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IsoRay announces a distribution agreement in Canada and another with GE subsidiary Oncura

IsoRay, Inc., a Richland-based developer of therapies for prostate and other cancers, has announced two new distribution agreements. Inter V Medical of Montreal, Quebec, Canada will have exclusive rights to sell Cesium-131 Brachytherapy seeds in Canada. GE Subsidary, Oncura will distribute the I-125 brachytherapy seed, OncoSeed™.

In a press release, Dwight Babcock, Chairman and CEO stated, "By adding I-125 seeds to our prostate product offering we can now be a full service provider to our customers. OncoSeed brings with it a substantial and well documented track record of efficacy. While we believe that Cesium-131 adds an important new dimension to brachytherapy for a variety of anatomic sites including prostate, we see strategic value in supporting our customers that have not yet converted all their practice to Cesium-131."

Related external links (will open a new window):

  • IsoRay, Inc. Announces Iodine Distribution Agreement with GE Subsidary, Oncura
    IsoRay - Richland, Wash. - December 3, 2009
  • IsoRay, Inc. Announces Distribution Agreement in Canada
    IsoRay - Richland, Wash. - November 18, 2009

    Related WTC links:

  • IsoRay is a WTC client
  • IsoRay announces world's first Cesium-131 lung implants
    Posted 11/05/2009
  • IsoRay announces first head and neck cancer treated with Cesium-131
    Posted 8/07/2009
  • IsoRay receives approval to market cancer therapy in Canada
    Posted 5/12/2009
  • IsoRay signs distribution agreement for prostate brachytherapy product
    Posted 2/19/2009

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    IsoRay announces world's first Cesium-131 lung implants

    IsoRay, Inc., a Richland-based developer of therapies for prostate and other cancers, has announced that the world's first Cesium-131 lung implants have been performed at Cornell Medical Center.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • IsoRay announces world's first Cesium-131 lung implants performed at Cornell Medical Center
    IsoRay - Richland, Wash. - October 27, 2009

    Related WTC links:

  • IsoRay is a WTC client
  • IsoRay announces first head and neck cancer treated with Cesium-131
    Posted 8/07/2009
  • IsoRay receives approval to market cancer therapy in Canada
    Posted 5/12/2009
  • IsoRay signs distribution agreement for prostate brachytherapy product
    Posted 2/19/2009

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    WTC wins national award for tech-based economic development

    Washington Technology Center's state-funded Research and Technology Development Program was honored by SSTI for outstanding achievement in technology-based economic development.


    SEATTLE - October 22, 2009 - Washington Technology Center was named one of six recipients of The State Science and Technology Institute's 2009 Excellence in TBED awards for initiating successful programs to sustain the nation's position as a global leader for innovation and competitiveness. WTC's Research and Technology Development (RTD) Program was honored as a best-practice model for demonstrating leadership and meaningful impact to state and regional economies.

    "The Washington Technology Center's RTD Program stands out because of the substantial impact it has achieved from its persistent assistance to Washington companies over 17 years. Impressively, the RTD Program's more than 330 funded projects have resulted in almost a half-billion dollars in follow-on support from private and federal sources," said Dan Berglund, SSTI President and CEO.

    "This award recognizes the effectiveness of our staff and partners' research commercialization efforts," said Lee Cheatham, Ph.D., executive director of Washington Technology Center. "We're pleased that Washington is receiving national attention for efficiently delivering economic development services, specifically by leveraging state dollars to create new job opportunities in advanced technology."

    "Successes such as this are possible only because of the support of the Washington State Legislature and our research institution partners, and the commitment of our all-volunteer Board of Directors and Advisory Committees," said Cheatham.

    WTC's Research and Technology Development Program awards $1 million in applied research funding each year to teams comprised of companies and researchers in the state of Washington. The grant program helps move innovative ideas out of the laboratory and into the commercial marketplace.

    "WTC's RTD program fills an important gap," said Rick Luebbe, CEO of EnerG2, a Seattle-based startup company that has recently raised $32 million to commercialize technology from the University of Washington. "It supplemented our R&D; costs and helped us position our company for the energy storage market."

    SSTI's third-annual awards follow a nationwide competition recognizing outstanding achievements in tech-based economic development (TBED) emphasizing impact, strategic value and replicability. Recipients were selected by a panel of accomplished former and current practitioners and were honored today during a ceremony at SSTI's 13th Annual Conference in Overland Park, Kansas, attended by top economic development professionals from across the nation. More information about the awards is available online at http://www.prnewswire.com.

    About SSTI
    The State Science and Technology Institute is a national nonprofit organization that leads, supports and strengthens efforts to improve state and regional economies through science, technology and innovation. www.ssti.org.

    About Washington Technology Center
    Washington Technology Center is a statewide economic development organization focused on technology and innovation. We spark ideas, form connections between people and resources, and foster job growth to position Washington state as a national technology leader. Washington Technology Center channels state, federal, and private resources to help companies develop and commercialize new products and technologies. Our 15,000-square-foot Microfabrication Laboratory provides companies and university researchers access to facilities and specialized equipment for micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) research and product/process development. The impact of Washington Technology Center's work has generated more than $630 million in additional investment for Washington companies and researchers. For more information how Washington Technology Center can help research and development projects succeed, visit www.watechcenter.org or call 206-685-1920.

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    Omeros stock IPO closes lower in first two days of trading

    Omeros Corporation, a Seattle-based biopharmaceutical company, saw its stock price close lower in its first two days of trading after the company's initial public offering (IPO) on October 8, 2009. The company had priced its offering of 6.82 million shares at $10 each, but saw shares close trading at $8.46 on October 9. The Seattle Times reported that "Omeros, the first Pacific Northwest-based company to go public in nearly two years, was also the first early-stage pharmaceutical company nationally to do so since 2007."

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Omeros, Worst Performing IPO of 2009, Casts Shadow Over Other Aspiring Biotechs
    Xconomy - Seattle - October 27, 2009
  • Omeros stock sinks in market debut
    The Seattle Times - Seattle - October 9, 2009
  • Omeros Prices IPO at $68.2 Million
    The New York Times - New York - October 8, 2009

    Related WTC links:

  • Omeros is a WTC client
  • Washington Technology Center Awards $485,261 in Research Funding
    Posted 1/14/2009
  • Omeros awarded $465,000 grant for Parkinson's research
    Posted 1/13/2009

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    3TIER cuts staff due to uncertainty in the renewable energy market

    Xconomy reports that 3TIER, a Seattle-based provider of renewable energy assessment and power forecasting services, has laid off 19 employees -- an estimated 22 percent of its workforce. A company spokesperson acknowledged the uncertainty in the market and said that the staff reduction will help 3TIER transition to a "scalable and efficient information services business model."

    Updated (10/28/2009): 3TIER has launched a suite of solar assessment products.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • 3TIER Launches Next Generation of Solar Assessment
    Products
    3TIER press release - Seattle - October 14, 2009
  • 3Tier Group Cuts Staff To Deal With “Uncertainty” in Clean Energy ...
    Xconomy - Seattle - September 16, 2009

    Related WTC links:

  • 3TIER is a WTC client
  • 3TIER opens offices in Germany, Australia and India
    Posted 4/06/2009
  • Washington's clean tech companies -- a list from Xconomy
    Posted 3/03/2009
  • 3TIER launches global wind prospecting tool
    Posted 2/06/2009
  • 3TIER receives $10M in venture funding
    Posted 12/18/2008

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    IsoRay announces first head and neck cancer treated with Cesium-131

    IsoRay, Inc., a Richland-based developer of therapies for prostate and other cancers, has announced the first head and neck cancer treated with Cesium-131. Dwight Babcock, IsoRay's CEO, stated "This is an important development in our strategy to significantly broaden our base beyond prostate cancer. Cesium-131 has unique characteristics for treating many additional cancers such as this new application that provided a minimally invasive treatment option for this patient."

    Update 8/19/09: IsoRay received FDA clearance to market Cesium-131 for treating other cancers -- such as those affecting the head, neck and other organs -- beyond the current prostate market.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • IsoRay Announces First Head And Neck Cancer Treated With Cesium-131
    IsoRay - Richland, Wash. - July 27, 2009
  • IsoRay Announces FDA Clearance Supporting Enhanced Loading and Delivery Methods for the Treatment of Lung, Head and Neck, and Other Tumors
    IsoRay - Richland, Wash. - August 18, 2009

    Related WTC links:

  • IsoRay is a WTC client
  • IsoRay receives approval to market cancer therapy in Canada
    Posted 5/12/2009
  • IsoRay signs distribution agreement for prostate brachytherapy product
    Posted 2/19/2009

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    Washington Technology Center awards $376,454 to spur innovation and jobs

    Five company-researcher projects have been awarded state funding for the development of innovative commercial technologies.

    SEATTLE – July 1, 2009 – Washington Technology Center has awarded a total of $376,454 in state funding to five researchers working with companies to develop commercially promising technologies. The companies expect commercial adoption of their technologies to create 175 new jobs in Washington during the next five years.

    The company partners are: Data Data, of Vancouver; Healionics, of Redmond; Modumetal, of Seattle; Paine Electronics, of East Wenatchee; and Simulab, of Seattle. Winning proposals from the University of Washington and Washington State University Vancouver described innovation in computer systems and microelectronics, advanced materials and manufacturing, and biotechnology and biomedical devices.

    "I commend these companies and their research partners for growing new business opportunities," said Washington Governor Chris Gregoire in support of this round of award winners. "This kind of investment in innovation builds on our state’s strong university research institutions, supports our 21st century industries, and most importantly, helps to create family-wage jobs in Washington.”

    This round of projects addresses a wide range of innovation:

    Data Data, Inc., a property data solutions company founded in 2007, is collaborating with the School of Engineering and Computer Science at Washington State University Vancouver to evaluate the use of machine learning algorithms to improve document classification and information extraction from images of public records documents. Data Data expects that successful application of this technology will enable the company to scale its real estate market statistics services to the national level and, in the process, create 40 new technology jobs in Washington during the next five years. WSU Vancouver will receive $28,546 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $5,845 from Data Data for the project. More

    Healionics Corporation, a startup biomaterials company in Redmond, is partnered with the Department of Medicine at the University of Washington to commercialize UW technology that will reduce infection from skin-breaching devices such as catheters. Healionics expects this technology will enable the company to capture a significant part of a $100-200 million market resulting in the creation of 50 new technology jobs during the next five years. UW will receive $82,500 in Phase II research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $16,500 from Healionics for the project. More

    Modumetal, Inc., a Seattle-based developer of nanostructured materials, is teamed with the University of Washington’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering to develop an innovative nanostructured anti-corrosion technology. Modumetal projects this new technology will lead to many opportunities in a $120 billion market and grow 50 jobs in the company during the next five years. UW will receive $100,000 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $20,000 from Modumetal for the project. More

    Paine Electronics, LLC, a manufacturer of pressure instrumentation with headquarters in East Wenatchee and a production facility in Renton, is collaborating with the University of Washington’s Department of Electrical Engineering to develop an integrated circuit for use in high-temperature sensors. Paine Electronics expects the new sensors will open up opportunities in the growing geothermal and mineral exploration markets, and create 25 jobs during the next five years. UW will receive $65,408 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $14,538 from Paine Electronics for the project. More

    Simulab Corporation, a Seattle-based developer of medical and surgical simulators, is working with the BioRobotics Laboratory at the University of Washington to commercialize UW software capable of measuring hands-on surgical skills. Simulab plans to target surgical residency programs and large hospitals for the skill-evaluating simulators, and projects the creation of 20 jobs during the next five years. UW will receive $100,000 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $20,000 from Simulab for the project. More

    About the Research & Technology Development (RTD) Grant Program
    Washington Technology Center competitively awards around $1 million in state funding annually through the Research & Technology Development Grant Program for technology projects that show strong potential for commercializing products and creating jobs in Washington. Each project team is comprised of a Washington company partner and a researcher from a university or research nonprofit in the state. The company defines the research challenge and provides access to the commercial market. The university or nonprofit researcher executes the research with funding from both Washington Technology Center and the company partner. Since 1996, the RTD program has supported 335 research commercialization projects. Applications for the next funding round are due October 22, 2009. More information about the research and technology development program is available online at http://www.watechcenter.org/rtd.

    About Washington Technology Center
    Washington Technology Center is a statewide economic development organization focused on technology and innovation. We spark ideas, form connections between people and resources, and foster job growth to position Washington state as a national technology leader. As an organization, Washington Technology Center channels state, federal, and private resources to help companies develop and commercialize new products and technologies. Our 15,000-square-foot Microfabrication Laboratory provides companies and university researchers access to facilities and specialized equipment for micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) research and product/process development. The impact of Washington Technology Center’s work has generated more than $600 million in additional investment for Washington companies and researchers. For more information how Washington Technology Center can help research and development projects succeed, visit www.watechcenter.org or call 206-685-1920.

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    Impulse Accelerated Technologies announces successful medical imaging project with University of Washington

    Impulse Accelerated Technologies, Inc., a Kirkland-based developer of software-to-hardware tools, announced the successful completion of a tomographic image reconstruction acceleration project at the University of Washington.

    According to a press release issued by the company, UW researchers "achieved 38 ms back-projection of a 512 x 512-pixel image from 512 projections. This represented a greater than 100X speedup over a software-only benchmark algorithm. This project, which was funded in part by a $100,000 Research and Technology Development grant from Washington Technology Center, was intended to determine the benefits and tradeoffs of using higher-level FPGA programming methods for medical imaging, radar and other applications requiring high throughput image reconstruction."

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Researchers accelerate tomographic image reconstruction with FPGA programming
    Vision Systems Design - Nashua,NH - June 22, 2009

    Related WTC links:

  • Impulse Accelerated Technologies is a WTC client

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    Modumetal, UW Partnership Receives Funding for Anti-Corrosion Technology

    Modumetal to develop an innovative commercial anti-corrosion technology in partnership with University of Washington's Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

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    SEATTLE – May 20, 2009 – Washington Technology Center (WTC) has awarded an Entrepreneur's Access grant to the University of Washington to support an advanced material research collaboration with Modumetal, Inc. of Seattle, Washington.

    Modumetal, Inc., a Seattle-based developer of nanostructured materials, is collaborating with the University of Washington's Department of Materials Science and Engineering on a project titled "Functionally-Graded Preceramic Polymer Coating for Corrosion Resistant Commercial Sulfuric Acid Pipelines."

    "We are excited about this opportunity to partner with the exceptional researchers at the University of Washington to create this cutting-edge material for new commercial anti-corrosion application," says Leslie Warren, Modumetal's Project Manager and senior engineer in this effort. Christina Lomasney, the company's CEO confirms that "with support from partners like the WTC and University of Washington, Modumetal is poised to create a new technology that will have broad industrial application and will result in new jobs and economic growth in our region."

    Sulfuric acid is a highly corrosive substance used extensively in industrial processes. Typical anti-corrosion coatings have a weakness – if breached, they leave the metal surface underneath the coating vulnerable to acid attack. Modumetal has a unique production method that eliminates this surface weakness by allowing anti-corrosion materials to be functionally combined with metal.

    With this project, the team of Modumetal and UW Professor Rajendra Bordia, Ph.D., plans to modify a preceramic polymer system developed at the University to merge with a functionally graded materials system developed by Modumetal for corrosion protection of commercial sulfuric acid production pipelines for ConocoPhillips.

    "This project combines the research that has been done at the University of Washington and at Modumetal to develop a novel solution for a significant problem in the area of corrosion," said Dr. Bordia. "The short term EA funding from WTC gives us a chance to initiate this joint development and prepares us for long term collaboration with Modumetal. The need for corrosion resistant coatings is widespread and the proposed solution that we will be exploring with Modumetal has the potential to impact a broad range of industries."

    Modumetal expects that successful application of this technology will lead to many opportunities in the $300 million corrosion-prevention market.

    The $5,000 award for this project comes from an Entrepreneur's Access grant from Washington Technology Center (WTC). WTC competitively awards around $1 million in state funding annually for research and technology development projects. State funding enables collaboration between companies and non-profit research institutions on technology projects that show strong potential for commercializing products and creating jobs. Since 1996, the state has funded 330 research and technology development projects.

