compatible implants, laser guidance systems, high power diode lasers, digital switches, and micro-filtration systems. The symposium will highlight some of these innovative technologies to come out of the lab over the past decade.

    To Register
    There is no cost to attend the Microfabrication Lab 10th Anniversary Symposium. However, a donation of $25 is strongly encouraged. All donations will be used to support economic development & job growth for entrepreneurs in Washington state.

    Related WTC links:

  • WTC Microfabrication Laboratory

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  • Looking Back at a Decade of Process Excellence

    The Washington Microfabrication Laboratory Provides Researchers with an Affordable Way to Create Custom Process Work for Cutting Edge Technology Solutions

    Ten years ago, the potential of MEMS to revolutionize semiconductor and advanced materials manufacturing created a buzz among technology researchers. Finding ways to integrate new micro-technologies into commercial operations was at the forefront of R&D; efforts worldwide. Access to facilities to conduct novel research and technology development and produce small-runs of prototypes topped the list of entrepreneurs' needs at the earliest stage of their growth.

    Washington Technology Center (WTC), the organization responsible for driving technology-based economic development in Washington State, saw MEMS' potential and what it could mean for the Pacific Northwest. In 1995, WTC opened a 15,000 square foot Microfabrication Laboratory in Seattle to provide a unique R&D; environment for MEMS research.

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    Here's a look back at the first ten years.

    A new standard of research
    WTC's Microfabrication Laboratory is the largest public Microfabrication facility in the northwestern region of the United States. The lab offers processes and tools for depositing, removing, patterning and characterizing materials at the micron level and serves both academic and industry clients.

    In its first year of operation, WTC's Microfabrication Laboratory client base was about 50 users. As of Spring 2005, the Lab has more than 260 registered users representing 55 university research groups and 44 private industry firms,
    from 13 U.S. states and Canadian provinces, and Washington is one of the top regions in the U.S. in MEMS technology. WTC attributes this success to three key selling points:

    Affordable Access: The Microfab Lab caters to smaller, innovative companies, providing them with a resource they otherwise could not afford in the earliest stages of their growth. Clients pay a monthly fee for unlimited access to the facility. Part-time and contract rates are also available. Cost savings can be substantial. One client was quoted $600,000 from a commercial foundry fora project. The same process using WTC's Microfab Lab was $150,000.

    Process Control: One of the top selling features of the Microfab Lab is that clients maintain full control of their intellectual property and processes. For companies with emerging technologies, it's crucial that they have the abilityto do the process development hands-on. Many fabrication facilities can't or won't accommodate this type of specialization. WTC's Microfabrication Laboratory does.

    One-Stop Shopping: The Microfab Lab allows users to do multiple, custom processes under one roof. The facility features equipment and processes in the areas of MEMS, Nanotechnology, Photonics and Microfluidics with process capabilities in photolithography, metrology, etching, thin film processing, high temperature processing and back end processing. These comprehensive services prevent researchers from having to contract with multiple labs or foundries which can be costly, time consuming and affect process consistency and control. Professional full-time staff are available to train clients on the equipment and perform contract work.

    One client summed it up perfectly when he referred to the Microfab Lab as a functional arm to their company's research division without the burdens of maintaining their own facility.

    The first ten years of the Microfabrication Laboratory's operations proved a monumental decade in opening doors for new MEMS technologies to enter the market. The Microfab Lab is marking this milestone with a 10th Anniversary Symposium on May 19, 2005 in Seattle. This event will feature presentations on topics related to academic and industry research, an overview of the Lab's capabilities and tours of the facility, and showcase of lab clients that have successfully launched products out of MEMS research.

    The symposium will also look at new opportunities in technology research, including nanotechnology, touted as the next revolution in miniaturization, and how the Microfab Lab will be preparing to be a center of innovation for this new enabling technology.

