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3TIER, UW and WSU are part of $178M smart grid project

3TIER, a Seattle-based provider of renewable energy assessment and power forecasting services, and the University of Washington and Washington State University are among 12 Northwest utilities and several companies taking part in a smart grid demonstration project which received $89 million in stimulus funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project, led by Battelle Memorial Institute in Richland, Wash., spans five states and will involve 60,000 consumers in a project that will validate new technologies and approaches for energy efficiency. Of the approximately $178 million total project cost, half will be cost-shared by the participants.

Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project
    Battelle - Richland, Wash.
  • DOE Selects the Northwest and 3TIER for $178M Smart Grid Demo
    3TIER press release - Seattle - November 24, 2009
  • Secretary Chu Announces $620 Million for Smart Grid Demonstration and Energy Storage Projects
  • Pacific Northwest to host smart grid demo
    Sustainable Industries - San Francisco - December 3, 2009
  • Pacific Northwest emerges as power player in ‘smart-grid’ sweepstakes
    Puget Sound Business Journal - Seattle - December 4, 2009

    Related WTC links:

  • 3TIER is a WTC client
  • 3TIER cuts staff due to uncertainty in the renewable energy market
    Posted 10/09/2009
  • 3TIER opens offices in Germany, Australia and India
    Posted 4/06/2009
  • Washington's clean tech companies -- a list from Xconomy
    Posted 3/03/2009
  • 3TIER launches global wind prospecting tool
    Posted 2/06/2009
  • 3TIER receives $10M in venture funding
    Posted 12/18/2008

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    UW to gain nation's first facility dedicated to molecular engineering

    University of Washington leaders broke ground Oct. 9, 2009 on the site of what will be the nation's first facility dedicated to molecular engineering. The $78 million UW molecular engineering building will consist of a 28,000-square-foot basement laboratory designed to protect against vibrations and electromagnetic interference. The lab will be the largest facility of its type on the West Coast.

    "Molecular engineering is going to be right in the middle of a lot of the big societal problems -- energy, health care, communications," said Matthew O'Donnell, Frank & Julie Jungers Dean of the College of Engineering. "I think it's going to be as central to new technologies in this century as mechanical, electrical, chemical and materials engineering were to technologies developed in the last century."

    The molecular engineering building will be ready for occupancy in 2012.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • UW breaks ground on nation's largest molecular engineering building
    University of Washington News - Seattle - October 9, 2009

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    UW collaboration with Artemisia BioMedical receives $1.5M from Life Sciences Discovery Fund

    University of Washington, in collaboration with Artemisia BioMedical, Inc. has won a $1.5 million award from the Life Sciences Discovery Fund to advance the development of a novel cancer-treatment technology. A UW research team under the leadership of Tomikazu Sasaki, Ph.D., will work with Artemisia BioMedical to further advance their project entitled "Development of Artemisinin Compounds for Cancer Treatment." Artemisia BioMedical, a privately-held biotechnology company based in Newcastle, Washington, and the UW team received WTC support in 2007 for this technology which holds promise as a breakthrough for the treatment of many types of human cancer.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Press release from Artemisia BioMedical, Inc
  • Press release from Life Sciences Discovery Fund

    Related WTC links:

  • Artemisia BioMedical, Inc. is a WTC client

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    MicroGREEN Polymers business evolution profiled

    John Cook's Venture Blog takes a look at the business evolution of University of Washington spinout MicroGREEN Polymers, an Arlington-based developer of environmentally friendly recycled plastic products. MicroGREEN, which was founded by a pair of UW graduate students, received exclusive rights to UW patented technology and has since developed new technologies including intellectual property made possible through four state-funded research awards totaling more than $300,000 from Washington Technology Center.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • A UW spinout success story: Krishna Nadella of Microgreen
    TechFlash - Seattle, WA - August 20, 2009

    Related WTC links:

  • MicroGREEN Polymers is a WTC client
  • MicroGREEN Polymers raises $1.6M in ongoing investment round
    Posted 7/10/2009
  • MicroGREEN Gives Gift to University of Washington
    Posted 4/02/2008

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    Linden Rhoads focusing UW TechTransfer on startups

    University of Washington Vice Provost Linden Rhoads has been at the helm of UW TechTransfer for a year now, with a focus on helping startups commercialize technology. Rhoads, who also serves as a WTC board director, is profiled in a TechFlash article that also highlights the challenges and opportunities facing TechTransfer.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Startup vet Rhoads hits one-year mark at UW TechTransfer
    TechFlash - Seattle, WA - August 21, 2009