    "This grant is a great example of state government at its best," said Washington State Representative Jamie Pedersen (D-Seattle). "The seed money from WTC, combined with world-class research facilities at the University of Washington and the innovative entrepreneurs at Modumetal, will create jobs and help the state maintain its lead in technology."

    More information about the research and technology development program is available online at http://www.watechcenter.org/rtd.

    About Modumetal, Inc.
    Modumetal (www.modumetal.com) was co-founded in 2006 in Seattle, WA to realize the commercial potential of a unique class of advanced materials. Modumetal is creating revolutionary nanolaminated and functionally-graded materials that will change design and manufacturing forever by dramatically improving the structural, corrosion and high temperature performance of coatings, bulk materials and parts. Modumetal represents a whole new way of producing parts and is leveraging nanotechnology to achieve this unprecedented performance. Modumetal is made by a "green" electrochemical manufacturing approach, which reduces the carbon footprint of conventional metals manufacturing at the same time that it redefines materials performance.

    About Washington Technology Center
    Washington Technology Center is a statewide economic development organization focused on technology and innovation. We spark ideas, form connections between people and resources, and foster job growth to position Washington state as a national technology leader. As an organization, Washington Technology Center channels state, federal, and private resources to help companies develop and commercialize new products and technologies. Our 15,000-square-foot Microfabrication Laboratory provides companies and university researchers access to facilities and specialized equipment for micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) research and product/process development. The impact of Washington Technology Center's work has generated more than $600 million in additional investment for Washington companies and researchers. For more information how Washington Technology Center can help research and development projects succeed, visit www.watechcenter.org or call 206-685-1920.

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    Related WTC links:

  • Modumetal is a WTC client

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    VentriPoint raises $1 million in debenture financing

    VentriPoint Diagnostics Ltd., a Seattle-based provider of diagnostic tools to monitor patients with heart disease, announced it raised total proceeds of $1,052,317 in debenture financing. Health Canada has granted licensed approval for VentriPoint's diagnostic tool which is based upon technology received by VentriPoint through its exclusive technology license with the University of Washington. The diagnostic tool, together with its associated online service, is being developed for a variety of heart related diseases, including congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more in the VentriPoint press release

    Related WTC links:

  • VentriPoint is a WTC client

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    WTC research funding applications due April 23

    Are you working on innovative technology applications with near-term commercial potential? Consider applying for a Washington Technology Center grant to offset the costs of your R&D.; Applications are due April 23.

    www.watechcenter.org/rtd

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    Washington Technology Center awards hundreds of thousands of dollars in funding to Washington-based research teams in an effort to help transition great ideas out of the laboratory and into the marketplace.

    If you are a Washington technology business looking to partner with an academic or non-profit researcher on a collaborative research endeavor, you may be eligible for a funding award through Washington Technology Center's Research & Technology Development (RTD) grants program.

    These awards help Washington companies grow faster, create jobs and attract investors by providing the critical funding needed to advance scientific research and product development.

    RTD awards pay up to 80% of the cost of research projects -- allowing you to channel your capital to other business growth needs or continue working on breakthrough scientific discoveries. Project teams are eligible to receive up to $100,000 for initial proof-of-concept projects and up to $300,000 total for multi-phase projects.

    Washington Technology Center allocates $1 million annually for these grants, which are awarded on a competitive basis to collaborative research teams working on innovative technology projects with strong commercial potential.

    Washington Technology Center is now accepting proposals for its next round of grants which will be awarded in June. Projects begin July 1. But hurry, applications are due April 23.

    Free informational meetings are held throughout Washington state each year.

    For more information about the RTD Grants Program, visit http://www.watechcenter.org/rtd. Here you will find everything from Eligibility Criteria to Downloadable Proposal Materials. Or, for additional information, please contact Russell Paez, 206.616.3102, rpaez@watechcenter.org.

    More than 300 companies have benefited from the RTD grant program. You could be next.

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    3TIER opens offices in Germany, Australia and India

    3TIER, a Seattle-based provider of renewable energy assessment and power forecasting services, announced the expansion of its global operations with new offices in Germany, Australia and India. "These offices provide a 'local' presence for financiers, developers, operators or governments who need 3TIER's expertise in wind, solar and hydro assessment and forecasting," said Pascal Storck, Ph.D, president of global operations at 3TIER. Storck says the offices will help them develop partnerships in the rapidly growing markets of Europe, the Pacific Rim and India.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more in the 3TIER press release [PDF]

    Related WTC links:

  • 3TIER is a WTC client
  • 3TIER launches global wind prospecting tool
  • 3TIER receives $10M in venture funding

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    Healionics ships its first product, glaucoma treatment for dogs

    Healionics Corporation, a start-up biomaterials company in Redmond, announced the sale and shipment of the first commercial product featuring Healionics' STAR® biomaterial. A company press release says the product, TR-ClarifEYE™, an innovative veterinary glaucoma implant marketed by TR BioSurgical, LLC (TRBIO), is scheduled for limited market launch in April 2009. "We are very excited to announce the first commercial shipment of STAR, which is a significant milestone for Healionics and represents the Company’s first revenue from product sales," said Healionics CEO Michel Alvarez. In related news, Alvarez replaces Rob Brown as CEO in a management change.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more in the Healionics press release
  • Read more in Xconomy

    Related WTC links:

  • Healionics is a WTC client
  • Healionics raises $2.6 million
  • Healionics announces first commercial product for biomaterial

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    VisionGate sells first commercially available Cell-CT™ imaging platform

    VisionGate, a Gig Harbor headquartered company working in the field of cancer diagnostics, has sold its first commercially available Cell-CT™ imaging platform to Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute. VisionGate's patented technology was developed with assistance from UW researcher Eric Seibel.

    In a February 26th press release from ASU, Thomas Neumann, M.D., VisionGate’s vice president for medical science, said the sale of the company’s first Cell-CT platform is a significant step for the company. “We are encouraged that the scientists at the Biodesign Institute will be using our novel 3-D cellular imaging technology for their groundbreaking research on single cell biology,” he said. “VisionGate plans to continue developing the Cell-CT system for clinical use in the early detection of lung cancer, and the agreement announced today is expected to provide valuable contributions to the institute’s personalized medicine initiatives.”

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more in the Arizona State University press release

    Related WTC links:

  • VisionGate is a WTC client
  • VisionGate and University of Washington create 3-D cancer imaging

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    IsoRay signs distribution agreement for prostate brachytherapy product

    IsoRay, a Richland-based producer of the Cesium-131 brachytherapy seed used to treat prostate and other cancers, announced it has signed an agreement with BrachySciences, a division of Biocompatibles International plc, to distribute IsoRay's Proxcelan Cesium-131 brachytherapy seeds.

    In a press release, Dwight Babcock, chairman and CEO of IsoRay, stated, "We are very pleased to announce this collaboration with BrachySciences. Management believes this distribution agreement will enable us to increase the sales of Cesium-131 within the prostate cancer therapy market. This supports our ongoing strategy of driving sales by adding an additional outside distribution channel to augment our current sales staff. We look forward to a close working relationship with BrachySciences that will help us further penetrate the brachytherapy market."

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more in the IsoRay press release

    Related WTC links:

  • IsoRay is a WTC client

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    VisionGate and University of Washington create 3-D cancer imaging

    VisionGate, Inc., a privately-held company in Gig Harbor, Wash., and University of Washington researchers led by Eric Seibel, a UW mechanical engineering associate professor, have helped develop a new kind of microscope to visualize cells in three dimensions, technology that could help advance early cancer detection. According to a University of Washington press release, the machine works by rotating the cell under the microscope lens and taking hundreds of pictures per rotation, and then digitally combining them to form a single 3-D image. Funding was provided by VisionGate and Washington Technology Center.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more in UWNews.org

    Related WTC links:

  • VisionGate is a WTC client

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    3TIER launches global wind prospecting tool

    3TIER, a Seattle-based provider of wind, solar and hydro energy assessment forecasting, announced expansion of its FirstLook® Prospecting tool, providing free access to average wind speed ranges throughout the world. “This intuitive and interactive tool provides a free, initial assessment of global wind resources,” says Kenneth Westrick, CEO and founder of 3TIER. “We developed this map as part of REmapping the World,™ a sophisticated renewable energy resource mapping initiative we launched in March 2008 to address the biggest barrier to global renewable energy adoption – the lack of information.”

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read the 3TIER press release
  • Navigate the map at http://firstlook.3tier.com
  • Learn more about wind forecasting and 3TIER at The Wall Street Journal

    Related WTC links:

  • 3TIER is a WTC client
  • 3TIER receives $10M in venture funding

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    nLIGHT adds $10.7 million in growth capital

    nLIGHT Corporation (nLIGHT), the emerging leader of high-power semiconductor lasers, announced that it has received $10.7 million in the first closing of a new equity financing. nLIGHT will use the new growth capital to drive continued product development of integrated laser modules and increase sales in its core industrial, defense, and medical markets. Continued investment came from existing venture investors Oak Investment Partners, Mohr Davidow Ventures and Menlo Ventures.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read the nLIGHT press release

    Related WTC links:

  • nLIGHT is a WTC client

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    Microvision demonstrates a preproduction pico projector at Macworld and CES

    Microvision's plug-and-play projector creates a large screen image from a miniature device that connects to the TV-out or VGA connector on portable devices such as mobile phones, portable media players and notebook computers.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • More at Broadcast Engineering
  • More at Microvision

    Related WTC links:

  • Microvision is a WTC client

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    Ultreo closes operation

    Ultreo, maker of an ultrasound toothbrush, posted a statement on its Web site announcing it ceased operations on December 22, 2008. Company CEO & President Glenn Bonagura cited insufficient cash flow and a lack of potential investors or purchasers as reasons for closing.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read the statement on the Ultreo Web site.

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    Theo Chocolate, UW scientists to identify the best organic cocoa beans

    Xconomy's interview with Theo's chief operating officer and food scientist, Dr. Andy McShea, describes Theo's partnership with University of Washington to develop food quality-analysis technology.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • More in Xconomy

    Related WTC links:

  • Theo Chocolate is a WTC client

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    Washington Technology Center Awards $485,261 in Research Funding

    Washington Technology Center awarded research and technology development funding totaling $485,261 to seven* projects developed between companies and Washington researchers.

    Companies with winning projects for January 2009 are: Applied Precision, of Issaquah; ATS, of Silverdale; The Boeing Company and HEATCON® Composite Systems, of Seattle; Enertechnix, of Maple Valley; GeoMonkey, Inc., of Vancouver; Omeros Corporation, of Seattle; and Theo Chocolate, Inc., of Seattle. Winning proposals described innovative research in computer systems and microelectronics, advanced materials and manufacturing, food safety and quality, and biotechnology and biomedical devices.

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    "Washington’s success in research and development is known globally," said Washington Governor Chris Gregoire in support of this round of award winners. "And the bold innovations created by these companies will help keep Washington’s economy robust. Congratulations to each of you."

    Washington Technology Center competitively awards around $1 million in state funding annually as part of the Research and Technology Development Grant Program. State funding enables collaboration between companies and non-profit research institutions on technology projects that show strong potential for commercializing products and creating jobs. Since 1996, the state has funded 329 Research and Technology Development projects.

    Each project team is comprised of a Washington company partner and a researcher from a university or research nonprofit in the state. The company defines the research challenge and provides access to the commercial market. The university or nonprofit researcher executes the research with funding from both Washington Technology Center and the company partner.

    This round of projects addresses a wide range of innovation:

    Applied Precision, Inc., an Issaquah-based manufacturer of biomedical imaging systems, is collaborating with the University of Washington’s School of Medicine to commercialize a microfluidic imaging technology for biomedical applications. UW will receive $95,215 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $22,500 from Applied Precision for the project. More

    ATS, a Silverdale-based provider of intelligent search software and services, is working with Washington State University’s School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science to develop data merging algorithms. WSU will receive $50,000 in Phase II research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $17,500 from ATS for the project. More

    The Boeing Company’s Research & Technology group and HEATCON® Composite Systems, a Seattle-based composite repair equipment supplier, are collaborating with the University of Washington’s Mechanical Engineering Department to improve the efficiency of composite-structural repairs. UW will receive $75,190 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $20,000 from The Boeing Company for the project. More

    Enertechnix, a Maple Valley-based manufacturer of high-temperature imaging systems, is collaborating with the University of Washington’s Department of Electrical Engineering to develop algorithms to control the cleaning of heat-transfer surfaces in industrial processes. UW will receive $100,000 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $20,000 from Enertechnix for the project. More

    GeoMonkey (doing business as MapWith.Us), a Vancouver-based developer of mapping software, is collaborating with WSU Vancouver’s School of Engineering and Computer Science to develop a framework for publishing geo-spatial data generated from consumer mobile communication devices. WSU Vancouver will receive $35,582 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $8,092 from GeoMonkey for the project. More

    Omeros Corporation, a Seattle-based biopharmaceutical company, is working with the University of Washington’s Department of Bioengineering to develop a new drug delivery platform for applications in medical imaging and cancer therapy. UW will receive $99,274 in Phase II research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $34,746 from Omeros Corporation for the project. More

    Theo Chocolate, Inc., a Seattle-based manufacturer of artisan chocolates and confections, is collaborating with the University of Washington’s Department of Chemistry to develop food-safety and quality-analysis technology. UW will receive $30,000 in Phase I research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $6,000 from Theo Chocolate for the project. More

    This round of funding is anticipated to generate more than 350 full-time technology jobs in Washington during the next five years. Washington Technology Center estimates that through its work with entrepreneurs, more than 7,000 new technology jobs have been created in Washington state, many of these from award recipients. New project funding is awarded twice annually.

    Annual follow-up surveys show that the Research and Technology Development Grant Program has helped Washington companies transition novel technologies into commercially-viable ventures.

    Proposals for the next round of funding are due April 23, 2009. More information about the Research and Technology Development Grant Program is available online at http://www.watechcenter.org/rtd.

    * (Update 2/10/09: an eighth project -- Greenwood Technologies -- has been canceled)

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    Omeros awarded $465,000 grant for Parkinson's research

    Omeros Corporation, a Seattle-based biopharmaceutical company, has been awarded a $465,000 grant from The Michael J. Fox Foundation to evaluate Omeros' recent dicovery of a new target for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

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    Northstar Neuroscience announces plans to dissolve

    Northstar Neuroscience, a medical device company developing therapies for the treatment of major depressive disorder, announced in a press release January 5, 2009 "that its Board of Directors has determined, in its best business judgment after consideration of potential strategic alternatives, that it is in the best interests of the company and its shareholders to liquidate the company's assets and to dissolve the company."

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    3TIER receives $10M in venture funding

    The venture funding will help Seattle-based 3TIER open offices in Europe and Asia and expand globally its forecasting and assessment products and services for weather-driven renewable energy resources (wind, hydro and solar power).

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    Insilicos Awarded $900K Grant From NIH

    Insilicos announced that the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (part of the National Institutes of Health) has awarded the company a $900,000 grant to study Ensemble Learning. Ensemble Learning is a prediction technique that is particularly well-suited to the large data sets of biomedical research. Insilicos has received over $3 million in NIH grants, which support the company's research towards diagnostics for cardiovascular disease.

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    Healionics raises $2.6 million

    Healionics Corporation, a start-up biomaterials company in Redmond, has raised $2.6 million in a second round of financing. Investors came from several angel funding networks -- the Bellingham Angels, the Alliance of Angels, Keiretsu, the Tacoma Angel Network and the Zino Society. The company is commercializing UW technology that will reduce infection from skin-breaching devices such as catheters.

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    Neah Power awarded $1.2M Navy grant, also buys SolCool One

    Neah Power Systems, a Bothell-based maker of fuel cells and power systems for portable electronic devices, announced it completed its first Office of Naval Research contract and received a second contract worth $1.2 million to aid in funding the development of Neah Power's unique methanol-based fuel cell. The company also announced its purchase of SolCool One, a leader in the solar air conditioning industry, with an established manufacturing partner in China.