    What Clients are Saying about the Microfab Lab

    "Having access to fully-functioning fabrication resources through WTC is enormously valuable to us. The MicroFab Lab offers a controlled environment, which is critical, and we aren't burdened with building these facilities ourselves or dividing our time among labs that only provide a portion of the functionality. As a result, we were able to move to market faster with a more stable, reliable product."
    – Matt Nichols, Microvision

    "It makes economic sense for our company to take advantage of the equipment and resources at the Microfab Lab. The lab provides us with all the tools we need in one location and we can concentrate our capital resources on our company's growth."
    – Gregg Makuch, Neah Power Systems

    "When we go to a commercial foundry, they don't want to tell us details of the process they are doing. When we're at WTC, we can know every detail of the process. It's our process, we own it."
    – Andrea Tombros, PCB Piezotronics

    Related WTC links:

  • WTC Microfabrication Laboratory

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  • Washington State Innovation Assessment

    This study presents a framework for future research and development investments by the state in areas critical to Washington's technology-based economic future.

    Related WTC links:

  • Read the WSIA Report [PDF]

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  • State Leadership Sets Stage for Nanotech Growth in Washington

    Scientific discoveries at the molecular and atomic level are beginning to fundamentally alter the way businesses will build and deliver products. Local government, research and business leaders realize that the stakes for Washington State are high. Many of our major industries -- aerospace, life sciences, energy, electronics -- are poised to see the earliest disruptive changes from nanotech within the next decade.

    To realize this potential, significant research and recruiting investments in nano-scale science and engineering development are essential.

    Washington Technology Center (WTC), the state's technology-based economic development agency, will launch the Washington Nanotechnology Initiative (WNI) at the Washington Technology Summit on April 8 at the Bell Harbor Conference Center in Seattle. WNI creates a framework for pursuing actions that foster the nano-preparedness of Washington's economy.

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    "Washington State has a solid foundation in nano research and Washington technology companies are already seeing the impact it has on market potential," says Lee Cheatham, executive director of the Washington Technology Center. "The goal of the WNI is to leverage nanotechnology to our state's competitive advantage. The results of which will be a stronger economy, increased capital investment in Washington companies, and more jobs," Cheatham says.

    The WTC has published a report outlining a six-step action agenda which will serve as the work plan for the WNI in the coming years. These steps include:
    * Establishment of bold new discovery programs in key industry sectors
    * Recruitment of high-profile nano scientists to our research and commercial organizations
    * Development of a collaborative, interactive nano business community with increased visibility and recognition worldwide
    * Creation of applied nanotech engineering development centers
    * Develop and fund integrated nano research at universities
    * Development of training programs to assure that our workforce has appropriate nanotechnology skills when needed

    Related WTC links:

  • Read the WNI Report [PDF]

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  • Facility Focus: What's New at the Microfabrication Laboratory

    Optical profiling equipment and training available
    The Microfabrication Laboratory is pleased to announce that it has recently acquired WYCO NT 3300 optical profiling equipment. This equipment provides a versatile measurement solution for nano-scale resolution on micromachined devices. This system is currently installed and fully functional and training on the WYCO is available from professional laboratory staff.

    New Laminar Flood Hood Improves Cleanroom Yield
    The Microfabrication Laboratory recently purchased and installed a new laminar flood hood in the cleanroom. The hood has improved air quality significantly and should be instrumental in reducing defects from airborne particles in the thin film processing area.

    Related WTC links:

  • WTC Microfabrication Laboratory

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  • Capabilities of Lab Help Client Attract Interest

    Success can come in many forms for small technology companies. For Zeus Semiconductor, an early-stage company working on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor technology, this success came in the form of acquisition by Advanced Power Technology.

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    Zeus had been a client of the Washington Technology Center's Microfabrication Laboratory since February 2002. Prior to being acquired by APT in September, Bruce Odekirk was doing research at WTC's Microfabrication Laboratory on the use of silicon carbide semiconductors for power components.

    While working for Zeus, Odekirk used the Microfab Lab facilities three to four times a week and did the process development in person on-site at the lab. Due to the cutting-edge nature of the technology, being able to have hands-on control of the process development was a critical factor and the main attraction for Zeus in deciding to house a portion of their R&D; activities at the Microfab Lab. According to Odekirk, similar facilities weren't equipped to handle the level of control needed for the type of R&D; that they were undertaking.

    WTC looks at this acquisition as a win as well. The work Zeus was able to conduct at the WTC facility played a role in making their technology attractive to APT.