    Related WTC links:

  • Entrepreneur advises slower path to technology transfer
    Posted 4/16/2009
  • UW TechTransfer bringing entrepreneurs to UW campus
    Posted 3/31/2009

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    UW honors Hauck, Gupta, and NanoTech User Facility with 2009 Community of Innovators Awards

    University of Washington researchers Scott Hauck and Maya Gupta, and the NanoTech User Facility team of Scott Braswell, Xiaoxia Gao, Paul Wallace, and Qiuming Yu have been honored by the UW College of Engineering with 2009 Community of Innovators Awards. The Community of Innovators Awards acknowledge the extraordinary efforts of the college’s teaching and research assistants, staff, and faculty members.

    Scott Hauck, of the UW Department of Electrical Engineering, received the award for Faculty Innovator: Teaching and Learning for his outstanding contributions to improving engineering education.

    Maya Gupta, also of the UW Department of Electrical Engineering, was honored in the category of Faculty Innovator: Junior for exemplifying excellence in research and/or education.

    The NanoTech User Facility team of Scott Braswell, Xiaoxia Gao, Paul Wallace, and Qiuming Yu were honored with the team innovator award for a superior, sustained effort that has contributed significantly to the mission of the college.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • UW Engineering - Community of Innovators Awards
  • UW NanoTech User Facility

    Related WTC links:

  • Scott Hauck is a research partner with WTC client Impulse Accelerated Technologies
  • Maya Gupta is a research partner with WTC client CHROMiX

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    President Obama honors UW's Michael Hochberg and other outstanding Washington early-career scientists

    President Obama announced the 100 winners of the 2009 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on early-career researchers.

    According to the press release, "Nine Federal departments and agencies join together annually to nominate the most meritorious young scientists and engineers-researchers whose early accomplishments show the greatest promise for strengthening America’s leadership in science and technology and contributing to the awarding agencies' missions."

    Winning researchers receive up to a $1 million five-year grant to further their work.

    There are five awardees from the state of Washington:
    -Michael J. Hochberg, University of Washington - nominated by Department of Defense.
    -Alexandre M. Tartakovsky, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - nominated by Department of Energy.
    -Benjamin E. Smith, University of Washington - nominated by NASA.
    -Ulrike Peters, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center - nominated by National Institutes of Health.
    -Harmit S. Malik, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center - nominated by National Science Foundation.

    According to Photonics.com, "Michael Hochberg, assistant professor of photonics at the University of Washington in Seattle, will use his award to advance his research into using silicon photonics as a way to build optical devices and as a way to explore new physical phenomena." Hochberg played an instrumental role in acquiring a $2.5 million electron beam lithography tool to be housed, and available to companies and researchers, in the WTC Microfabrication Laboratory.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • President honors outstanding early-career scientists
    The White House - Washington, D.C. - July 9, 2009
  • PECASE Funds Photonics Work
    Photonics.com - Pittsfield, Mass. - July 13, 2009

    Related WTC links:

  • Multimillion-dollar nano tool coming to WTC Lab
    Posted 10/01/2008

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    Modumetal, UW Partnership Receives Funding for Anti-Corrosion Technology

    Modumetal to develop an innovative commercial anti-corrosion technology in partnership with University of Washington's Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

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    SEATTLE – May 20, 2009 – Washington Technology Center (WTC) has awarded an Entrepreneur's Access grant to the University of Washington to support an advanced material research collaboration with Modumetal, Inc. of Seattle, Washington.

    Modumetal, Inc., a Seattle-based developer of nanostructured materials, is collaborating with the University of Washington's Department of Materials Science and Engineering on a project titled "Functionally-Graded Preceramic Polymer Coating for Corrosion Resistant Commercial Sulfuric Acid Pipelines."

    "We are excited about this opportunity to partner with the exceptional researchers at the University of Washington to create this cutting-edge material for new commercial anti-corrosion application," says Leslie Warren, Modumetal's Project Manager and senior engineer in this effort. Christina Lomasney, the company's CEO confirms that "with support from partners like the WTC and University of Washington, Modumetal is poised to create a new technology that will have broad industrial application and will result in new jobs and economic growth in our region."

    Sulfuric acid is a highly corrosive substance used extensively in industrial processes. Typical anti-corrosion coatings have a weakness – if breached, they leave the metal surface underneath the coating vulnerable to acid attack. Modumetal has a unique production method that eliminates this surface weakness by allowing anti-corrosion materials to be functionally combined with metal.