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    EnerG2 raises $8.5 M in financing round

    EnerG2, a Seattle-based startup in the energy storage market, announced the company has raised $8.5 million in a Series A financing round led by OVP Venture Partners of Kirkland and Firelake Capital Management of Palo Alto, California. EnerG2 uses University of Washington technology to create ultracapacitors which store and release more energy faster than conventional batteries.

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    Research funding proposals due Oct. 23, 2008; next round of proposals due April 23, 2009

    WTC competitively awards around $1 million annually to applied research projects that show strong potential for generating long-term economic impact in Washington state.

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    Scientists develop new cancer-killing compound from salad plant

    Researchers at the University of Washington have updated a traditional Chinese medicine to create a compound that is more than 1,200 times more specific in killing certain kinds of cancer cells than currently available drugs, heralding the possibility of a more effective chemotherapy drug with minimal side effects. The compound is currently being licensed to Artemisia Biomedical Inc. for commercialization.

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  • Healionics announces first commercial product for biomaterial

    Healionics, a start-up company in Redmond, has entered into a multi-million dollar manufacturing, supply and distribution agreement for use of its biomaterial in a veterinary glaucoma implant made by TR BioSurgical. Healionics was founded on technology developed by Dr. Buddy Ratner and Dr. Andrew Marshall at the University of Washington Engineered Biomaterials center and licensed from UW.

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    UW licenses 'camera in a pill' technology

    In one of its largest technology transfer deals, University of Washington has licensed imaging technology to medical-device maker Hoya, which plans to commercialize the technology in the next couple of years. Research funding for the technology came from several sources including Washington Technology Center.

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  • Aculight Corp. acquired by Lockheed Martin

    Aculight, a Bothell-based developer of laser technologies for national defense and aerospace applications, has been acquired by Lockheed Martin. Aculight's 90 employees will remain in Bothell and will become part of Lockheed Martin's Maritime Systems & Sensors business.

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  • Insitu acquired by Boeing

    Insitu, a maker of unmanned aerial systems in Bingen, Washington for military and commercial customers, has been acquired by Boeing. Insitu will continue to operate independently as a separate subsidiary under Boeing Integrated Defense Systems' Military Aircraft unit.

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  • Insitu is a WTC client

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  • Washington Technology Center awards $512,269 in research funding

    Seven company-researcher projects have been awarded state funding for the development of innovative commercial technology applications.

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  • Proposals for research and technology development funding due Oct. 23, 2008

    WTC competitively awards around $1 million annually to applied research projects that show strong potential for generating long-term economic impact in Washington state.

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  • Efficere, WSU Vancouver improving signal transfer in electronics

    Their partnership is profiled in an article by the Vancouver Business Journal. The team aims to streamline the electronics design process.

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  • Research funding proposals due April 24, 2008

    Washington Technology Center competitively awards around $1 million annually to applied research projects that show strong potential for generating long-term economic impact in Washington state.

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  • InnovaTek Collaboration Receives Research Funding for Hydrogen Fuel Technology

    Washington Technology Center awarded $64,275 in Research and Technology Development funding based on a proposal from InnovaTek in collaboration with Washington State University.

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  • Washington Technology Center awards $528,978 in research funding

    Eight company-researcher projects have been awarded state funding for the development of innovative commercial technology applications. Companies with winning projects for January 2008 are: ATS Intelligent Discovery, of Silverdale; Columbia PhytoTechnology, LLC, of Carson; Efficere Technologies, Inc., of Vancouver; Greenwood Technologies, of Bellevue; Infometrix, Inc., of Bothell; Insilicos, of Seattle; nLight Photonics, of Vancouver; and Omeros Corporation, of Seattle.

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  • Research funding proposals due Oct. 18, 2007. Next round of proposals due Apr. 24, 2008

    Washington Technology Center competitively awards around $1 million annually to applied research projects that show strong potential for generating long-term economic impact in Washington state.

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  • Washington Technology Center awards $499,938 in research funding

    Five companies are awarded state funding for innovative commercial technology applications developed in partnership with Washington researchers.

    Grant winners for July 2007 are Artemisia BioMedical, Inc., of Newcastle; dTEC Systems, LLC, of Seattle; Hummingbird Scientific, of Lacey; Kronos Air Technologies, of Redmond; and Magic Wheels, of Seattle. Winning proposals outlined breakthrough research in biotechnology, materials science, defense and security, and microelectronics.

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    "Washington's economy is driven by creativity and innovation," said Washington Governor Chris Gregoire in support of this year's award winners. "And these companies are at the forefront of our effort to build the next Washington. Congratulations to each of you."

    Washington Technology Center competitively awards around $1 million in state funding annually as part of the Research and Technology Development program. State funding enables collaboration between companies and non-profit research institutions on technology projects that show strong potential for commercializing products and creating jobs. Since 1996, the state has funded 309 Research and Technology Development projects.

    This round of funding is projected to generate more than 200 full-time technology jobs in Washington during the next five years. Washington Technology Center estimates that through its work with entrepreneurs, more than 7,000 new technology jobs have been created in Washington state, many of these from grant award recipients. New project funding is awarded twice annually.

    This round of projects addresses a wide range of innovation:

    Artemisia BioMedical, a privately-held biotechnology company based in Newcastle, Washington, has teamed with University of Washington researchers Tomikazu Sasaki, Narendra Singh and Henry Lai to develop improved therapeutic treatment options for cancer and other serious diseases. Research and Technology Development funding: $100,000.

    Seattle-based dTEC Systems, a developer of environmental monitoring systems, has teamed with University of Washington Chemical Engineering researcher Samson A. Jenekhe to develop a novel low-cost chemical sensor technology for on-site environmental applications. Research and Technology Development funding: $100,000.

    Hummingbird Scientific, a Lacey, Washington-based developer of microscopy solutions, has teamed with University of Washington electrical engineering researcher Karl Böhringer to develop an improved high temperature heating element for use in the transmission electron microscope – a development that will lead to scientific advancements across a range of scientific fields. Research and Technology Development funding: $100,000.

    Kronos Air Technologies, a Redmond-based developer of air movement and purification products, has teamed with University of Washington electrical engineering researcher Alexander V. Mamishev to develop a novel, energy-efficient electrostatic air pump that addresses the problem of thermal management in microelectronics. Research and Technology Development funding: $100,000.

    MagicWheels Inc., a Seattle-based maker of a patented, two-gear manual wheelchair wheel, has teamed with University of Washington materials science and engineering researcher Brian Flinn to provide mechanical, endurance and environmental testing for a cost-effective wheel manufacturing process that will benefit wheelchair users. Research and Technology Development funding: $99,938.

    Washington Technology Center’s Research and Technology Development grants have proved effective in helping Washington companies and researchers transition novel technologies from “good ideas” into commercially-viable ventures. Annual follow-up surveys show that assisted companies have been successful in leveraging these grants into more than $400 million in additional funding.

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  • Proposals for Research and Technology Development funding due Oct. 18, 2007

    WTC competitively awards around $1 million annually to applied research projects that show strong potential for generating long-term economic impact in Washington state.

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  • RTD grant info sessions - Aug. and Sept. 2007

    Free orientation sessions on early-stage R&D; funding will be held in Seattle, Spokane, Pullman, and online.

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  • Grant Proposals due April 26, 2007

    Washington Technology Center is currently accepting applications for its next round of Research and Technology Development (RTD) Awards. WTC awards more than $1.2 million annually to projects that partner Washington companies with academic and non-profit research teams.

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  • Seven Companies Receive State-Funded Research Grants

    Washington Technology Center awarded research and technology development grants totaling $457,301 to seven companies working in partnership with academic researchers from the University of Washington and Washington State University.

    Grant winners for January 2007 are Arcadia Biosciences, Seattle; Carbon Nanoprobes, Seattle; Northwind Marine, Seattle; FungusAmongUs, Snohomish; Greenwood Technologies, Bellevue; nLight Photonics, Vancouver; and VisionGate, Gig Harbor. Winning proposals outlined breakthrough research in biotechnology, defense and security, nanotechnology, energy and manufacturing.

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    "Research institutions in Washington are engines of economic growth and these grants bridge the gap between good research and competitive products," says Washington Governor Chris Gregoire. "Congratulations to these innovative companies and researchers."

    Washington state allocates more than $1.2 million annually to the Washington Technology Center grants program. State funding enables collaboration between companies and university researchers on technology projects that show strong potential for commercializing products and creating jobs. Since 1996, the state has funded 304 Research and Technology Development projects.

    This round of grants is expected to generate more than 300 full-time technology jobs in Washington over the next five years. Washington Technology Center estimates that through its work with entrepreneurs, over 7,000 new technology jobs have been created in Washington state, many of these from grant award recipients. New project funding is awarded twice annually.

    Companies are eligible for financial awards up to $100,000 per phase for initial proof-of-concept projects or multi-phase research.

    The Washington Technology Center’s research and technology development grants have proved effective in helping Washington companies and researchers transition novel technologies from “good ideas” into commercially-viable ventures. Annual follow-up surveys show that assisted companies have been successful in leveraging these grants into more than $400 million in additional funding.

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  • Research Funding Available

    Accepting applications for spring 2007 Research and Technology Development Awards.

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  • Eleven companies, researchers awarded grants

    "Live long and prosper" could be the tagline for this year's Research and Technology Development (RTD) grant winners. Disease prevention, greener living, and raising the bar on performance were popular themes among the most recent round of grants awarded by Washington Technology Center (WTC).

    RTD grant winners for July 2006 are 3TIER, Seattle; Cadwell Laboratories, Kennewick; Calypso Medical Technologies, Inc., Seattle; EnergG2, Seattle; Hummingbird Scientific, Lacey; Infometrix, Inc., Bothell; Insitu, Bingen; Kronos Air Technologies, Redmond; MicroGREEN Polymers, Arlington; SpringStar USA, Inc., Woodinville; and VentriPoint, Seattle.

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    WTC awarded $952,414 through its RTD program to 11 Washington companies teamed with state researchers from the University of Washington, Washington State University and Swedish Medical Center.

    Winning proposals outlined breakthrough discoveries in everything from heart disease to hydropower, psychoses to pest control, cancer prevention to chromatographs, robust energy storage to robotic reconnaissance aircraft.

    Thermal management was a "hot" issue this year as well with projects taking on such challenges as high temperature testing for nanotech applications, air handling systems for micro-electronics and heat-resistant food packaging made from eco-friendly materials.

    WTC allocates more than $1.2 million annually to the RTD grants program, which provides seed funding to entrepreneurial companies teamed with university researchers on technology projects that show strong commercial potential. Applicants are eligible for financial awards ranging from $100,000 for initial proof-of-concept projects to up to $300,000 for multi-phase research.

    The process is competitive and the goal is clear: to transition our state's most promising innovations into commercial products, company growth and high-wage jobs. The Washington Technology Center has supported 293 technology commercialization projects through its RTD program since 1995.

    These grants have proved effective in helping these companies transition novel technologies from "good ideas" into commercially-viable ventures. From this initial funding, these companies are better able to attract add-on funding from federal grants, angel investors, and industry partners. Annual follow-up surveys show that WTC–assisted companies have been successful in leveraging RTD grants into more than $400 million in additional funding.

    WTC estimates that through its work with Washington entrepreneurs, over 7,000 new technology jobs have been created in our state, many of these from RTD Award recipients. This round of grants is expected to generate roughly 250 full-time technology jobs in Washington over the next two to five years.

    July 2006
    RTD Grant Winners

    3Tier
    Seattle
    Research Partner:
    Andrew Wood, PhD, UW Civil & Environmental Engineering

    Cadwell Laboratories
    Kennewick
    Research Partner: James Wise, PhD, WSU-TriCities

    Calypso Medical Technologies (*project canceled)
    Seattle
    Research Partner:
    Timothy P. Mate, MD, Swedish Medical Center

    EnergG2
    Seattle
    Research Partner: Guozhong Cao, PhD, UW Materials Science & Engineering

    Hummingbird Scientific
    Lacey
    Research Partner:
    Karl Bohringer, PhD,
    UW Electrical Engineering

    Infometrix
    Bothell
    Research Partners: Jaromir Ruzicka, PhD, Mel Koch, PhD, UW Center for Process Analytical Chemistry

    Insitu
    Bingen
    Research Partner:
    Rolf Rysdyk, PhD, UW Aeronautics & Astronautics

    Kronos Air Technologies
    Redmond
    Research Partner:
    Alexander Mamishev, PhD, UW Electrical Engineering

    MicroGREEN Polymers
    Arlington
    Research Partner:
    Vipin Kumar, PhD, UW Mechanical Engineeering

    SpringStar USA, Inc.
    Woodinville
    Research Partner:
    R. Bruce Darling, PhD,
    UW Electrical Engineering

    VentriPoint
    Seattle
    Research Partner:
    Florence Sheehan, MD,
    UW Medical Center

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  • 12 Companies Receive Research Grants from Washington Technology Center

    Sounder sleep. Healthier teeth and gums. More effective medication. Lush lawns and gardens. Tastier breakfast cereal. More powerful electronics. Stealthier military operations. These are some of the innovative ideas born from Washington researchers and business entrepreneurs that will get a jump start to market thanks to public investment from Washington Technology Center (WTC).

    WTC's Research & Technology Development (RTD) grants program awards more than $1 million annually to university researchers teamed with technology companies on projects that show potential for commercial success.

    Twelve Washington companies received awards totaling more than $657,000 in the most recent round of funding. These recipients represent businesses all across Washington, east to west and north to south, with research support provided by three of the state's major academic institutions: University of Washington, Washington State University and Central Washington University. This round of projects also strikes a nice balance of technology businesses operating in both urban and rural communities.

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    The financing assistance provided by these awards is designed to help companies looking to develop innovative new products to get the support necessary to conduct critical research and development studies. The ultimate goal is to provide these companies with a competitive commercial edge, accelerate the delivery of new technologies to market and create healthy business and higher wage jobs in Washington. The outcome of the research in these 12 projects is estimated to generate 650 new technology jobs in Washington over the next five years.

    Below is a list of the 12 RTD grant recipients. To read about each company and their research, click on the company names.

    Phase One Award Winners
    American Premix Technologies, Creston, Wash.
    CellVitro Technologies, Inc., Seattle, Wash.
    DiMeMa, Inc., Seattle, Wash.
    Kronos Air Technologies, Inc., Redmond, Wash.
    Pro-Tech Services, Inc., Mukilteo, Wash.
    SoilSoup, Inc., Seattle, Wash.

    Phase Two Award Winners
    Andgar Corporation, Ferndale, Wash.
    B&G; Farms, Royal City, Wash.
    Insitu Group, Bingen, Wash.
    MicroGREEN Polymers, Inc., Stanwood, Wash.
    Second Act Partners, Inc., Redmond, Wash.
    Tree Top, Inc., Selah, Wash.

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  • Twelve Washington companies receive research funding

    From contamination detection to cancer treatment, cattle waste to computer languages, twelve Washington companies got the green light to conduct critical research as a result of funding awards from Washington Technology Center. WTC's Research & Technology Development (RTD) Grant Program awards more than $1 million annually to university researchers working with emerging technology companies on projects that show potential for commercial success.

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    Proposals are evaluated on the basis of technical merit, economic impact and commercial viability. The financing assistance is designed to help the companies advance specific R&D; efforts that will enable them to enter or advance in the commercial marketplace and ultimately generate new technology jobs in Washington. The outcome of the research in these 12 projects is estimated to generate 600 new jobs in Washington over the next five years. RTD grants are awarded twice annually, in Fall and Spring.

    The 12 RTD award recipients represent businesses across Washington extending from Seattle, North Bend and Snoqualmie to Wenatchee, Colville, Spokane and Tri-Cities. Companies teamed with researchers from two of the state's major academic institutions: six are working with researchers from Washington State University (WSU) and six are collaborating with University of Washington (UW) researchers.