    Odekirk concurs that the Lab's capabilities were a key factor in allowing Zeus to progress to a level in their technology development that did catch the attention of APT. "It was while working at WTC's Microfab Lab that we realized the real market potential for this technology was in power components," Odekirk explained. "We were able to successfully fabricate our first prototype," he added. "And the work we were doing was applicable to APT's technology needs in power electronics."

    Odekirk was retained by APT as director of silicon carbide engineering. He still works closely with Marc Vandenberg, former president of Zeus, who joined APT's management team as director of silicon carbide programs. While APT's facilities allow their engineers to do much of the lab work in-house, Odekirk noted that "The WTC Microfab Lab has some specialized capabilities that may be useful to the company in the future."

    Advanced Power Technology is a leading supplier of high performance power semiconductors used in the conditioning and control of electrical power for both switching and RF applications. APT's products are designed to power next generation high power systems for servers, computers, high capacity mass storage products, cellular base stations for telecommunications, and industrial applications such as advanced medical imaging systems, lasers, semiconductor process equipment, and arc welders, as well as military and aerospace power systems.

    The company has operations in Bend, Oregon, Santa Clara, California, Montgomeryville, Pennsylvania, and Bordeaux, France. The Bend, Oregon operation focuses on Discrete Power Semiconductor products.

    Related WTC links:

  • Zeus Semiconductor is a WTC client
  • WTC Microfabrication Laboratory

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  • Microfabrication Laboratory welcomes new clients

    WTC is pleased to welcome American Semiconductor, Voxtel, and NanoString Technologies as new industrial users to the Microfabrication Laboratory.

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    American Semiconductor, Inc., Boise, Idaho
    American Semiconductor (ASI) recently developed a collaborative relationship with the Washington Technology Center for use of the WTC Microfabrication Laboratory and its equipment. American Semiconductor is a fabless developer of semiconductor process solutions for low-power, RF, analog and digital integrated circuits resolving CMOS technology limitations for next generation scaling of advanced microelectronics. As a pure-play foundry for wafer fabrication and advanced process development, ASI's focus is on foundry and custom process development support for fabless and IDM commercial organizations and research institutions. In addition to foundry services, American Semiconductor is active in advanced technology research supported by agencies such as the U.S. Department of Defense. ASI utilizes the Microfab Lab process tools for a number of development projects including photo diode and biosensor fabrication. ASI recently completed a major milestone in the development of the patent pending Flexfet™ silicon-on-insulator (SOI) CMOS technology with an impressive prototype demonstration.

    NanoString Technologies, Seattle, WA
    NanoString™ Technologies is developing a patent-pending nanotechnology-based platform for high speed, completely automated, robust, highly multiplexed, single molecule identification and digital quantification. This breakthrough has the potential to become a biological operating system on which any biomolecular analysis application can be developed. The NanoString™ system uniquely barcodes each individual target molecule, scans them, and delivers a literal inventory of single molecules in the biological sample. Applications include gene expression analysis, genotyping, proteomics, clinical diagnostics and, in the future, predictive, preventative, and personalized medicine. Nanostring will be using the Microfab Lab to prototype microfluidic devices in a variety of materials.

    Voxtel, Inc., Beaverton, Oregon
    Voxtel is a global leader in photonic devices and systems. Headquartered in Beaverton, Oregon, the company specializes in developing and commercializing advanced detectors, imaging devices, and electro-optical systems including avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and photon counting modules, high speed, radiation hardened CMOS imaging sensors, laser radar receivers and systems, multi-spectral imaging systems, wavefront sensors, and infrared radiometric imaging systems. Voxtel is using the Microfab Lab's low-stress PECVD silicon nitride process for mesa APD sidewall passivation.

    Related WTC links:

  • American Semiconductor is a WTC client
  • NanoString Technologies is a WTC client
  • Voxtel is a WTC client

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  • Northwest Energy Technology Showcase (NETS), 8/23/2005, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

    This showcase highlights the latest technologies and commercial products from emerging northwest energy companies. NETS offers energy entrepreneurs the rare opportunity to talk about who they are, what they do, how they do it, and the overall benefits to utilities and the energy sector as a whole.

    Register before June 30 and attend the entire conference for $125. Regular admission is $150.

    Related WTC links:

  • NWETC.com

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  • EnVenture Northwest, 8/22/2005, 1:30 - 4:30 p.m.