    With this project, the team of Modumetal and UW Professor Rajendra Bordia, Ph.D., plans to modify a preceramic polymer system developed at the University to merge with a functionally graded materials system developed by Modumetal for corrosion protection of commercial sulfuric acid production pipelines for ConocoPhillips.

    "This project combines the research that has been done at the University of Washington and at Modumetal to develop a novel solution for a significant problem in the area of corrosion," said Dr. Bordia. "The short term EA funding from WTC gives us a chance to initiate this joint development and prepares us for long term collaboration with Modumetal. The need for corrosion resistant coatings is widespread and the proposed solution that we will be exploring with Modumetal has the potential to impact a broad range of industries."

    Modumetal expects that successful application of this technology will lead to many opportunities in the $300 million corrosion-prevention market.

    The $5,000 award for this project comes from an Entrepreneur's Access grant from Washington Technology Center (WTC). WTC competitively awards around $1 million in state funding annually for research and technology development projects. State funding enables collaboration between companies and non-profit research institutions on technology projects that show strong potential for commercializing products and creating jobs. Since 1996, the state has funded 330 research and technology development projects.

    "This grant is a great example of state government at its best," said Washington State Representative Jamie Pedersen (D-Seattle). "The seed money from WTC, combined with world-class research facilities at the University of Washington and the innovative entrepreneurs at Modumetal, will create jobs and help the state maintain its lead in technology."

    More information about the research and technology development program is available online at http://www.watechcenter.org/rtd.

    About Modumetal, Inc.
    Modumetal (www.modumetal.com) was co-founded in 2006 in Seattle, WA to realize the commercial potential of a unique class of advanced materials. Modumetal is creating revolutionary nanolaminated and functionally-graded materials that will change design and manufacturing forever by dramatically improving the structural, corrosion and high temperature performance of coatings, bulk materials and parts. Modumetal represents a whole new way of producing parts and is leveraging nanotechnology to achieve this unprecedented performance. Modumetal is made by a "green" electrochemical manufacturing approach, which reduces the carbon footprint of conventional metals manufacturing at the same time that it redefines materials performance.

    About Washington Technology Center
    Washington Technology Center is a statewide economic development organization focused on technology and innovation. We spark ideas, form connections between people and resources, and foster job growth to position Washington state as a national technology leader. As an organization, Washington Technology Center channels state, federal, and private resources to help companies develop and commercialize new products and technologies. Our 15,000-square-foot Microfabrication Laboratory provides companies and university researchers access to facilities and specialized equipment for micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) research and product/process development. The impact of Washington Technology Center's work has generated more than $600 million in additional investment for Washington companies and researchers. For more information how Washington Technology Center can help research and development projects succeed, visit www.watechcenter.org or call 206-685-1920.

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    Related WTC links:

  • Modumetal is a WTC client

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    UW IGERT Nanotechnology Conference - June 10-12, 2009

    The Center for Nanotechnology at the University of Washington will be holding its annual IGERT Nanotechnology Conference jointly with Japan’s National Institute for Material Science (NIMS) on June 10th, 11th and 12th at the UW Tower. The themes for this year’s conference are photonics, energy and bio-nanotechnology.

    The three day event will consist of plenary sessions, poster session and reception and facility tours of the Center for Nanotechnology. Featured speakers include George Whitesides from Harvard University, James Gimzewski from UCLA, and Bryon Gates from Simon Fraser University.

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    IGERT Nanotechnology Conference

    Frontiers in Nanotechnology

    Date(s): June 10, 2009 (Wednesday) to June 12, 2009 (Friday)
    Time: 8:30 AM to 12:00 PM
    Location: UW Tower Seattle, WA
    URL: http://depts.washington.edu/ntuf/outreach/workshop09.php

    A list of invited speakers and tentative schedule can be found on the event Web site while planning is being finished. Registration is FREE, but seating is limited to 200 people. Please registrar using the link above to attend this event.

    RSVP: No fee to attend, but seating is limited.