    Congratulations to WTC's 2004 Spring RTD award recipients:

    Cray, Inc., Seattle, WA
    Researcher: Dr. Lawrence Snyder, UW Computer Science and Engineering Department. This project will compare UW's supercomputer language ZPL to Cray's supercomputer language Chapel with the goal of creating one parallel language that builds off the strongest assets of each program. This new collaborative new language will be tested on Cray's next generation supercomputers. Both software programs are open source and will be used to accelerate the adoption and sale of supercomputers.

    Enerdyne Solutions, North Bend, WA
    Researchers: Dr. George LaRue, Dr. Mohamed Osman, WSU Electrical Engineering Department. This project will focus on developing a Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) Radio Frequency (RF) amplifier for use in wireless communications and radar applications that has two-to-three-times higher thermal performance over existing designs. This has the potential to increase power and reliability without compromising battery life or adding to the cost, size or weight of the device.

    Galaxy Compound Semiconductor, Spokane, WA
    Researcher: Dr. Matthew McCluskey, WSU Department of Physics Research will focus on characterizing a new infrared detector material that will have a wider spectral range than conventional detectors. An indium antimonide (InSb) based material that operates in the far infrared region would be a strong competitor to mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) semi-conductors in this market. To achieve this, Galaxy proposes adding Bismuth (Bi) to the alloy to extend the wavelength. Prototypes of the new detector will be tested, opening up new markets for Galaxy and increasing interest in InSbBi semiconductor materials.

    Impulse Accelerated Technologies, Seattle, WA
    Researcher: Dr. Carl Ebeling, UW Department of Computer Science & Engineering. This project will focus on developing key applications and creating additional hardware and software interfaces for a new set of design toolsspecifically compilers, optimizers, and debuggers that allow software applications expressed in high-level languages to be compiled to Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). The commercial availability of these tools will benefit applications used in imaging, biomedical research, data communication, geophysics, data encryption, and signal processing.

    IsoRay, Richland, WA
    Researcher: Dr. Leroy Korb, UW Radiation Oncology Department. This project will document the anticipated clinical and economic benefits of the company's new brachytherapy seed isotope, the Cs131seed, for the treatment of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men and IsoRay has the only FDA approved Cesium-131 brachytherapy seed that conforms to the AAPM Task Force 43 guidelines for clinical use. The results of the research will allow the company to gain a stronger foothold in the worldwide brachytherapy seed treatment market.

    Lygan Technologies, Seattle, WA
    Researcher: Dr. Guozhong Cao, UW Department of Materials Science & Engineering Research. This project will focus on developing and evaluating carbon-based nanostructures for use in industrial gas storage systems. These systems have the near-term potential to improve the safety, usability and cost-effectiveness of storing such gases as nitrogen and methane. A longer term goal would be to apply this technology to hydrogen, a desirable power source currently limited in use due to inability to effectively store this gas.

    Magic Wheels, Inc., Seattle, WA
    Researcher: Dr. Brian Flinn, UW Material Science & Engineering Department. This Phase II RTD project will continue testing the endurance, reliability and environmental resistance of Magic Wheels Inc.'s new two-speed manual wheelchair wheels. This two-speed drive contains composite wheels and provides multiple benefits to the manual wheelchair user including easier navigation on uneven terrain and possible reduction of arm pain.

    MicroConnex, Snoqualmie, WA
    Researcher: Dr. Scott Dunham, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering.
    The research team will test the feasibility of a new process for manufacturing large arrays of high performance thin film transistors on flexible substrates. This new process has the potential to advance the production of thin, flexible semiconductor devices for use in high performance, high frequency applications such as radar, telecommunications and signal processing.

    Multiform Harvest, Inc, Seattle, WA
    Researcher: Dr. Joseph Harrison, Department of Animal Sciences, WSU Puyallup. The effectiveness of a fluidized-bed crystallizer to remove phosphorus from dairy waste to prevent environmental degradation of surface water will be trialed at a dairy farm in Snohomish, WA. Dairy production is one of the top-ranked agricultural industries in Washington. An estimated one-third of all dairy farms in Washington use flush/irrigation systems to create liquid fertilizer from the cattle waste. EPA regulations are calling for a reduction in build up of phosphorus in soil. Solutions currently available are costly and cumbersome for dairy farmers to implement.

    Paine Electronics, Seattle and Wenatchee, WA
    Researcher: Dr. David Bahr, WSU School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. Research efforts will produce two prototype strain sensors for Paine's pressure gauges that will increase the products' sensitivity while maintaining the robust mechanical reliability of the devices. Paine's pressure transducers and pressure transmitters are used in aerospace, defense, oil and gas, marine and other industries.

    Vaagen Brothers Lumber, Inc., Colville, WA
    Researcher: Dr. Vikram Yadama and Dr. Karl Englund, WSU Wood Materials & Engineering Lab. The project will focus on the analysis and characterization of sawmill residue as a potential fiber source for the manufacturing of wood plastic composites, the potential of which could add value to mill waste that is economically and environmentally sound.

    Vista Engineering Technologies, Kennewick, WA
    Researcher: Dr. Kelvin Lynn, WSU Center for Materials Research. Research will center around the development of a non-invasive gaseous tracers for use with Vista's patented Pipeline Characterization Using Tracers (PCUT) method for detecting, locating and quantifying contamination within pipelines and ductwork. PCUT technology is advantageous and preferred over conventional inspection techniques as it can be used on any pipe diameter or configuration, has no moving parts, requires no equipment decontamination, and inspects all the interior pipeline surfaces. The PCUT technique has already been proven with other contaminants such as petroleum products and solvents. The current work with WSU will extend the use of the technology to pipelines and ductwork with heavy metal contamination such as mercury.

    Related WTC links:

  • Research and Technology Development Grant Program

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  • Research and Technology Development Award eligibility extends to nonprofit research institutions

    Companies looking to participate in WTC's research grant program can now explore research partnerships beyond the state's academic institutions. Nonprofit research institutions in Washington are eligible to apply for and receive funding from WTC for collaborative R&D; projects if they meet the program's requirements.
    Traditionally, WTC's Research and Technology Development (RTD) funding awards have been extended to state universities. The program has been opened to include nonprofit research institutions such as the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center as well as private colleges and universities that have technology research programs, personnel and facilities.

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    WTC's RTD program was designed to help companies and researchers bring science out of the laboratory and into the marketplace. WTC's role is to encourage the evolution of a great idea from concept to credible to commerce.

    Often companies think they are limited to partnerships with the state's two most prominent institutions: University of Washington and Washington State University. While many of the proposals do originate from these universities, as well as from Central, Western and Eastern, there are a number of other institutions throughout the state that may qualify as research partners for this program. WTC hopes that the new eligibility requirements will spark more statewide participation in the RTD grant program and open doors to increased partnerships between commercial and research operations in technology development.

    Related WTC links:

  • Research and Technology Development Grant Program

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  • 'Technology as a Tool' grant program provides funds for companies looking to develop business tools and improve processes

    WTC's "Technology as a Tool" program awards up to $20,000 towards funding research necessary to help Washington-based technology companies increase their profitability. A complement to the organization's research grant program, Technology as a Tool helps fund university research studies for work that augments products and services the company already has in place or is in the process of developing. Grant money can be used for operational improvements at this level.

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    While WTC's research grant program is aimed at funding research that directly results in new product development, Technology as a Tool focuses on research partnerships with the potential to optimize a technique or process and that, while not necessary resulting in the creation of a new product, adds direct value to a product or process necessary to improve the company's performance in the market place. Examples of this type of research include market analysis and optimization studies.

    WTC saw the value of offering a grant program that would allow Washington companies to benefit from academic research beyond direct product development. The Technology as a Tool program opens doors for companies to fund research partnerships for optimization or process improvements which in turn may be critical to their long-term commercial success.

    Related WTC links:

  • RTD Grant Program

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  • YK Products case study

    YK Products thought it had a product that could revolutionize road repairs throughout the United States. A research grant through Washington Technology Center proved it to be true and paved the way for this Everett, Washington-based small company to create a new standard in cold asphalt application.

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    Company Profile
    Building off a patented technology, YK Products has secured exclusive rights to manufacture and distribute its proprietary cold-mixed asphalt concrete product in North and South America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand and China, currently sold in the North America under the name U.S. Cold Patch®.

    U.S. Cold Patch® is a fast, permanent, easy-to-use repair material for asphalt and concrete surfaces. What sets Cold Patch® apart from the competition is that is uses recycled asphalt concrete as its main ingredient combined with small amounts of binding material, is an easy-to-apply permanent solution for road repair, and has very low levels of emissions.

    Customer Base
    U.S. Cold Patch's® target market includes state and federal transportation agencies, airports, military organizations, municipal and county public works departments, and private companies such as parking lot maintenance firms.

    Business Situation
    YK Products had been laying the foundation for a successful venture. The company had inroads into its target markets, and production facilities up and running in Puyallup, Washington and Orange, California. YK Products had conducted preliminary testing on their material, but the company was looking for a more comprehensive, objective verification process for their materials to build a stronger case for their product's performance claims and accelerate their growth into these markets.

    A meeting with the City of Seattle's Solid Waste Division pushed YK Products into action and led them to seek grant money from WTC for their research efforts. The level of volatiles in current cold mix asphalt was causing concern from an environmental and waste management perspective. The City of Seattle approached YK products with an interest in U.S. Cold Patch® and King County was willing to contribute funding for materials testing to evaluate its effectiveness and compliance with environmental regulations.

    Research Project
    YK Products and Washington State University were awarded a research grant through WTC's RTD program to gather independent performance data on its product compared to other products currently in use. Environmental and engineering standards assessments were performed by Washington State University's Center for Asphalt Technology, a partnership program between Washington State Department of Transportation, the Washington Asphalt Paving Association, and Washington State University.

    Professors Tom Papagiannakis and Frank Loge with WSU's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering headed up the research project, which was conducted using Superpave® testing methods, the highest caliber processes for testing this type of material and only available in a few select facilities in the country. Testing of this level had never been done on a cold asphalt product; it was generally reserved for hot asphalt treatments, which were believed to be the only methods suitable for permanent paving repairs, and therefore the only type to held up to this level of scrutiny.

    Dr. Papagiannakis says he was attracted to the project for two reasons. First, that the company was a small emerging venture. And second, the green nature of the product. "Here appeared to be a paving product that was made from recycled material, didn't require solvents, and was benign to the environment," Papagiannakis noted.

    The project, completed in February 2004, confirmed that U.S. Cold Patch® outperformed other cold asphalt products on the market overall from both engineering and environmental standards, proving to be a robust product with negligible emissions.

    Applications & Benefits
    For YK Products, the research proved to be a critical factor, especially with reference to establishing performance benchmarks in a comparative/side-by-side test of US Cold Patch® with its competition.

    "The credibility factor from this type of research has had tremendous impact on our company's growth potential," notes John Ackerman, General Manager for YK Products. "This wasn't just a small company-funded test. This is legitimate, third-party evaluation at a facility with excellent stature and reputation in this industry."

    "The independent test clearly demonstrated the superiority of YK's products and identified it as the strongest and best performing cold asphalt on the market as well as being environmentally friendly," explained Ackerman.

    The Future
    Based on the research results, YK Products is releasing a report to current and potential customers outlining the findings from the study, which the company anticipates will be received favorably and result in increased sales.

    The crux of the research has the potential to significantly impact the bulk market, which is the direction that YK Products plans to take. For a bulk market to be viable, a dedicated system needs to be in place to provide YK Products with greater access to the recycled asphalt, which makes up 75% of its product base, in multiple locations. The findings in the research report led to increased inroads into this partnership. YK Products is working with municipalities and the Washington State Department of Transportation to make this happen.

    Results from the grant research also featured prominently in the company's strategic planning efforts, the basis of which is being used to attract key personnel, develop a Quality Control Program to accompany the company's plans to double its current production capacity by adding two new production facilities in Illinois and New York, and expand its distribution throughout North America.

    Related WTC links:

  • YK Products is a WTC client
  • RTD Grant Program

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  • WTC service structure

    Looking forward to the new year, we are pleased to share some of the strategic goals and program outlines for 2004. In order to better serve the broad variety of businesses and entrepreneurs in need of support, we have outlined three service areas. They include: Business Resources -- including our Regional & Technical Services programs -- User Facilities, and New Industries Initiatives.

    Regional & Technical Services is comprised of WTC's grant programs, angel network and small business services. User Facilities refers to WTC's Microfabrication Laboratory. New Industries Initiatives currently focuses on the Northwest Energy Technology Collaborative (NWETC).

    This newsletter will be organized around these business lines as well as feature general WTC highlights or developments. We hope this new structure will give you a greater understanding of WTC's accomplishments and role in promoting technology economic development in Washington state.

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    WTC supports companies' research needs

    WTC awarded funding to the following projects:

    MicroEnergy Technologies, Inc., Vancouver
    Researcher: Dr. Fred Forster, UW Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
    There is a need, both immediate and long-term, for extremely high heat, high temperature, high reliability, and low-cost cooling systems that currently are not available for conventional semiconductor device cooling. Wide Band-Gap semiconductor devices have significant advantages in high temperature and high power applications such as power converters, hybrid electric vehicles, power plants, and radar systems.

    MicroEnergy Technologies, Inc. (MicroET) was launched in 2000 to develop new technologies and products in the areas of thermal engineering and aerosol handling. The company currently is devising an ultra-high heat flux, active cooling module for distributed cooling. Using a piezoelectric micro-pump developed by Dr. Fred Forster of the University of Washington's Department of Mechanical Engineering, MicroET's developing a new fluid transport subsystem that uses microchannels and nanoparticle suspensions as the fluid to maximize the efficiency of coolants.

    The company's cooling modules offer key benefits such as greater heat removal capacity, easy alteration with minimum impact on the system, uniform surface temperatures, and an inexpensive manufacturing process in mass quantities.

    MicroGREEN Polymers, Inc., Stanwood
    Researcher: Dr. Vipin Kumar, University of Washington Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
    Disposable food packaging made from plastics and paper is an $11 billion market. While paper food packaging costs considerably more than conventional plastic foam, it is favored due to environmental and health concerns regarding traditional polystyrene foam.

    MicroGREEN Polymers, Inc., formed in 2002, is a startup company commercializing microcellular plastics technology developed with Dr. Kumar at the University of Washington's Microcellular Plastics Lab. The company plans to manufacture environmentally friendly plastic disposable food packaging. Their patented microcellular plastic polyethylene terephthalate (PET) foams use standard production equipment in a novel way to make a new class of food packaging products that are less expensive, functionally better, and positively impact the environment

    This WTC-funded project is supporting research on a new energy efficient process for producing thermoformed articles such as foam cups and plates. MicroGREEN will study process conditions for producing the PET foam, the effects of CO2 concentration on thermofoaming, and the effects of moisture content on foam quality. MicroGREEN's manufacturing process for disposable food packaging products is energy efficient as well as environmentally friendly.

    Related WTC links:

  • RTD Grant Program

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  • WTC awards spring 2003 Research & Technology Development projects

    In June 2003, WTC awarded R&D; funding to five company-university research teams through its Research & Technology Development (RTD) program. This round of projects is supporting advances in environmental wind forecasting, processing manure as a fuel source, improving power toothbrushes, developing light weight wood-plastic lumber, and devising a novel fruit processing technique. A summary of these research collaborations is featured below.

    3TIER Environmental Forecast Group, Seattle
    Researcher: Dr. Tilmann Gneiting, UW Dept. of Statistics
    3TIER Environmental Forecast Group is a technology company that uses advanced weather and environmental forecasting techniques and computer-based modeling strategies for forecasting renewable energies. The company is researching more accurate methods of short-term forecasting wind energy, the world's fastest growing energy generation source. In conjunction with Dr. Gneiting, 3TIER is developing an algorithm for short-term wind forecasting using multivariate time series and geostatistical space-time techniques.

    Andgar Corp., Ferndale
    Researcher: Dr. Shulin Chen, WSU Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering
    Livestock producers are under increasing pressure, including legal action, to manage manure and process water in a way that controls odors and protects environmental quality. Livestock and livestock products are a $1.5 billion industry in Washington. Anaerobic digesters, also known as biogas recovery systems, are one possible solution to better management of manure and process water.