    Energy technology companies can take advantage of this exclusive opportunity to present their business plan directly to equity investors. The selected companies will undergo screening and coaching by an expert panel of angel investors and venture capitalists prior to this high-caliber forum.

    Related WTC links:

  • NWETC.com

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  • SBIR Funding for Energy R&D;, 8/22/2005, 8 a.m. - Noon

    The Department of Energy awards $95 million in funding each year to companies working on energy-related technology research & development. This half-day workshop helps companies understand how federal Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) programs work and how to apply for funding.

    Related WTC links:

  • WTC SBIR Program

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  • Regional Academic Forum, 8/22/2005, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

    A platform for academic researchers and industry leaders to discuss strategic partnerships and R&D; initiatives relating to the region's emerging energy sector.

    Related WTC links:

  • NWETC.com

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  • Northwest Energy Symposium -- August 22-23, 2005

    August 22-23, 2005
    Doubletree Hotel, Lloyd Center
    Portland, Oregon

    A 'power' ful look at the Pacific Northwest's most promising new energy technologies. Find out what it takes to fuel innovation in this emerging market. The Northwest Energy Symposium is a comprehensive conference offering programs on research activities, private investment, and government funding opportunities to accelerate energy industry development.

    Related WTC links:

  • NWETC.com

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  • Nanotechnology in the Pacific Northwest -- July 15, 2005

    July 15, 2005
    8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    Westin Hotel, Seattle, WA

    Washington Technology Center (WTC), Pacific Northwest Economic Region (PNWER) and Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI) are co-hosting a daylong forum, Nanotechnology in the Pacific Northwest, during the 15th Annual PNWER Summit this summer in Seattle. This day-long conference is dedicated to exploring regional efforts and development trends around nanotechnology in the Northwest. The Annual Pacific Northwest Economic Region (PNWER) summit is the largest regional gathering of elected officials, attracting more than 400 legislators from five U.S. states and western Canada. Come learn about the latest advancements in nanotechnology, opportunities for collaboration and strategic partnerships and local initiatives surrounding this emerging technology.

    Cost to attend the PNWER Conference is $395 before June 11, 2005 and $450 on June 12, 2005. Cost to attend just the Nanotech session is $185 before June 11, 2005. The price increases to $225 on June 12, 2005. Registration fee includes breakfast and opening plenary session by keynote speaker, Governor Christine Gregoire.

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    2005 Micro Nano Breakthrough Conference -- July 25-28, 2005

    Gathering to Build a Micro/Nano Tech Economy
    July 25-28, 2005
    University Place Conference Center, Portland, OR

    The 2005 Micro Nano Breakthrough Conference brings together leaders in research, education, technology development, industry, government, business, and venture capital investments to focus on development of micro and nano technology for new products. The conference attracts nearly 400 attendees to share ideas and findings, build collaborative networks, participate in working groups, exhibit commercial technologies and services, and help set agendas for developing new microproducts.The Micro/Nano Breakfthrough Conference is a collaborative effort of the Microproducts Breakthrough Institute, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnology Initiative (ONAMI), University of Washington (UW), Oregon State University (OSU), Portland State University (PSU), University of Oregon (UO), and Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU). Cost to attend the Micro Nano Conference is $150. Pre-conference courses on July 25, 2005 range between $50 and $100.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Micro Nano Breakthrough Conference

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  • The 2005 Financing Roadmap: Evaluating Your Options -- April 28, 2005

    April 28, 2005
    8:00 am to 4:30 pm
    PNNL, Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory
    902 Battelle Blvd., Richland, Washington

    This workshop is designed to help startups, early-stage firms, and companies with growth potential will learn about a range of financing methods including equity capital, debt financing, partnerships, and license agreements. The morning session takes a case study approach to looking at ways to raise outside equity investment capital. This session addresses such issues as finding angel investors, creating and delivering an angel investor pitch, and dealing with ongoing investor relations. Advanced Imaging Technologies, an early-stage medical imaging startup based in Richland will be profiled. During a catered lunch, a panel of experts will discuss their experiences and perspectives in funding and partnering with smaller companies. The afternoon focuses on non-equity forms of fundraising, especially for young or small companies. Cost to attend is $49, including lunch and materials.