    Contact: Mack Carter
    206.616.9320
    mcarter@U.WASHINGTON.EDU

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    Entrepreneur advises slower path to technology transfer

    Joe Eichinger, co-founder and president of medical-device company CoAptus Medical Corp in Redmond, advises university researchers to fully form their intellectual property before pursuing commercialization, he says in an interview with Xconomy. Eichinger is providing early-stage business advice to University of Washington researchers as part of UW TechTransfer's LaunchPad Entrepreneur Advisers program. Eichinger, a start-up veteran and co-founder of WTC-funded EKOS Corporation, cautions would-be entrepreneurs to flesh out several potential applications of their technology to avoid prematurely locking in on the first 'good' business idea.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Putting UW Startup Dreams on Hold: Entrepreneur Advises Researchers to Nurture Ideas More
    Xconomy - Seattle, WA - April 7, 2009

    Related WTC links:

  • UW TechTransfer bringing entrepreneurs to UW campus

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    VentriPoint raises $1 million in debenture financing

    VentriPoint Diagnostics Ltd., a Seattle-based provider of diagnostic tools to monitor patients with heart disease, announced it raised total proceeds of $1,052,317 in debenture financing. Health Canada has granted licensed approval for VentriPoint's diagnostic tool which is based upon technology received by VentriPoint through its exclusive technology license with the University of Washington. The diagnostic tool, together with its associated online service, is being developed for a variety of heart related diseases, including congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more in the VentriPoint press release

    Related WTC links:

  • VentriPoint is a WTC client

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    UW TechTransfer bringing entrepreneurs to UW campus

    UW TechTransfer has introduced two programs to support researchers looking to start companies or to commercialize their technologies. The Entrepreneurs-in-Residence program is aimed at entrepreneurs who are looking for commercializable ideas from the University. The LaunchPad Entrepreneur Advisers program creates a pool of business people available to mentor UW researchers about starting a company.

    "This is part of building an innovation ecosystem for the state of Washington," said Janis Machala, director of LaunchPad Services, a division of UW TechTransfer that helps create UW startups.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more in University Week

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    UW’s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship hosts Springboard - March 2, 2009

    Are you a small company looking for BIG talent?

    On March 2, 2009 the University of Washington’s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship will host Springboard, an annual networking event designed to bring the founders/CEOs of Puget Sound’s dynamic early-stage companies together with entrepreneurially-minded students from the University of Washington.

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    Date(s): March 2, 2009 (Monday)
    Time: 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
    Location: Balmer Commons on Seattle UW campus
    URL: http://www.foster.washington.edu/centers/cie/Pages/Springboard.aspx
    Description:

    How can early-stage companies to attract young talent out of the University? We know you’re looking for people who are the right fit, have the same entrepreneurial drive and determination to succeed that you have, and possess a skill set that enables them to do whatever needs doing. Springboard gives you a chance to recruit for just those people at the University of Washington.

    Who are the students? They are undergraduates, MBAs, non-business graduate students who have taken the entrepreneurship core curriculum, law students, etc., who know their careers will be entrepreneurial. And they’re looking for an opportunity within a dynamic, quick-paced environment. Students start thinking about their summer internships and job possibilities in early spring, so our timing is perfect!

    Springboard will be limited to 45 early-stage/rapid-growth companies, so we ask that you register to attend as soon as possible. The fee per company to participate is $35.

    How will this work? Just complete registration through Brown Paper Tickets with the link below. You only need to purchase one registration or “ticket” for your company, regardless of how many colleagues you bring to the event. Once your company is registered, you’ll receive confirmation from CIE with event logistics. We will provide each company with access to the resumes of students attending Springboard a week before the event, giving you time to look through them and earmark those most qualified for your upcoming positions or internships.

    Contact: Whitney Lackey
    206.616.3691
    wlackey@u.washington.edu


    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Register here

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    VisionGate and University of Washington create 3-D cancer imaging

    VisionGate, Inc., a privately-held company in Gig Harbor, Wash., and University of Washington researchers led by Eric Seibel, a UW mechanical engineering associate professor, have helped develop a new kind of microscope to visualize cells in three dimensions, technology that could help advance early cancer detection. According to a University of Washington press release, the machine works by rotating the cell under the microscope lens and taking hundreds of pictures per rotation, and then digitally combining them to form a single 3-D image. Funding was provided by VisionGate and Washington Technology Center.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more in UWNews.org

    Related WTC links:

  • VisionGate is a WTC client

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    3TIER launches global wind prospecting tool

    3TIER, a Seattle-based provider of wind, solar and hydro energy assessment forecasting, announced expansion of its FirstLook® Prospecting tool, providing free access to average wind speed ranges throughout the world. “This intuitive and interactive tool provides a free, initial assessment of global wind resources,” says Kenneth Westrick, CEO and founder of 3TIER. “We developed this map as part of REmapping the World,™ a sophisticated renewable energy resource mapping initiative we launched in March 2008 to address the biggest barrier to global renewable energy adoption – the lack of information.”