    Anaerobic digesters use bacteria to breakdown the manure in a chamber while capturing methane, one of the by-products that can be used to generate heat or electricity. Andgar Corporation, based in Ferndale, has expertise in fabrication of components and construction of digesters. Andgar is collaborating with Dr. Shulin Chen to refine development of an enzymatic pretreatment to enable smaller more efficient reaction chambers that put anaerobic digestion within financial reach of more livestock producers.

    Second Act Partners, Inc., Sammamish
    Researcher: Dr. Pierre Mourad, UW Applied Physics Laboratory
    Power toothbrushes have proven to offer clear clinical advantages over manual brushing. Some models have bristles that move at a sonic speed -- i.e., a frequency that can be heard. Dr. Mourad and his investigators are working to develop a power brush using a technology that they believe will improve the ability to clean the teeth and gums. Their research will test a prototype using various combinations of bristle motions. Second Act Partners, a startup company, will draw upon their considerable experience to define the technical requirements of the product for market success.

    Shoreline Industries LLC, Sedro Woolley
    Researcher: Dr. Karl Englund, WSU Wood Materials and Engineering Lab
    Wood plastic composites (WPCs) continue to be an attractive alternative to chemically treated wood and plastic lumber due to their dimensional stability and resistance to bio-deterioration. However, current WPCs are heavy, which has prompted the development of hollow foamed composites to reduce the weight. Dr. Englund and his colleagues at WSU's Wood Materials and Engineering Lab (WMEL) have worked to develop such structural and foamed WPC products. Shoreline Industries, a manufacturer of vinyl-based composite lumber, is using WMEL's resources to develop and test new composites and extrusion methods for PVC/wood flour foamed composites specifically for the residential decking industry.

    Washington Farms, Inc., Tacoma
    Researcher: Dr. Barry Swanson, WSU Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition
    Washington Farms produces 100% fruit pies sold in the Seattle area. The company's ability to market their products outside the state will be made possible by using ultra high pressure technology that pasteurizes fruit products to extend shelf life and maintain a desirable "fresh-like" flavor. In this project, the company will work with Drs. Barry Swanson and Dong-Hyun Kang at WSU's Dept of Food Science and Human Nutrition to develop a process of fruit processing that will inactivate harmful bacteria such as E. coli, inactivate enzymes that "brown" fruit, and maintain "fresh-like" appearance, flavor and texture.

    Related WTC links:

  • RTD Grant Program
  • 3TIER is a WTC client
  • Andgar is a WTC client
  • Second Act Partners is a WTC client
  • Shoreline Industries is a WTC client
  • Washington Farms is a WTC client

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  • Calling all Washington companies with technology needs: New WTC funding program

    WTC wants to help Washington companies use the expertise of our state's research faculty and students to improve the economy -- specifically, to help companies create more jobs. The new Technology as a Tool Program was created for companies that don't quite fit WTC's existing RTD grant program criteria. WTC's RTD funding program focuses on technology companies and university research projects in which results are implemented directly in the company's products.

    The Technology as a Tool Program will award grants of up to $20,000 (no indirect costs taken out) to university faculty collaborating with a Washington company(ies) for projects involving technology. The new program broadens WTC's focus to include collaborations involving the use or implementation of technology. We also aim to increase the number of departments, colleges, and companies that participate in WTC's grant programs.

    Related WTC links:

  • RTD Grant Program

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  • WTC funds more projects

    OMAX Corporation, Kent
    Researcher: Dr. Mamidala Ramulu, UW Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
    OMAX is a supplier of waterjet equipment to the machining market. Their competitive advantage lies in their software and patented control technology. The company is building a remote and unattended version of their JetMachining® Center (JMC). They are teaming with Dr. Ramulu to develop a proof-of-concept prototype consisting of a software algorithm and associated hardware. The company's goal is to improve productivity and ease of use for its customers' machining operations.

    Magic Wheels, Inc., Seattle
    Researcher: Dr. Brian Flinn, University of Washington Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
    Wheelchair users have long sought to transport themselves more efficiently to increase their mobility and independence; and to reduce the strain on their arm joints. Current wheelchairs allow limited mobility on inclines and uneven terrains. Magic Wheels, Inc. has developed a simple, cost-effective mechanism in a 2-speed geared drive wheel that enables wheelchair users to negotiate obstacles such as slopes and challenging surfaces with less strain.

    Magic Wheels™ (also the product) incorporates a patent-pending two-speed gear drive in quick release wheels that can be easily installed on existing wheelchairs. In addition to the extra climbing power provided by the gears, it also offers an advanced hill holding feature (with pushrim override) and a pushrim operated down hill assisted braking feature (for finger tip braking-no more burned hands), without relying on complex electronics or cumbersome motors and batteries. Dr. Brian Flinn is working with the company to test the structural strength of this new manual wheelchair wheel that contains a carbon-fiber composite wheel core.

    Related WTC links:

  • RTD Grant Program
  • OMAX Corporation is a WTC client
  • Magic Wheels™ is a WTC client

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  • WTC awards 2002 research projects

    RTD Awards
    In December 2002, WTC awarded R&D; funding to six company-university research teams through its Research & Technology Development (RTD) program. This round of projects is supporting advances in areas as diverse as pest control, pharmacogenetics, diesel fuel processors, and enhanced asphalt for roads. A summary of these research collaborations is featured below.

    InnovaTek, Inc., Richland
    Researcher: Dr. Patrick Pedrow, WSU School of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
    InnovaTek is developing a diesel-based fuel processor to supply hydrogen for electrical generation by fuel cells. Using a plasma enhanced metal organic chemical vapor deposition system available at WSU, this research collaboration will help InnovaTek test the process of placing metal coatings directly onto microchannel surfaces-a technology it expects will greatly enhance its processor efficiency and reduce manufacturing costs.

    Intelligent Ion, Inc., Seattle
    Researcher: Dr. R. Bruce Darling, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
    Intelligent Ion, Inc. develops products that improve the speed and usability of biological and chemical information. The company is building a new miniature mass spectrometer that will be 75 percent smaller (to fit on a large PC card) and significantly less expensive than existing systems. Under the direction of Professor Darling at the University of Washington, this project will research, design, and build the spectrometer's precise, ultra-small focusing system (electronic and physical optics). This new small, low-priced portable instrument will be usable across a broad range of applications that require immediate, accurate compositional analyses -- including national security, law enforcement, and environmental monitoring.

    Sterling International, Inc., Spokane
    Researcher: Dr. Prashanta Dutta, WSU School of Mechanical & Materials Engineering
    Sterling International manufactures RESCUE® pest control products, which use pheromones to attract the insects. This WTC project teams the company with Dr. Prashanta Dutta to develop a precision micro-pump capable of controlling the dispensing rate of pheromones in insect traps that eventually will be capable of responding to environmental conditions, such as turning on or off at night. This system will be both inexpensive and use little power. With no moving parts, it is an ideal solution for battery-operated traps with a long operating life.

    Survival, Inc., Seattle
    Researcher: Dr. Brian Flinn, UW Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
    Survival provides chemical defense and ballistic protection technologies to military and homeland defense personnel. While current fiber or composite wrapped ceramic plates offer limited multi-hit protection, they are too heavy to be used for full-body protection. The company is researching lightweight, multi-hit protective systems that do not impair mobility, cause distracting discomfort, or induce fatigue. Survival has teamed with Dr. Brian Flinn to develop a concept for a multi-material, multi-layer solution that will leverage new uses for existing materials, new textile technology, and manufacturing processes to put a superior, affordable armor on the market.

    VizX Labs, LLC, Seattle
    Researcher: Dr. Daniel Sabath, UW Dept. of Laboratory Medicine
    VizX Labs is a life science technology company delivering knowledge discovery systems that enhance researchers' understanding of genetic mechanisms of disease. The diagnosis, treatment, and prediction of outcome from treatment of diseases such as cancer would substantially improve if tests were available to more precisely characterize various forms of the disease. VizX and Dr. Sabath are developing laboratory and software methodology to simultaneously measure the expression of multiple genes using DNA microarrays, to determine which genes are active in a blood or tissue sample. DNA microarrays will allow doctors to provide customized therapies by understanding the basis of disease at a molecular level.

    YK Products, LLC, Everett
    Researcher: Dr. A.T. Papagiannakis, WSU Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering
    YK Products manufactures cold-mixed asphalt that is used primarily to fill potholes and other paving maintenance applications. Using WSU's state-of-the-art Center for Asphalt Technology and Laboratory of Atmospheric Research, this project will develop an engineering and environmental assessment of an innovative cold-mixed asphalt concrete that incorporates largely recycled material and hardens under the action of traffic without perceivable emissions of harmful chemicals. The collaborators will track the performance of repairs over time and compute survivability curves to better guide future uses and applications.

    EA and FTI Awards
    In addition to the Research and Technology Development (RTD) program, WTC has two programs that facilitate fast-track industry-university research collaborations. The Entrepreneur's Access (EA) and Focused Technology Initiative (FTI) programs are ideally suited to assist small businesses and startup enterprises in collaborative technology development. Both programs are available throughout the year.

    FTIs provide up to $10,000–$30,000 for a project duration of 6–12 months and are targeted for companies with fewer than 100 employees. EAs fund a maximum amount of $5,000 for 3–6 month projects to companies with 15 or fewer employees.

    The following projects received awards in 2002.

    Allez PhysiOnix, Ltd., Kirkland
    Researchers: Dr. Michel Kliot and Dr. Pierre Mourad, UW Dept. of Neurological Surgery
    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is an extremely important determinant of brain function. At present, ICP can only be measured by performing a neurosurgical procedure in which a hole is drilled into the skull and a catheter is inserted into the space above the brain, into the brain itself, or into the brain's deep ventricular system. The risks of this procedure (hemorrhage, stroke, and infection) must be weighed against its benefit. Drs. Kliot and Mourad are working with Allez PhysiOnix to test a novel device that can measure ICP noninvasively. This device also would allow the procedure to be done both in and outside of a hospital setting, with or without an attending neurosurgeon.

    IsoRay, Inc., Richland
    Researcher: Dr. Mark Phillips, UW Medical Center's Cancer Center
    IsoRay was formed to develop radioactive "seeds" use to treat confined prostate cancer and other solid tumors. IsoRay is using a new radioisotrope with a shorter half life and higher dose rate than isotopes currently being used. The goal is to provide a seed that is better able to kill all cancer cells while minimizing side effects. The company has partnered with Dr. Phillips to evaluate the radiological properties and radiobiological characteristics of IsoRay's seeds as well as prepare a treatment planning computer program.

    Isotron Corp., Seattle
    Researcher: Dr. Buddy Ratner, UW Engineered Biomaterials Center
    This team is developing a technology to provide semi-permeable reactive fabric coatings that can protect field troops, and industrial and healthcare workers in case of exposure to hazardous biological agents. This technology can also be applied to decontaminate drinking water systems. These industrial coatings are based on nanoparticle technology. Specifically, the company is working with Dr. Ratner to develop a new nanoparticle species that is capable of capturing and holding oxidant reactive species in a bioavailable state.

    Leak Indicator Paint Systems (LIPS), Inc., Tacoma
    Researcher: Dr. Gamal Khalil, UW Dept. of Chemistry
    LIPS, Inc. is developing a microporous material that can remove arsenic in drinking water. The company believes this low-cost product will help small drinking water systems meet the new federal arsenic standard. This research collaboration is gathering data on surface areas, micropore structure, and loading capacity of a new microporous absorbent.

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    Eleven industry-university collaborations receive funding from Washington Technology Center

    For Immediate Release: July 15, 2002

    Seattle - Washington Technology Center (WTC) awarded $930,000 in June 2002 to university researchers teamed with eleven Washington-based companies through WTC's Research and Technology Development (RTD) program.

    The companies, located in areas across the state, are working with researchers from either Washington State University or the University of Washington.

    Caldus Semiconductor, Richland
    Researcher: M. Grant Norton, WSU School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering
    Caldus Semiconductor develops silicon carbide-based semiconductor packages for high temperature sensors that can be used in harsh environments, such as those found in fuel cells and the catalytic reformer. The recent move of fuel cells into the mainstream of energy generation provides huge opportunities and requirements for the company's robust sensor technology. They will collaborate with M. Grant Norton and Hussein M. Zbib of WSU to study interface structures formed during processing as well as to develop a model of the package design that will be used as a predictive tool for package performance and to shorten development time. Dr. Norton has extensive experience in the use of electron microscopy for interface characterization. Dr. Zbib's expertise is in the areas of solid mechanics, plasticity, dislocations and applications to manufacturing processes.

    General Dynamics Space Propulsion Systems, Redmond
    Researcher: Todd A. Anderson, UW Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics
    General Dynamics Space Propulsion Systems provides on-board propulsion for spacecraft using a range of technologies from conventional chemical engines to advanced electric propulsion systems that accelerate electrically charged plasmas. At the heart of the latest propulsion technology, the Hall thruster, are high performance electromagnets that accelerate ionized xenon gas to speeds up to 20 km/s. The company is teaming with Todd Anderson of the UW to produce innovative, high temperature, compact, lightweight electromagnetic assemblies. Dr. Anderson has expertise in embedded sensors and multifunctional structures and especially materials. The team believes that by combining the right conductor and insulator materials with an unusual coil topology, the mass of these critical assemblies can be cut in half, while providing high reliability in severe thermal, vibration and radiation environments.

    GenPrime, Spokane
    Researcher: Dong-Hyun Kang, WSU Dept. of Food Sciences and Human Nutrition
    GenPrime specializes in developing microbial measurement kits for product quality management in the beer, dairy, and other food industries. Dong-Hyun Kang of WSU is collaborating with GenPrime to develop a method to test for coliforms, or bacteria that make humans sick, in half the time of current methods for a fraction of the cost. Dr. Kang is a food safety specialist with expertise in detection of food-borne pathogens.

    MCD Technologies, Tacoma
    Researcher: Juming Tang, WSU Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering
    MCD Technologies manufactures drying equipment for use in the food processing, nutraceutical, pharmaceutical, chemical, and waste treatment industries using Refractance Window™ technology to gently, efficiently, and cost-effectively remove moisture from delicate products. MCD Technologies is collaborating with Juming Tang of WSU to evaluate the aroma, color, flavor, and nutrient level of this proprietary heat transfer technology adapted to food evaporation. Dr. Tang has expertise in food drying technologies, microwave heating, and heat and mass transfer simulation in food processing operations.

    Mimic Technologies, Seattle
    Researcher: George M. Turkiyyah, UW Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Mimic Technologies is developing computer simulation hardware and software that will allow medical personnel to practice their surgical skills before trying them on people. This new technology provides feedback on internal stress and strain as simulated tissue is manipulated, which allows surgical tasks to be performed and evaluated in real time. Mimic has teamed with George Turkiyyah of the UW and the UW Human Interface Technology (HIT) Laboratory to develop a realistic, real-time suturing simulator. A central feature of this technology is its ability to allow the doctor in training to feel the procedure and see surgical tools interacting with simulated tissue via a new breed of human-computer interaction hardware that brings the sense of touch to the desktop experience. Dr. Turkiyyah is an expert in finite element modeling, scientific computing, and geometric modeling.

    Recycled Plastics Marketing, Redmond
    Researcher: Vipin Kumar, UW Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
    Once thought of as waste, recycled milk and orange juice jugs have found a new use as environmentally-friendly plastic lumber. Recycled Plastics Marketing (RPM) manufactures plastic lumber products in its Tacoma production plant from 100% recycled High-Density Polyethylene plastic, the same material used for many beverage containers. RPM has teamed with Vipin Kumar of the UW to increase its production rate with more efficient heat extraction and a reduction in batch-to-batch variation. Dr. Kumar's research interests include polymer processing and manufacturing with extensive work in microcellular plastics technology.