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    SBIR/STTR Breakfast Seminar SBIR/STTR Breakfast Seminar -- April 21, 2005

    April 21, 2005
    7:30 to 9:00 a.m.
    Washington Club
    University of Washington Campus, Seattle, WA

    Steve Meginniss, President of Magic Wheels, will share his experience in leveraging his initial Phase I and Phase II funding into an additional Competing Continuation Grant. Magic Wheels received their Phase 1 in 1998, Phase II in 2002, with a continuation grant awarded in 2004 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. He will describe the program, keys to success, and how to leverage your connection with a program officer. The Competing Continuation Phase II Grants are available up to $1 million/year for each of three years, for a potential total of $3 million above and beyond a company's initial Phase I and Phase II awards. Funding is selectively offered by various institutes such as the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLB), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and several others. Purposes of funding are for clinical trials of various types and studies to meet FDA approvals are a few of the purposes supported under the Competing Continuation Grants. Cost to attend this breakfast seminar is $40 includes breakfast and program materials.

    Related WTC links:

  • WTC's SBIR Program
  • Magic Wheels is a WTC client

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  • SBIR 101: An Introduction to Federal Research Funding Awards -- April 20, 2005

    April 20, 2005
    1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
    Sirti Offices, 665 N. Riverpoint Blvd., Spokane, WA

    WTC's introductory workshop on the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program is coming to Spokane, Washington. If you are an entrepreneur interested in learning more about how your company can benefit from federal funding for R&D; projects, you won't want to miss this informative session. The federal government sets aside $1.8 billion annually in Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding for companies who seek financial assistance with technology research and production development. Your company may be eligible to receive up to $850,000 in federal R&D; funding. In this seminar, professionals knowledgeable about the SBIR process will walk you through the basics of what it takes to win one of these competitive grants. Cost to attend SBIR 101 is $40 and includes breakfast and program materials.

    Related WTC links:

  • WTC SBIR Program

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  • Moving your R&D; Forward: Tapping into Government Funds for Energy Technology Projects -- April 20, 2005

    April 20, 2005
    8:00 am to noon
    Sirti, 665 N. Riverpoint Blvd., Spokane, WA

    The U.S Department of Energy awards $95 million in funding each year to companies who seek financial assistance with technology research and product development. Your company may be eligible to receive federal R&D; funding for your energy research projects from agencies like the Department of Energy and EPA. The Northwest Energy Technology Collaborative (NWETC) in partnership with the Washington Technology Center (WTC) is hosting a workshop on April 20, 2005 in the Spokane area that provides valuable insight into navigating the path towards securing government funds for energy R&D; projects. Speakers include representatives from Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Agency. Cost to attend is $45 and includes program materials.

    Related WTC links:

  • WTC SBIR Program

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  • WTC Signs Strategic Alliance Agreement with U.S. Small Business Administration

    Washington Technology Center (WTC) has entered into a formal Strategic Alliance Memorandum (SAM) with the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) to form a close strategic alliance with the goal of stimulating economic development in both rural and urban areas of Washington State.

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    WTC has been collaborating with SBA on a partnership level for some time to provide support and resources to entrepreneurial technology ventures throughout the state. The SAM steps up this activity to create a wider network of services to these companies.

    Through this agreement, WTC will collaborate with the SBA's Seattle District Office on issues and programs that benefit and promote small business development including access to capital, technical assistance, women's business, and advocacy and will combine efforts to cross promote the various programs of each agency.

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    Rivetek Receives Industry Achievement Award

    Rivetek, Inc., Bellingham, WA, was awarded the 2005 Industry Achievement Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Community from the Washington Software Alliance. The company was honored for its commitment to providing ongoing educational partnerships for all employees to encourage life-long learning and to encourage others in the community to develop industry skills. Robin Halliday, Rivetek's Chief Executive Officer, serves on WTC's Board of Directors and has been actively involved in WTC's community outreach and entrepreneur programs in Bellingham.

    Lockheed Martin Information Technology was one of the three finalists in this same category. Frank Armijo, Director of the Hanford Program for Lockheed Martin Information Technology in Richland, Washington, also serves on WTC's Board of Directors.

    Related WTC links:

  • WTC's current board of directors

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