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read the 3TIER press release
  • Navigate the map at http://firstlook.3tier.com
  • Learn more about wind forecasting and 3TIER at The Wall Street Journal

    Related WTC links:

  • 3TIER is a WTC client
  • 3TIER receives $10M in venture funding

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    Microvision demonstrates a preproduction pico projector at Macworld and CES

    Microvision's plug-and-play projector creates a large screen image from a miniature device that connects to the TV-out or VGA connector on portable devices such as mobile phones, portable media players and notebook computers.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • More at Broadcast Engineering
  • More at Microvision

    Related WTC links:

  • Microvision is a WTC client

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    Theo Chocolate, UW scientists to identify the best organic cocoa beans

    Xconomy's interview with Theo's chief operating officer and food scientist, Dr. Andy McShea, describes Theo's partnership with University of Washington to develop food quality-analysis technology.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • More in Xconomy

    Related WTC links:

  • Theo Chocolate is a WTC client

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    JEOL provides more details on first electron beam lithography machine in Northwest

    JEOL USA issued a press release giving more information on the Pacific Northwest's first-of-its-kind electron beam lithography tool. JEOL will install the tool to support nanoscience research when the University of Washington takes delivery of a JEOL JBX-6300FS e-beam system. The system will be installed in the state-funded Washington Technology Center Microfabrication Lab. Funding for the tool acquisition was provided through a state-supported STAR researchers’ grant to Michael Hochberg, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, and a matching grant from the Washington Research Foundation.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • More in the JEOL press release

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    Healionics raises $2.6 million

    Healionics Corporation, a start-up biomaterials company in Redmond, has raised $2.6 million in a second round of financing. Investors came from several angel funding networks -- the Bellingham Angels, the Alliance of Angels, Keiretsu, the Tacoma Angel Network and the Zino Society. The company is commercializing UW technology that will reduce infection from skin-breaching devices such as catheters.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more in the Seattle Times

    Related WTC links:

  • Healionics is a WTC client

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    UW's "bionic" contact lens named a best invention by TIME

    A prototype 'bionic' contact lens manufactured at WTC's Microfabrication Laboratory by Babak Parviz, a UW assistant professor of electrical engineering, has been named to TIME's Best Inventions of 2008.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more at TIME
  • Learn more about the technology at University of Washington News

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    Scientists develop new cancer-killing compound from salad plant

    Researchers at the University of Washington have updated a traditional Chinese medicine to create a compound that is more than 1,200 times more specific in killing certain kinds of cancer cells than currently available drugs, heralding the possibility of a more effective chemotherapy drug with minimal side effects. The compound is currently being licensed to Artemisia Biomedical Inc. for commercialization.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more in UW News

    Related WTC links:

  • Artemisia Biomedical is a WTC client

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  • Healionics announces first commercial product for biomaterial

    Healionics, a start-up company in Redmond, has entered into a multi-million dollar manufacturing, supply and distribution agreement for use of its biomaterial in a veterinary glaucoma implant made by TR BioSurgical. Healionics was founded on technology developed by Dr. Buddy Ratner and Dr. Andrew Marshall at the University of Washington Engineered Biomaterials center and licensed from UW.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more in Xconomy

    Related WTC links:

  • Healionics is a WTC client

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    UW licenses 'camera in a pill' technology

    In one of its largest technology transfer deals, University of Washington has licensed imaging technology to medical-device maker Hoya, which plans to commercialize the technology in the next couple of years. Research funding for the technology came from several sources including Washington Technology Center.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more in Puget Sound Business Journal

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  • UW nano research doubles efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells

    Using an innovative clumping approach to surface design, A UW team led by Guozhong Cao, a professor of materials science and engineering, doubled the efficiency of zinc oxide based dye-sensitized solar cells. The team plans to transfer the concept to titanium oxide.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more at UWNews.org

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  • Japan’s National Institute of Materials Science opens an office at UW

    The NIMS Overseas Operations Office is the first office outside of Japan established by a Japanese national laboratory. NIMS partnership with UW will facilitate collaboration with U.S. companies through the spin-off of research efforts.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more from the UW College of Engineering

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  • Prototype 'Bionic' Contact Lens Developed at WTC Lab

    Babak Parviz, a UW assistant professor of electrical engineering, heads a multi-disciplinary group developing virtual displays on contact lenses. The prototype contact lenses, with metal connectors for electronic circuits, were manufactured in WTC's Microfabrication Laboratory. "Looking through a completed lens, you would see what the display is generating superimposed on the world outside," said Parviz.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more at UWeek.org

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  • Illumigen Biosciences Acquired by Cubist Pharmaceuticals

    Illumigen Biosciences of Seattle, a spinoff company from the University of Washington Genome Center, was recently acquired by Cubist Pharmaceuticals of Lexington, Mass. Illumigen's prospective drug to treat Hepatitis C virus was the basis of the acquisition. Illumigen was formed in 2000 by faculty/staff from the Genome Center (housed in the Washington Technology Center facility).