    Sienna Technologies, Woodinville
    Researcher: Yasuo Kuga, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
    Sienna Technologies manufactures high performance aluminum nitride components for demanding thermal management in electronics and microwave communications applications. Sienna Technologies and Yasuo Kuga of the UW are researching a new family of microwave communications lens materials, Functionally Graded Artificial Dielectrics (FGAD) materials and meta-materials. FGADs allow microwave lenses to be much smaller and lighter than traditional lenses by bending microwave energy throughout the entire lens, rather than just at the lens surface like traditional lenses. Dr. Kuga will analytically and numerically model FGAD materials using his expertise in electromagnetics. Sienna Technologies will then fabricate FGAD samples as modeled for evaluation and testing. Dr. Kuga has expertise in electromagnetics and remote sensing.

    Sonus Pharmaceuticals, Bothell
    Researcher: Jin-Gang Zhang, WSU Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences
    Sonus Pharmaceuticals develops therapeutic drugs using its drug delivery technology platform, which features a vitamin E-based oil-in-water emulsion to promote the solubility of lipophilic (fat-soluble, non-water soluble) drugs that require novel drug delivery formulations for effective delivery into the body. Encapsulating injectable cancer killing drugs in a vitamin E emulsion may lower the toxicity of the formulation, which could lead to a product that can be administered more easily to patients with fewer side effects and better efficacy. Dr. Marc Fariss of WSU has discovered a class of vitamin E derivatives that have the ability to selectively kill human tumor cells while protecting normal tissue. This project teams Drs. Fariss and Zhang of WSU with Sonus to investigate the ability of Sonus's platform as well as its vitamin E components to selectively enhance the antitumor activity of chemotherapeutic agents. Dr. Zhang has expertise in the mechanisms of vitamin E derivative-mediated cytoprotection and antitumor activity.

    Syntrix Biosystems, Redmond
    Researcher: William M. Atkins, UW Dept. of Medicinal Chemistry
    Syntrix Biosystems has developed a microchip platform for drug discovery that avoids the coding and decoding constraints of other chips. Syntrix is collaborating with William Atkins of UW to validate the ability of Syntrix's Combi-Chip™ to screen and identify drug candidates. The project aims to use the microchip platform to identify promising cancer therapeutics by allowing large combinatorial libraries to be synthesized and screened. Dr. Atkins is an expert in the enzymology of glutathione-S-transferases, the promising cancer therapeutic targets that are the focus of the project.

    Systematix Controls, Tukwila
    Researcher: Richard R. Gustafson, UW College of Forest Resources
    Systematix Controls manufactures pulp and paper process control systems. The company is collaborating with Richard Gustafson, UW professor of Paper Science and Engineering, to further develop an optical sensor for measuring lignin content of individual wood fibers. Lignin is the natural glue that holds cellulose fibers together in wood and must be removed when making paper and pulp products. The sensor, originally developed with support from UW's Center for Process Analytical Chemistry, the U.S. Dept. of Energy, and pulp and paper companies, will allow paper and pulp mills to produce a more uniform product. Dr. Gustafson's expertise is in the area sensors and control of pulp and paper systems, recently focusing on single fiber analysis techniques.

    VisionGate, Gig Harbor
    Researcher: Eric J. Seibel, UW Human Interface Technology Lab
    VisionGate is developing a new high throughput cell analysis platform that automatically performs 3-dimensional analysis of biological cells. VisionGate has teamed with Eric Seibel of UW to further develop this new technology capable of screening for early detection of lung cancer. The technology uses Flow Optical Tomography (FOT) to take a series of snapshots of cells and recombine them as a 3-dimensional image showing subtle changes in the cells that may be associated with cancer. The project aims to develop an optical bench prototype and assess the photonics issues leading to clearly focused images with adequate brightness. Dr. Seibel, a bioengineer, has expertise in custom fiberoptic point sources and integration into medical imaging systems.

    Related WTC links:

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  • Pacific Research Laboratories "boning up" for medical research and training

    Ever wonder how surgeons hone their skills or practice new and difficult procedures? Plastic bone models have played an increasingly important role in educating medical students and patients, training orthopedic surgeons and testing medical devices.

    Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc. of Vashon Island, Washington, is a leading producer of artificial bones, Sawbones®, designed to simulate the bone architecture as well as the bone's physical properties. These training models allow demonstration and practice of different procedures that can enhance medical research and treatment. Therefore, having true-to-life models are crucial.

    During the last two decades, Pacific Research Laboratories has made a variety of bone structures synthetically -- by mimicking the architecture and strength of natural bone. Various aspects of bone shape, size and its complex internal structure make it difficult to manufacture artificial models. Products currently on the market have a hollow medullary canal with closed cell urethane foam interiors at the ends, not the open celled cancellous (the porous honeycomb structure inside bones) interiors found at ends of real bones. One of greatest challenges in simulating real bone is the modeling of cancellous bone.

    Continuing to be a leader in the artificial bone market, the company has been working to develop these cancellous bone models.

    In July 2000, WTC funded a project teaming Pacific Research with Dr. Susmita Bose of Washington State University's School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering to develop the first artificial open-celled cancellous bone model. WTC's participation helped Pacific Research Laboratories speed up development and lower the company's financial risk in ultimately bringing a beneficial new product to market.

    Using Sawbones provided by Pacific Research Laboratories, Dr. Bose and her colleagues have been experimenting with various materials and processes, trying to achieve the natural strength and architecture of cancellous bone. Materials used to make these bone models are polyurethane-based polymers, ceramic powders, and organic solvents. In the last year and a half, the team of researchers has developed some models attaining the proper architecture and is working to perfect the strength properties of real bone.

    Related WTC links:

  • Pacific Research Laboratories is a WTC client

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  • WTC awards new FTI project

    In addition to the Research and Technology Development (RTD) program, WTC has two programs that facilitate fast-track industry-university research collaborations. The Entrepreneur's Access (EA) and Focused Technology Initiative (FTI) programs are ideally suited to assist small businesses and startup enterprises in collaborative technology development. Both programs are available throughout the year.

    FTIs provide up to $10,000–$30,000 and are targeted for companies with under 100 employees with a project duration of 6–12 months.

    Bio~OriGyn, LLC, Spokane
    Researcher: C. Harold Mielke, WSU Health Research and Education Center
    To meet medical blood transfusion demands, there is a critical need for a continuous supply of fresh human blood platelets. However, because of inferior storage methods, much of the nation's supply of platelets is discarded every year -- at a loss to the industry of nearly $300M. Since 1994, OriGyn Technologies has specialized in cell storage and in vitro handling systems, discovering a proprietary plant sugar currently used in their infertility products. These sugars, by reducing cellular oxidative stress during handling, can be used to improve the storage of blood products. In the FTI project funded by WTC, Bio~OriGyn is working with Dr. Mielke to develop a novel liquid storage system for banking fresh human platelets that not only prolongs platelet viability, but also improves functional capacity following collection and storage. Dr. Mielke is an expert on blood platelets and is the founder and Editor Emeritus of the Journal of Clinical Apheresis, a journal specializing in blood banking, blood cell separations and blood cell storage.

    Related WTC links:

  • Bio~OriGyn is a WTC client
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  • WTC Awards 2000-01 FTI Projects

    In addition to the Research and Technology Development (RTD) program, WTC has two programs that facilitate fast-track industry-university research collaborations. The Entrepreneur's Access (EA) and Focused Technology Initiative (FTI) programs are ideally suited to assist small businesses and startup enterprises in collaborative technology development. Both programs are available throughout the year.

    FTIs provide up to $10,000–$30,000 and are targeted for companies with under 100 employees with a project duration of 6–12 months.

    Advanced Materials and Manufacturing

    Nu Element, Inc., Tacoma
    Researcher: Fatih Dogan, UW Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
    An alternative energy company founded in 1998, Nu Element is targeting the commercialization of reliable, cost-effective power sources for households and businesses. Currently, the company is concentrating on patent pending technology of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells, and developing new materials for low operating temperature solid oxide fuel cells - the focus of this project.

    ARI Technologies, Inc., Kent
    Researcher: Robert Holtz, UW Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering
    Founded in 1990, ARI Technologies has developed thermochemical treatment technology that converts hazardous wastes to a non-hazardous and benign end product. This project will evaluate the engineering properties and environmental characteristics and stability of this end product to assess its suitability for landfill and other commercial civil engineering applications.

    Sienna Technologies, Inc., Woodinville
    Researcher: Mehmet Sarikaya, UW Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
    Founded in 1992, Sienna Technologies develops aluminum nitride components for high power electronics and microwave communications industries. Occasionally, components will contain visual defects that, while not affecting performance, require the parts be reprocessed. The goal of this project is to identify, analyze and eliminate the source of this cosmetic defect in Sienna's aluminum nitride products.

    LAB / COR, Inc., Seattle
    Researcher: Thomas Stoebe, UW Dept. of Material Sciences & Engineering
    Founded in 1992, LAB / COR provides sophisticated particulate characterization and analyses for environmental remediation and industrial process development and control. The company is interested in developing particulate filters not currently available on the market. This project explores the use of tape casting and SHS-derived SiC ceramic compounds, materials with great promise for high temperature applications, for improved hot-gas particulate filters and traps.

    Recycled Plastics Marketing, Inc., Redmond
    Researcher: Vipin Kumar, UW Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
    Using recycled high-density polyethylene, RPM produces plastic lumbers for fencing, decking, park benches, and other construction applications. This project will develop methods to increase lumber cooling rates with minimal impact to the current production process. The ability to cool the lumber faster will enable the lumber to be produced at a higher speed.

    Biotechnology and Biomedical Devices

    EKOS Corporation, Bothell
    Researcher: Fatih Dogan, UW Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
    Founded in 1995, EKOS is focused on developing proprietary ultrasound-based systems and devices for local drug delivery. Highly reliable piezoelectric ceramic transducers are crucial to the success of the devices developed by EKOS. This project works towards the development of such transducers by identifying the failure mechanisms of the ceramic material and developing improved material strength.

    Sonotech, Inc., Bellingham
    Researcher: Buddy Ratner, UW Dept. of Engineered Biomaterials
    Founded in 1986, Sonotech is a major supplier of medical and industrial ultrasound couplants in the U.S. The project will develop acoustic couplant materials in gel or thickened liquid form for use with medical ultrasound imaging probes in surgical and transcutaneous puncture procedures where in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability are essential to patient health and safety.

    Computer Systems

    dB Systems, Inc., Redmond
    Researcher: Jeff Bilmes, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
    dB Systems produces high-reliability cockpit aircraft audio control equipment and is interested in adding voice command capabilities to their line of avionics audio panel systems. The project will develop and test a new approach to voice recognition to be used for controlling various avionics instruments during noisy in-flight conditions.

    Microelectronics

    Inova, Inc., Richland
    Researcher: Benjamin Belzer, WSU Dept. of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
    Inova develops, markets and manufactures innovative human-to-computer interfaces, including the Magi™ IT network management system. The company is designing a wireless KVMS switch for network server monitoring systems, which they hope will compete with and ultimately replace existing wired monitoring systems.

    Related WTC links:

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  • WTC takes its show on the road

    WTC participated in a unique opportunity to showcase exciting new technologies at the 2001 Association of Washington Business' (AWB) annual Legislative Reception. Held at the WestCoast Olympia Hotel, this event is one of the largest gatherings of business leaders and public officials in Washington. A record 500 people attended this year.

    In preparation for the event, companies and researchers developed exhibits and product demonstrations featuring WTC-funded projects. Attendees received hands-on experience with new and future products from:

    -- Decagon Devices, Pullman, device to analyze freezing characteristics of food, soils, and other materials.
    -- EKOS Corporation, Bothell, ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery system.
    -- Mikron Industries, Inc., Kent, improved materials for vinyl window and door products.
    -- Radiant Optics, Inc., Woodinville, high efficiency radiant heaters.
    -- StressWave, Inc., Kent, process to improve metal fatigue.
    -- UNIBEST International Corp., Pasco, ion capsules for soil testing.
    -- UW Human Interface Technology Lab, Seattle, "MagicBook": 3D imaging via computer interface.

    Related WTC links:

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  • WTC awards 10 research and technology projects

    For Immediate Release: February 20, 2001

    Seattle - In December 2000, WTC awarded over $1.2 million in R&D; funding to 10 company / university research teams through its Research & Technology Development (RTD) program. The RTD program is one of three WTC funding mechanisms that helps companies develop, refine, or test new products using the scientific and engineering expertise of researchers at the state's universities.

    Between 1995 and 2000, companies and researchers participating in WTC projects were able to attract $167.25 million in follow-on investment from private and federal sources. This is an 11-times leverage of the state's $15.54 million investment in WTC.

    More than 50 percent of the current funding went to Washington State University's five projects, with four awards made to the University of Washington and one to Eastern Washington University.

    This cycle's round of projects is supporting advances in areas as diverse as electric power production, wireless communications, milk pasteurization, antioxidant research, and genome sequencing. A summary of these research collaborations is featured below.

    Awards in Advanced Materials & Manufacturing

    InnovaTek, Inc., Richland
    Researcher: Philip C. Malte, UW Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
    InnovaTek is an early-stage technology-based company that creates innovative solutions for health, safety and energy applications. Working with Dr. Malte, the company is developing and testing a fuel injection component for a diesel and natural gas-based fuel processor to supply hydrogen for electrical generation - creating a power production technology that can use the nation's current fuel distribution infrastructure to provide a clean, quiet and energy-efficient electrical energy generating system.

    Saint-Gobain Crystals & Detectors, Washougal
    Researcher: Albert E. Segall, WSU Dept. of Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering
    Saint-Gobain is a leading supplier of sapphire substrates, a favored material used as a substrate for blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers. Their project will develop a process to optimize production of high quality sapphire wafers, reducing manufacturing time while meeting tightened quality requirements.

    Awards in Computer Systems

    SuperTel Technologies, Inc., Redmond
    Researcher: Ming-Ting Sun, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
    SuperTel designs and develops wireless voice and data communications products for commercial and business applications. They are teaming with UW researchers to investigate and implement Wireless Local Loop (WLL), a technology that uses fixed or mobile radio transceivers to provide telephone services. WLL is an alternative to telephone lines or cellular services, which are costly and sometimes difficult to install and maintain.

    Flat Spin Media, LLC, Spokane
    Researcher: Michael Hendryx, WSU-Spokane, Health Policy and Administration
    Flat Spin Media, an information technology-based hardware and software development company, is developing an electronic touchscreen notebook device for data collection. The company is collaborating with Dr. Hendryx to design a mental health survey application for their device. This technology can help health care system providers survey clients rapidly, efficiently and confidentially, thus enhancing their clinical management and accountability.

    Awards in Biotechnology / Biomedical Devices

    Avista Utilities, Spokane
    Researcher: Gustavo V. Barbosa-Canovas, WSU Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering
    Dr. Barbosa-Canovas is collaborating with Avista, a natural gas and electricity utility, and Inland Northwest Dairies to develop an augmented milk pasteurization process using pulsed electric fields to obtain a product of better quality and longer shelf life. Energy requirements are expected to be significantly less than the requirements of competing processes.

    GenPrime, Inc., Spokane
    Researcher: Jim Fleming, EWU Dept. of Biology
    GenPrime, a biotech company, has developed and is selling test kits for determining microbe concentrations in the cultured dairy and brewing industries. Funds will support generating a new rapid test for raw milk, which will alert farmers to contaminated milk within minutes - rather than after the milk has gone to the dairy processor.

    La Haye Laboratories, Inc., Redmond
    Researcher: Boon P. Chew, WSU Dept. of Animal Sciences
    La Haye Labs is a developer, manufacturer and marketer of natural pharmaceutical, nutritional or dietary supplement products intended primarily for humans. Their latest product is astaZANTHIN™, an all-natural antioxidant that has shown promise in many areas including cardiovascular diseases, dermatology and cancer. Antioxidants are thought to prevent certain types of cell damage associated with artery disease and aging, but their usefulness has not been proved. Project funds will help support studies of the product's possible immune-enhancing activity, a step that is necessary for the product to be accepted as a nutritional or dietary supplement.

    Micronics, Redmond
    Researcher: Albert Folch, UW Dept. of Bioengineering
    Micronics is a leading developer of microfluidics-based solutions for application in life science (genomics), in-vitro medical diagnostics and analytical chemistry markets. Their proprietary technologies enable companies to perform chemical analyses faster, less expensively and with less complexity. Dr. Folch will collaborate with Micronics to develop a unique microfluidic device that will generate a large number of different mixtures by combining a few input compounds.

    Molecular Kinetics, Inc., Pullman
    Researcher: A. Keith Dunker, WSU School of Molecular Biosciences
    Molecular Kinetics is a biotech company that markets equipment used for experiments aimed at understanding protein structure and function. With the recent completion of the DNA sequencing of the Human Genome Project, researchers are now looking to ascertain functions for the 35,000+ proteins in the human genome - opening avenues to improve all areas of human life. This project will focus on developing software tools for prediction and identification of regions of order and disorder in proteins.

    RationalDiagnostics, LLC, Seattle
    Researcher: Daniel E. Sabath, UW Dept. of Laboratory Medicine
    RationalDiagnostics is a startup clinical genomics company whose goal is to develop novel diagnostic tools based on the discovery of disease-specific genes. The company is currently focusing on identifying genes whose patterns of expression distinguish different types of B cell lymphomas and developing a highly sensitive lymphoma diagnostic tool. Better diagnostic tools are expected to improve the management of lymphoma patients and may yield molecular targets useful for developing new drug treatments.

    Awards in Optical Systems

    ALL-OPTICAL DEVICES

    Washington State University
    Researcher: Alexander D.Q. Li, Dept. of Chemistry
    Current optical fiber technology is hampered by some network protocols that require optical fiber signals to be processed electronically. Developing all optical, fiber optic-based devices can be much more cost-effective and bandwidth (capacity) efficient. This project will explore synthesizing new organic electro-optic materials that are critical for polymer optical fiber devices in ultra-high speed telecommunications.

    OPTICAL SWITCHES

    University of Washington
    Researcher: Daniel T. Chiu, Dept. of Chemistry
    There is an urgent need for high-speed and high-density optical switches to handle the ever-increasing demand of internet and telephone traffic. The current state-of-the-art switching device has a switching speed in the range of milliseconds. This project will develop laser-induced switches, which can potentially enable speeds in the nano- to microsecond range.

    University of Washington
    Researcher: Alex K.-Y. Jen, Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
    This project will develop low cost, high speed, wide bandwidth, low loss, and low power consumption electro-optic polymer materials for optical switch and modulators used in computing and telecommunications applications.

    Related WTC links:

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  • WTC Awards spring 2000 research & technology projects

    Washington's technology-based companies are getting a boost in their product R&D;, thanks to the technical assistance and funding programs provided by Washington Technology Center (WTC). In July 2000, WTC awarded over $1.1 million in R&D; funding to 11 company / university research teams through its Research & Technology Development (RTD) program. The RTD program is one of three WTC funding mechanisms that helps companies develop, refine, or test new products using the scientific and engineering expertise of researchers at the state's universities.

    This year's round of projects aims to make advances in areas as diverse as high frequency medical imaging, plastic bone models, and improved streaming video. A summary of these research collaborations is featured below.

    Company partners have projected product revenues generated by these projects to exceed $125 million by 2002. As a result, these companies also predict that more than 277 high-tech jobs will be created by 2005.

    Awards in Advanced Materials & Manufacturing

    Advanced Silicon Materials LLC, Moses Lake
    Researcher: David F. Bahr, WSU School of Mechanical & Materials Engineering
    Advanced Silicon Materials is a leading producer of polycrystalline silicon, the feed material used by silicon wafer manufacturers in the growth of single crystal silicon ingots. The focus of the project is to develop tests to monitor the fracture toughness of machined polysilicon rods, so that breakage during handling can be eliminated.

    ATL Ultrasound, Bothell
    Researcher: Amit Bandyopadhyay, WSU School of Mechanical & Materials Engineering
    ATL is a worldwide leader in the manufacturing, distribution and service of diagnostic medical ultrasound systems. The project will design and develop high element count, high frequency micro-machined medical ultrasound transducers for skin, eye and heart imaging.

    Awards in Computer Systems

    RealNetworks, Inc., Seattle
    Researcher: Eve A. Riskin, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
    RealNetworks is a leader in streaming media - a way to make information such as audio and video available in real-time over the Internet. This project will implement code that improves performance of RealNetworks' streaming video over the World Wide Web and in wireless networks by minimizing image loss during periods of network congestion.

    Awards in Biotechnology / Biomedical Devices

    Amplicon Express, Pullman
    Researcher: Jerry J. Reeves, WSU Dept. of Animal Sciences
    One goal of livestock management is to keep heifers in the feedlot from becoming pregnant. Dr. Reeves and Amplicon Express, a marketer of genetic and microbiological products, are collaborating on a project to develop and test a hormone fusion protein for use as a sterilization vaccine in cattle.

    Sterling International, Veradale
    Researcher: Donald S. Matteson, WSU Dept. of Chemistry
    Museum collections - plants, animals, books, mummies, etc. - are susceptible to attack from Stegobium paniceum and Lasioderma serricorne, two species of beetles. Sterling International, manufacturer of non-toxic pest control products, is teaming up with Dr. Donald Matteson to develop pilot scale synthesis of pheromones that will attract these beetles into traps.

    UNIBEST International Corporation, Pasco
    Researcher: Joan R. Davenport, WSU Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences
    Farmers use soil testing and in recent years, plant tissue testing to determine if and how much fertilizer to apply to crops. Applying too much fertilizer can cost farmers both in the cost of the fertilizer and in reduced yield. UNIBEST has developed an ion exchange resin pellet that measures only those nutrients that are bioavailable to the plant and at a lower cost. Dr. Davenport is doing commercial field studies as well as research plot studies to develop protocols for the placement and use of the pellets.

    Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc., Vashon
    Researcher: Susmita Bose, WSU School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering
    Pacific Research makes Sawbones™, artificial bones used for training doctors and veterinarians, and for testing medical devices. Sawbones™ are designed to simulate the bone architecture as well as the bone's physical properties. Dr. Bose will experiment with polymers and ceramic powders to develop a model of the appearance and physical and mechanical properties of cancellous bone - the porous honeycomb structure inside bones.

    Awards in Microelectronics

    Advanced Hardware Architectures, Inc., Pullman
    Researcher: Benjamin Belzer, WSU School of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
    Advanced Hardware Architectures is a fabless semiconductor design firm that is expanding into the wireless data communication market. This project will develop an error control coding architecture to provide high-performance, complexity-limited error coding and modulation circuits.

    HyperLynx, Redmond
    Researcher: Leung Tsang, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
    HyperLynx is a leading supplier of high-speed signal integrity, electromagnetic compatibility and crosstalk simulation products that are used by companies designing digital systems operating at frequencies above 1 GHz. This project proposes to develop advanced computational methods for predicting the effects of integrated-circuit packages on high-speed digital signals. The goal is to decrease system failure and improve performance in signal quality.

    IntelliSense Inc. (ISI), Indianola
    Researcher: R. Bruce Darling, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
    The collaboration between ISI and the UW will develop a new type of ion source for an ultra-miniature mass spectrometer. For use initially in providing real-time chemical analysis of air quality and process gas composition, this breakthrough instrument will be the smallest, lowest cost, lowest power consumption, fully functional instrument of its type on the market.

    OC Technologies, LLC, Seattle
    Researcher: Karl F. Bohringer, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
    OC Technologies develops electrochemical sensors for water analysis, and switching and sensing technologies. This project will research, design and build a prototype fiber-optic routing switch for telecommunications system applications that is compact, low power and significantly faster than current products.

    Related WTC links:

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  • MesoSystems' new "smart" coatings collect deadly airborne pathogens

    For Immediate Release: March 24, 2000

    WTC sponsors research in biological warfare detection systems

    Seattle - MesoSystems, a Richland, Wash. biotechnology, company has teamed with Buddy Ratner, UW Bioengineered Materials Program, to develop thermally responsive "smart" coatings for an air sampler that collects airborne pathogens such as anthrax for rapid detection. WTC established the research partnership and is funding the project through its MEMS Initiative.

    MesoSystems, Inc. released the device, Realtime BioCapture™, on the market a few months ago. When used with Mesosystems' companion product, RealTime BioSensor™, the system is capable of detecting the presence of disease-causing microbes in minutes.

    Originally created for the military, BioCapture equips emergency responders such as police, firefighters and medical personnel to respond to biological terrorist attacks. "Current methods for detecting airborne pathogens take at least 24 hours because the air samples need to be incubated," says Chuck Call, President of MesoSystems. "BioCapture is an important new product for emergency responders because it reduces the amount of time personnel spend inside the hot zone." The device is currently being field tested by fire departments in major metropolitan areas, including the City of Seattle. Other uses for the product include monitoring for airborne infections in hospitals and microbiological hazards in meat packing facilities

    New coatings being developed will enhance the air sampler's efficiency in collecting, concentrating and isolating pathogens. At room temperature, pathogens stick to the coatings, like flies to fly paper. When heated, the pathogens separate from the coating for analysis. Established in 1998, MesoSystems has grown from two to 24 people, and predicts 100% revenue growth this year. Their primary markets are military and civilian defense, medical and public health markets.

    Related WTC links:

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  • New material meets need for microwave communications

    Microwave communications systems offer high-speed line-of-sight wireless data transmission for applications such as mobile telephony products, satellite broadcasting and defense communications. Components of the vacuum tubes that generate microwaves contain beryllia (BeO), which was recently listed as a hazardous material by the Environmental Protection Agency. That classification has necessitated the development of an alternative material.

    Sienna Technologies, Inc. (STI), Woodinville, had developed a ceramic material based on aluminum nitride (AlN) that could substitute for BeO, but the company lacked the equipment and technology to test the material's performance under microwave frequencies. STI teamed with Yasuo Kuga, UW Electrical Engineering Dept., on an FTI project that would accomplish this objective.

    "Timing was everything on this project," says Ender Savrun, president of STI. "Professor Kuga and his team came through beautifully for us. Not only did we get access to equipment we needed, but Kuga came up with a measuring technique that validated our product."

    The company realized sales from the product before the project was officially over, including a $600,000 contract with the Navy to develop vacuum tube components for defense communications. The Navy also contributed $100,000 toward Kuga's efforts to make the measurement technique user-friendlier.

    Company growth has been another result of the project. A six-person company at the start of the project, STI recently hired two more employees and plans to add two more within the next three months. According to Savrun, "This is only the beginning."
    Related WTC links:

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  • LizardTech focuses on high-resolution images for wireless networks

    LizardTech, Seattle, is a developer of image compression software that gives users the ability to reduce the file size of large images by as much as 40 to 1 with no loss of resolution. This compression utility, called MrSID, allows image managers the flexibility to store and distribute images through a variety of channels including local computer networks or over the Internet. Current markets for the product are geospatial imagery such as maps and aerial photography, publishing, and health care imagery.

    WTC is funding an FTI project between LizardTech and Eve Riskin, UW Electrical Engineering Dept., to conduct research that would enable the software to transmit digital images over wireless networks. With this added functionality, users could view images on wireless hand-held devices such as Palm Pilots, cell phones, and other wireless communications products. Currently, because the rates of wireless data transmission are so much slower than wired links, graphics can't be transmitted to wireless devices. "The forward error correction technique we apply aims to maximize the expected signal-to-noise ratio of the image under a model of packet loss on the communication channel," says Eve Riskin. "The goal is that the first few passes of the image are received quickly, even in the event of extreme data loss. This will enable a useful image to be reconstructed right away and will prevent stalling."

    This project is part of LizardTech's overall plan to enter the e-commerce and consumer markets. LizardTech, a 70-person company, estimates that 20 new jobs will be created as a result of the project.

    Related WTC links:

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  • WTC assists Spokane companies with product research and development

    For Immediate Release: January 25, 2000

    Seattle - Spokane, Wash. companies engaged in product development can benefit from the funding and technical assistance of Washington Technology Center (WTC). The state-sponsored organization helps companies with R&D; in two ways, (1) by linking them with the resources and expertise of Washington's universities, and (2) providing up to $200,000 in funding per research project. Though WTC is located in Seattle, its focus is statewide. Since 1993, the WTC has partnered with 18 Spokane companies, investing over $1 million in product R&D.;

    A few examples of Spokane companies that have received funding from WTC include:

    -- Argo Technical Publishing has teamed with Steve Simmons of Eastern Washington University's Computer Science Dept. to develop a voice-activated computer system that provides instant access to complex information upon command.
    -- Packet Engines teamed with Jonathon Liu of Washington State University's Electrical Engineering Dept. to devise methods to increase performance for broadband gigabit networks.
    -- New Light Industries worked with Jerry Parker of EWU's Chemistry Dept. to further the development of New Light's hologram technology.

    Spokane Bat Manufacturer Hits the Sweet Spot with National Retailer
    Brett Brothers Bats, a small Spokane start-up, recently landed an agreement with Big 5 Sporting Goods to carry their innovative wood laminated baseball bats in stores throughout the western U.S. The company owes much of their success to a research partnership with the Washington State University Wood Materials and Engineering Lab (WMEL) and funding by Washington Technology Center.

    Brett Brothers was incorporated in 1997 with one mission -- to create a new generation of wood baseball bats. These bats would be more durable, with less breakage than traditional wood bats. Best of all, these new laminated bats would bring the cost of replacing bats down enough so that schools, little leagues, and collegiate leagues could get back to playing the game the way it was meant to be played.

    Washington Technology Center (WTC) contributed $110,000 toward a joint-research project between WSU's Wood Materials Engineering Laboratory (WMEL) and Brett Bros. Bats to conduct stress testing and analysis of the bats.

    The research led to improvements in the design and manufacturing of the bats. WSU's involvement also lent creditability to the company's product claims. Brett Bros. refers to their partnership with WSU WMEL in their marketing materials, saying the bat has been "scientifically proven to be 20% more durable than conventional wood bats".

    Business is growing and promises to really take off due to some recent developments. The NCAA has changed the specifications for baseball bats used by NCAA member schools such that metal bats will have to perform like wood bats. This ruling, which will go into effect January 1, 2000, requires that bat manufacturers submit their bats for certification. Brett Bros. has already been approved by the NCAA, and expects demand for their competitively priced, more durable bats to rise sharply. Brett Bros. bats have also been approved by the Major League Baseball Association for rookie league play and for practice in the major leagues. Sales have already gone up from 4,000 bats in 1997 to more than 25,000 in 1999. The company anticipates producing more than 100,000 bats in the year 2000 to meet the demand.

    According to Emanuele Portolease, vice-president of Brett Bros., "We wouldn't be here today if it weren't for WSU and Washington Technology Center."

    WTC-Sponsored Projects Bring Results
    WTC recently completed a survey of 148 companies who participated on projects during the period of July 1, 1995-June 30, 1999 to determine the impact WTC projects have had on their bottom line. The companies forecast that their WTC projects will lead to the creation of more than 1500 new jobs and generate $196 million in sales over the next five years. WTC currently partners with approximately 40 companies per year, and has plans to increase that number over the next few years. Small companies in particular benefit from the interaction with WTC. Nearly 60 percent of companies that participate on WTC projects have fewer than 10 employees.

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    WTC awards funding in first fall RTD program

    Washington Technology Center awarded $450,000 to six company-university research teams in December 1999 under the Research & Technology Development program (RTD). The projects were evenly split between the University of Washington and Washington State University, with nearly 60 percent of the funding going to projects at WSU. A summary of these projects is featured below.

    This is the first round of awards made since WTC started offering the RTD program semiannually. Project funding will now be awarded in June and December every year. "We made this change to be more responsive to the needs of companies that don't qualify for our FTI / EA programs," says Lee Cheatham, WTC's executive director. "This includes companies with over 100 employees and / or companies that need more than $30K for research. In the past, companies would have to wait up to a year to apply for funding. Many companies can't wait that long, particularly when they're in a competitive market."