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read the Cubist press release

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  • MicroGREEN Gives Gift to University of Washington

    The UW Dept. of Mechanical Engineering has just acquired a new Instrumented Impact Test machine from Instron, the first of its kind at UW. This has been made possible by major gifts from MicroGREEN Polymers and the Washington Research Foundation, and additional contributions from UW. "It is quite a special story about TechTransfer success, and a strong UW-industry (especially a Washington startup helped by WTC) relationship," said Vipin Kumar, Associate Professor, UW Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.

    Related WTC links:

  • MicroGREEN Polymers is a WTC client

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  • Life Sciences Discovery Fund selects six awardees in inaugural grant round

    UW researcher Daniel Chiu — a Washington Technology Center past award winner — is among the winning researchers proposing novel uses of technology to improve health care.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read the Life Sciences Discovery Fund press release

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  • UW iSchool Offers Programs in Information Management

    Guest Column
    In today's hyper-competitive and turbulent environments, the very essence of an organization is determined by how information is managed and leveraged. The Information School (iSchool) of the University of Washington continues to expand professional opportunities in the area of Information Management.

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    The iSchool already offers the Master of Science in Information Management (MSIM), both as a full-time option (Day MSIM) and as a part-time option (Executive MSIM) for working professionals. Recent developments for the iSchool include the establishment of the Institute for Innovation in Information Management, and summer courses in Knowledge Management and Information Architecture.

    In order to stay competitive, an organization must find novel ways to engage its information and knowledge resources through innovation in information management. The Institute for Innovation in Information Management (I3M) is chartered with the mission to be the premier research institute that will help organizations attain agility and competitive successes by managing their most vital assets—information and knowledge. The Institute undertakes research projects shaped by the interests of the research partners and expertise of I3M faculty associates. Discussion at the inaugural meeting of the Institute centered on the theme of Business Continuity, with a specific emphasis on discovering enablers and barriers to transfer of knowledge within communities of practice to support business strategy and drivers.

    The Institute sponsored a one-day symposium in April focused around "Knowledge Management in Turbulent Times." Parsons Brinckerhoff, one of the Institute's partners, presented research undertaken in this area in conjunction with the iSchool. The research examines characteristics of their Practice Area Networks to find indicators of success in moving knowledge across the organization to meet business objectives. The next I3M is set for October 11, 2006. For more information, visit http://depts.washington.edu/iiim/.

    The iSchool also has an upcoming course in Information Architecture.

    Information Architecture Summer Workshop
    September 11 - 15, 2006
    This five-day intensive "Information Architecture Summer Workshop covers the key elements of IA—understanding users’ information needs, building architectural frameworks to store information effectively, proper organizing and labeling of information for improved navigation and search, and perceiving opportunities where information architecture can increase business value. Each of these areas will be explored through lectures, interactive exercises and discussion led by University faculty and industry experts.

    Complete details and registration information is available at Info Architecture.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • I3M
  • Info Architecture

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  • UW Information School introduces new Masters of Science in Information Management Degree Program

    Sponsored Guest Article by UW iSchool

    A new full-time option for a master's degree in Information Management, geared toward traditional students interested in opening new career possibilities in information fields, is the most recent addition at the University of Washington's Information School (iSchool).

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    Launched in September 2005, the Day Master of Science in Information Management (Day MSIM) program is aimed at students interested in all aspects of information management, coming from almost any undergraduate degree program. The Executive MSIM option (started several years ago) is designed for working professionals who have prior experience in an information field. Executive MSIM classes are held Friday evenings and during the day on Saturdays, allowing students to bring their new-found knowledge immediately into the workplace.

    The Day MSIM program has the same core curriculum as the part-time Executive MSIM program, but requires additional credits for graduation.

    "Because the Executive program is targeted at working professionals with seven to ten years of experience, we assume those students have obtained knowledge from their working life and require fewer credits for graduation," explains MSIM program chair Michael Crandall. "The Day program offers more opportunity for students to build a broader knowledge base through electives and a required internship program."