    Awards in Microelectronics

    StressWave, Inc., Kent
    Researcher: Brian Flinn, UW Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
    Over 60% of aircraft component failures are caused by metal fatigue problems, particularly cracking around drilled fastener holes in the fuselage. Aircraft are particularly sensitive to fatigue because of their thin, highly stressed structures. Current manufacturing methods to prevent in-service fatigue damage are both labor and tooling intensive and are not amenable to automation. WTC funded an earlier FTI project wherein StressWave, working with UW researcher Brian Flinn, optimized a new automated process using company-developed equipment that makes the holes more resistant to fatigue. The focus of this 18-month RTD project will be to generate the data needed to commercialize the StressWave process for the full range of metal alloys used in aircraft manufacturing.

    Spectra Lux Corporation, Kirkland
    Researcher: Mark Kuzyk, WSU Dept. of Physics
    Spectra Lux Corporation is a manufacturer of aircraft lightplates and lighted cockpit keyboards. Mark Kuzyk, of the WSU Physics Dept., will conduct research to reduce the amount of energy required to illuminate a given area, making the company's products more efficient and less expensive to manufacture. The scope of the two-year project includes the development of a prototype and transfer of the manufacturing process to Spectra Lux. In addition to becoming more competitive in existing markets, the company plans to expand into untapped markets that use illuminated displays such as the automobile, industrial, and medical equipment industries.

    Awards in Advanced Materials / Manufacturing

    D & A Instrument Company, Port Townsend
    Researcher: Thanos Papanicolaou, WSU Dept. of Civil Engineering
    D & A Instrument is currently developing an instrument that can monitor the movement of gravel in streambeds. That's good news for salmon, which require gravel for spawning, and for state and local governments, that are largely responsible for preserving or restoring salmon habitat under the Endangered Species Act.

    The technology, called the Gravel Transport Sensor (GTS), is an acoustic device that detects and counts gravel particles moving downstream as they impact a steel pipe (recorded as number of "pings"). Thano Papanicolaou, of WSU's Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, is working with D&A; to develop and test algorithms to calculate the rate of flow of gravel based on the collected data. These algorithms will serve as the basis for embedded software in the product. Currently the monitoring of gravel movement is highly labor intensive, requiring individuals to physically go into the streams and collect samples of gravel. Decision makers in several government agencies have already expressed an interest in the product, according to John Downing, President of D & A. These include the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington State Dept. of Ecology, and state and federal highway departments. GTS can also be used to monitor the movement of gravel as a result of logging and increased urbanization, and to determine the effect of scour on bridge supports in gravel bed streams.

    Aculight, Bothell
    Researcher: Ann Mescher, UW Mechanical Engineering Dept.
    Aculight designs, develops, and manufactures solid-state lasers for new applications in industries as diverse as medicine, semiconductor processing, and telecommunications. As solid-state lasers get smaller and power output increases, cooling the laser becomes a significant challenge. In collaboration with Ann Mescher of UW's Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Aculight is investigating MEMS processes at WTC's Microfab Lab to achieve a novel thermal management system that efficiently removes high heat flux from the laser's package. Aculight, one of the top 100 fastest growing private companies in Washington, forecasts overall sales in excess of $20 million by 2004.

    Awards in Biotechnology / Biomedical Devices

    Barlean's Organic Oils, Ferndale
    Researcher: Norman Lewis, WSU Institute of Biological Chemistry
    Numerous scientific studies suggest that there is a connection between cultures that ingest a diet high in plant lignans (phyto-estrogens) and a lower incidence of estrogen-related cancers including breast, colon and prostate cancers. Flaxseed and flaxseed meal contain high levels of plant lignans, and have been marketed as health food products for many years.

    Barlean's Organic Oils, a leading U.S. manufacturer of health food supplements, has teamed with WSU's Institute of Biological Chemistry to commercialize a proprietary method of extracting plant lignans from flaxseed with a consistent, high level of potency. The company intends to market the resulting product as a nutriceutical.

    Micronics, Inc., Redmond
    Researcher: Paul Yager, UW Dept. of Bioengineering
    Paul Yager, UW Dept. of Bioengineering, is assisting Micronics in the development of an inexpensive disposable microfluidic cartridge. The cartridge, about the size of a credit card, is used to perform blood tests and other diagnostics requiring body fluids. The microfluidic system provides results at the "point of care", such as in the doctor's office, instead of being sent to a laboratory. Just one of these "lab-on-chip" devices can potentially perform up to 20 different medical diagnostic tests using the same sample. The microfluidic technologies behind these advances were originally developed at the University of Washington using the same microfabrication techniques established in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. The research team is using WTC's Microfabrication Lab to create the prototype and optimize MEMS-based manufacturing methods.

    Related WTC links:

  • RTD Grant Program

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  • From saving salmon to advances in aircraft manufacturing -- six Wash. companies receive funding from WTC for product development

    For Immediate Release: December 14, 1999

    Seattle - Washington Technology Center (WTC) has awarded $488,000 to six Washington-based companies teamed with university researchers through WTC's Research and Technology Development Program (RTD). The RTD program matches companies with university researchers to conduct product research & development on behalf of the company. The ultimate goal is to help the company grow and create jobs for the people of Washington state. This round, the projects range from developing a device that measures the movement of gravel in streambeds, to projects that will lower manufacturing costs and improve safety of aircraft, to the optimization of new point-of-care diagnostic equipment.

    Projects were split evenly between Washington State University and the University of Washington. However, WSU received the lion's share of funding with a total of $260,000.

    The Research and Technology Development Program awards between $1–2 million per year to industry/university research collaborations that have commercial potential. The WTC has a call for proposals for the RTD program every six months.

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    Startup turns wood waste into wood preservative

    The timber products industry in Western Washington has generated massive amounts of waste cedar wood that are too hazardous for landfill disposal. Currently more than 100,000 tons of the highly flammable by-product are sitting in waste piles in Grays Harbor County alone. Northwest Quality Products, Aberdeen, has a plan and a process for extracting two viable products from this waste -- a wood-oil preservative and aromatic oils that impart the cedar scent to consumer products such as candles and soap.

    Ron Lunnum, founder of the company, wanted to optimize the distillation method for production on a larger scale. Washington Technology Center introduced him to John Gerdes, a researcher with expertise in organic chemistry at Central Washington University in Ellensburg. The two are collaborating on an Entrepreneur's Access project to further develop the refining process. Upon completion, Northwest Quality Products plans to operate a processing plant in Grays Harbor County and employ up to 50 workers in this economically depressed region.

    Related WTC links:

  • Northwest Quality Products is a WTC client
  • RTD Grant Program

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  • Move over mouse -- make room for Dot

    Imagine being able to move the cursor on your computer screen by turning your head or pointing your finger instead of using a mouse. Everyday computer tasks such as word processing and spreadsheets would become easier by not having to switch from the keyboard to the mouse. New applications would be possible once the user isn't tethered to the computer via a mouse or joystick.

    Dot On, Inc., Issaquah, has developed a new cursor control device called the "Dot Tracker". This prototype system uses a sensor, connected to the computer, that optically tracks the position of a small dot affixed to an object such as a wireless-pointing device or directly to the head or finger of the user. The movement of the dot directs the position of the cursor on the screen. Potential markets for "Dot Tracker" include business applications, PC games, children's programs, and applications for the disabled.

    Using specialized equipment at UW's Human Interface Technology Laboratory, Suzanne Weghorst is performing an analysis of head movements exhibited by average computer users during desktop applications. The results of this Entrepreneur's Access project will determine the precise refractive optics required for the head or eyewear mounted version of the product.

    Related WTC links:

  • RTD Grant Program

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  • WTC awards 1999 research and technology development projects

    Washington's technology-based companies are getting a boost in their R&D;, thanks to the technical assistance and funding provided by Washington Technology Center (WTC). In July 1999, WTC awarded over $1.4 million in R&D; funding to 14 company / university research teams through its Research & Technology Development (RTD) Program. The RTD program is one of three WTC funding mechanisms that helps companies develop, refine, or test new products using the expertise of research at the state's universites.

    This year's round of projects aims to make advances in areas as diverse as bloodless surgery, patented nutraceuticals, and rocket science. A summary of these collaborations is featured below.

    Company partners have projected product revenues generated by these projects to exceed $300 million by 2002, and that more than 400 high tech jobs will created by 2004.

    Effective in 1999, the RTD program will be offered twice per year. Proposals are beings solicited now for the next round of RTD projects which will be awarded in December 1999.

    Awards in Biotechnology / Biomedical Devices

    EKOS Corporation, Bothell
    Researcher: Lawrence Crum, UW Applied Physics Lab
    EKOS is a medical device company founded in 1995 to commercialize ultrasound technology for therapeutic use. The company's first product is an ultrasound-tipped catheter that could accelerate the effectiveness of blood clot dissolving drugs. The focus of this project will be to determine the physical characteristics of microbubbles that enhance the ultrasound mediated dissolution of blood clots.

    MCD Technologies, Inc., Tacoma
    Researcher: Juming Tang, WSU Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering
    MCD Technologies manufactures novel food drying systems based on its patented Refractance Window(tm) technology which can dry food products such as fruits, vegetables and herbs in a few minutes as opposed to several hours for conventional food drying methods, and with better food quality. The focus of this project will be to study application methods to optimize the Refractance Window(tm) drying systems with a wider variety of foods.

    Decagon Devices, Inc., Pullman
    Researcher: Dr. Markus Flury, WSU Dept. of Crop & Soil Sciences
    Decagon Devices, Inc., manufactures and markets instruments for food quality testing and environmental research. Their current customer list is 80% of the top 100 food companies in the U.S. This research project will further develop a prototype instrument that measures the freezing characteristics of hydrated foods, soils, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics.

    Applied Phytologics, Inc., Pullman
    Researcher: Diter von Wettstein, WSU Dept. of Crop & Soil Sciences
    Applied Phytologics is a plant-based life science company. Using plant genetics technology, the researcher and company will develop a new strain of barley grain to be grown in Washington state that can be used as chicken feed for broiler chickens. Currently, Washington imports corn as the primary source of feed at significant cost; yet barley is among the top ten agricultural commodities grown in the state. If successful, this project will benefit both barley farmers and chicken growers in Washington.

    Söliv, Seattle
    Researcher: Robert Waaland, UW Dept. of Botany
    Söliv, a Seattle start-up, has discovered and created a new, high value skin care product from seaweed indigenous to the Puget Sound region. The project proposes to adapt and improve intensive cultivation methods developed at the UW in order to grow this marine plant on a commercial scale. The seaweed will be used as an ingredient in skin care products to be marketed to spas as a nutraceutical.

    Therus Corporation, Seattle
    Researcher: Peter Kaczkowski, UW Applied Physics Lab
    Using UW technology, Therus Corporation aims to further the development of a hand-held surgical wand that uses high-intensity ultrasound (HIFU) to stop internal bleeding and to selectively kill abnormal tissue within the body without having to make an incision. The "TheraStat" device delivers ultrasound to a targeted site within the body at a level of 1,000 times higher than that used for diagnostic purposes. Initial uses for the surgical instrument include stopping bleeding caused by trauma or injuries, and for controlling bleeding during surgery.

    Saigene Corporation, Redmond
    Researcher: Bruce Darling, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
    Saigene is a biotech start-up specializing in DNA probe based diagnostics. This research project proposes to generate a food and water pathogen detection procedure that can test for disease causing bacteria in less than one hour. Current methods for testing foods can take up to 7 days, requiring that fresh foods be held during this process, thereby diminishing the freshness of the final delivered product.

    Awards in Computer Systems

    Argo Technical Publishing, Inc., Spokane
    Researcher: Steven Simmons, EWU Dept. of Computer Science
    Argo Technical Publishing has been publishing technical documentation and distance learning courseware in electronic formats since 1993. This project will produce a new software utility that adds two-way voice interaction to their multi-media CD-ROM products, to be used for training, documentation and reference in industrial environments. An example of how this system could be used would be to transmit images & instruction to an emergency response team member on the correct response for an acid spill while en route to a tank truck accident.

    IST-Quadtek, Inc., Redmond
    Researcher: Jeng-Neng Hwang, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
    IST-Quadtek offers a unique video camera / pyrometer (thermometer) system for monitoring conditions inside hot environments such as industrial furnaces. This project will develop an advanced real-time image enhancement PC board to enhance the image quality for their product that provides video monitoring of cement kiln processes. The challenge is to present clear pictures of dirty environments - where current video imaging systems fail.

    Awards in Advanced Materials & Manufacturing

    Hovair Systems, Inc., Seattle
    Researcher: Brian Fabien, UW Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
    Hovair Systems designs and manufactures material transport systems, primarily for heavy industrial applications. The new WTC project will address the structural, vibration and electronic controller issues required to reduce the cycle time for the Hovair Lift & Carry Tower Systems for automobile assembly-line use.

    Mikron Industries, Inc., Kent
    Researcher: Vipin Kumar, UW Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
    Mikron supplies extruded plastic profiles for use by the vinyl window and door industry. The project will implement a novel microcellular plastic processing technique developed at the UW to reduce polyvinyl chloride material consumption, while increasing the insulating properties and structural strength of the company's products.

    Radiant Optics, Inc., Woodinville
    Researcher: Thomas Stoebe, UW Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
    Radiant Optics manufactures a unique and highly efficient heater which delivers focused heat within a designated area. This project will design a ceramic heating element to replace a more conventional metal element to increase reliability and efficiency of the spot heater.

    Related WTC links:

  • RTD Grant Program

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  • WTC awards 1998 research and technology development grants

    For Immediate Release: August 7, 1998

    Seattle - Washington Technology Center (WTC) recently awarded more than $1 million in R&D; grant funding to 13 Washington high tech companies teamed with state university researchers. The successful projects were selected from a pool of 40 proposals, and will be administered through WTC's Research and Technology Development (RTD) grant program. The goal of the RTD program is to provide research funding to industry/university research collaborations to develop commercially promising technology that will create jobs in Washington. The companies are located on both sides of the Cascades with funding almost evenly divided between researchers at Washington State University and the University of Washington.

    The projects are awarded in four technology areas: Microelectronics, Advanced Materials and Manufacturing, Biotech/Biomedical Instruments, and Computer Systems. A sampling of projects includes:

    Bloodless Surgery Becoming a Reality: Develop a prototype of a hand-held high intensity focused ultrasound device which can be used to stop internal bleeding in a non-invasive manner. Initial applications for this product include prevention of bleeding during liver surgery, and catheter wound closure following angioplasty, angiography and stent placement.

    Boeing Receives Grant for Flywheel Energy Storage System: Boeing Information, Space & Defense Systems has been working to develop a flywheel storage system that can be used by the electric power industry. The WTC project will focus on growing high temperature superconducting crystals for use as a frictionless magnetic bearing in the flywheel.

    Developments in the Fight Against Clotting Disorders: Study the efficiency of using ultrasound, in conjunction with existing drugs, to dissolve blood clots.

    WTC, a state funded agency that connects Washington companies with state university researchers and research funding, places emphasis on technology projects that will produce viable new products or enhance existing ones. The successful companies must demonstrate that they possess the capability to bring these products to market, and that enough demand exists to stimulate growth of the company, thereby creating more jobs for the people of Washington state.

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    Eastside high-tech companies receive state R&D; funding

    For Immediate Release: July 12, 1998

    Seattle - Washington Technology Center (WTC) recently awarded more than $375,000 in R&D; grant funding to six Eastside high tech companies teamed with university researchers. The six projects were among a total of 13 awarded statewide and will be administered through the WTC's Research and Technology Development (RTD) grant program. The goal of the RTD program is to provide research funding to industry/university research collaborations to develop commercially promising technology that will create jobs in Washington.

    The six companies are concentrated in two technology areas -- microelectronics and biotech/biomedical instruments. The eastside companies are:

    Microeletronics Category

    Micro Encoder, Inc. of Kirkland
    HyperLynx of Redmond
    Paroscientific, Inc. of Redmond

    Biotechnology/Biomedical Instruments

    EKOS Corporation of Bothell
    Vanson, Inc., of Redmond
    Therus Corporation of Redmond

    WTC, a state-funded agency that connects Washington companies with state university researchers and research funding, places emphasis on technology projects that will produce viable new products or enhance existing ones. The successful companies must demonstrate that they possess the capability to bring these products to market, and that enough demand exists to stimulate growth of the company, thereby creating more jobs for the people of Washington state.

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