    As program chair, Crandall's goal is to make MSIM the most sought-after program for information management. "I would hope that over the next few years, we will see our students becoming leaders in this field, both in practical settings and in the research arena, and pointing back to our program as a reason for their success," he says. "A strong internship program and research activities will bring us closer to the community."

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • Read more at UW Information School

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  • Premier nanotechnology center in the neighborhood

    The University of Washington has established a strong presence in nanotechnology. Since its inception in 1997, the Center for Nanotechnology has established a level of excellence in teaching, research, and public outreach.

    The Center's primary goal is the instruction and training of future scientists and educators. In April 2001, the UW and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory formed the Joint Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology to study an area of science that holds the promise to dramatically change the way we live in the new century.

    A centralized Nanotechnology User Facility (NUF) is located on the UW campus in Fluke Hall. The NUF is equipped with the start-of-the-art imaging tools for mapping nano-structures on the surface.

    The NUF is available to the UW community, other academic institutions, researchers, and industrial users as a cost center. NUF staff members will provide training and support regarding the use of the start-of-the-art tools. Users who successfully complete the training sections receive access to reserve the use of the instrumentation online.

    Related external links (will open a new window):

  • NanoTech User Facility at the UW

    Related WTC links:

  • Microfabrication Laboratory

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  • WTC awards 10 research and technology projects

    For Immediate Release: February 20, 2001

    Seattle - In December 2000, WTC awarded over $1.2 million in R&D; funding to 10 company / university research teams through its Research & Technology Development (RTD) program. The RTD program is one of three WTC funding mechanisms that helps companies develop, refine, or test new products using the scientific and engineering expertise of researchers at the state's universities.

    Between 1995 and 2000, companies and researchers participating in WTC projects were able to attract $167.25 million in follow-on investment from private and federal sources. This is an 11-times leverage of the state's $15.54 million investment in WTC.

    More than 50 percent of the current funding went to Washington State University's five projects, with four awards made to the University of Washington and one to Eastern Washington University.

    This cycle's round of projects is supporting advances in areas as diverse as electric power production, wireless communications, milk pasteurization, antioxidant research, and genome sequencing. A summary of these research collaborations is featured below.

    Awards in Advanced Materials & Manufacturing

    InnovaTek, Inc., Richland
    Researcher: Philip C. Malte, UW Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
    InnovaTek is an early-stage technology-based company that creates innovative solutions for health, safety and energy applications. Working with Dr. Malte, the company is developing and testing a fuel injection component for a diesel and natural gas-based fuel processor to supply hydrogen for electrical generation - creating a power production technology that can use the nation's current fuel distribution infrastructure to provide a clean, quiet and energy-efficient electrical energy generating system.

    Saint-Gobain Crystals & Detectors, Washougal
    Researcher: Albert E. Segall, WSU Dept. of Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering
    Saint-Gobain is a leading supplier of sapphire substrates, a favored material used as a substrate for blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers. Their project will develop a process to optimize production of high quality sapphire wafers, reducing manufacturing time while meeting tightened quality requirements.

    Awards in Computer Systems

    SuperTel Technologies, Inc., Redmond
    Researcher: Ming-Ting Sun, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
    SuperTel designs and develops wireless voice and data communications products for commercial and business applications. They are teaming with UW researchers to investigate and implement Wireless Local Loop (WLL), a technology that uses fixed or mobile radio transceivers to provide telephone services. WLL is an alternative to telephone lines or cellular services, which are costly and sometimes difficult to install and maintain.

    Flat Spin Media, LLC, Spokane
    Researcher: Michael Hendryx, WSU-Spokane, Health Policy and Administration
    Flat Spin Media, an information technology-based hardware and software development company, is developing an electronic touchscreen notebook device for data collection. The company is collaborating with Dr. Hendryx to design a mental health survey application for their device. This technology can help health care system providers survey clients rapidly, efficiently and confidentially, thus enhancing their clinical management and accountability.

    Awards in Biotechnology / Biomedical Devices

    Avista Utilities, Spokane
    Researcher: Gustavo V. Barbosa-Canovas, WSU Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering
    Dr. Barbosa-Canovas is collaborating with Avista, a natural gas and electricity utility, and Inland Northwest Dairies to develop an augmented milk pasteurization process using pulsed electric fields to obtain a product of better quality and longer shelf life. Energy requirements are expected to be significantly less than the requirements of competing processes.

    GenPrime, Inc., Spokane
    Researcher: Jim Fleming, EWU Dept. of Biology
    GenPrime, a biotech company, has developed and is selling test kits for determining microbe concentrations in the cultured dairy and brewing industries. Funds will support generating a new rapid test for raw milk, which will alert farmers to contaminated milk within minutes - rather than after the milk has gone to the dairy processor.

    La Haye Laboratories, Inc., Redmond
    Researcher: Boon P. Chew, WSU Dept. of Animal Sciences
    La Haye Labs is a developer, manufacturer and marketer of natural pharmaceutical, nutritional or dietary supplement products intended primarily for humans. Their latest product is astaZANTHIN™, an all-natural antioxidant that has shown promise in many areas including cardiovascular diseases, dermatology and cancer. Antioxidants are thought to prevent certain types of cell damage associated with artery disease and aging, but their usefulness has not been proved. Project funds will help support studies of the product's possible immune-enhancing activity, a step that is necessary for the product to be accepted as a nutritional or dietary supplement.

    Micronics, Redmond
    Researcher: Albert Folch, UW Dept. of Bioengineering
    Micronics is a leading developer of microfluidics-based solutions for application in life science (genomics), in-vitro medical diagnostics and analytical chemistry markets. Their proprietary technologies enable companies to perform chemical analyses faster, less expensively and with less complexity. Dr. Folch will collaborate with Micronics to develop a unique microfluidic device that will generate a large number of different mixtures by combining a few input compounds.

    Molecular Kinetics, Inc., Pullman
    Researcher: A. Keith Dunker, WSU School of Molecular Biosciences
    Molecular Kinetics is a biotech company that markets equipment used for experiments aimed at understanding protein structure and function. With the recent completion of the DNA sequencing of the Human Genome Project, researchers are now looking to ascertain functions for the 35,000+ proteins in the human genome - opening avenues to improve all areas of human life. This project will focus on developing software tools for prediction and identification of regions of order and disorder in proteins.

    RationalDiagnostics, LLC, Seattle
    Researcher: Daniel E. Sabath, UW Dept. of Laboratory Medicine
    RationalDiagnostics is a startup clinical genomics company whose goal is to develop novel diagnostic tools based on the discovery of disease-specific genes. The company is currently focusing on identifying genes whose patterns of expression distinguish different types of B cell lymphomas and developing a highly sensitive lymphoma diagnostic tool. Better diagnostic tools are expected to improve the management of lymphoma patients and may yield molecular targets useful for developing new drug treatments.

    Awards in Optical Systems

    ALL-OPTICAL DEVICES

    Washington State University
    Researcher: Alexander D.Q. Li, Dept. of Chemistry
    Current optical fiber technology is hampered by some network protocols that require optical fiber signals to be processed electronically. Developing all optical, fiber optic-based devices can be much more cost-effective and bandwidth (capacity) efficient. This project will explore synthesizing new organic electro-optic materials that are critical for polymer optical fiber devices in ultra-high speed telecommunications.

    OPTICAL SWITCHES

    University of Washington
    Researcher: Daniel T. Chiu, Dept. of Chemistry
    There is an urgent need for high-speed and high-density optical switches to handle the ever-increasing demand of internet and telephone traffic. The current state-of-the-art switching device has a switching speed in the range of milliseconds. This project will develop laser-induced switches, which can potentially enable speeds in the nano- to microsecond range.

    University of Washington
    Researcher: Alex K.-Y. Jen, Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
    This project will develop low cost, high speed, wide bandwidth, low loss, and low power consumption electro-optic polymer materials for optical switch and modulators used in computing and telecommunications applications.

    Related WTC links:

  • RTD Grant Program

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  • MesoSystems' new "smart" coatings collect deadly airborne pathogens

    For Immediate Release: March 24, 2000

    WTC sponsors research in biological warfare detection systems

    Seattle - MesoSystems, a Richland, Wash. biotechnology, company has teamed with Buddy Ratner, UW Bioengineered Materials Program, to develop thermally responsive "smart" coatings for an air sampler that collects airborne pathogens such as anthrax for rapid detection. WTC established the research partnership and is funding the project through its MEMS Initiative.

    MesoSystems, Inc. released the device, Realtime BioCapture™, on the market a few months ago. When used with Mesosystems' companion product, RealTime BioSensor™, the system is capable of detecting the presence of disease-causing microbes in minutes.

    Originally created for the military, BioCapture equips emergency responders such as police, firefighters and medical personnel to respond to biological terrorist attacks. "Current methods for detecting airborne pathogens take at least 24 hours because the air samples need to be incubated," says Chuck Call, President of MesoSystems. "BioCapture is an important new product for emergency responders because it reduces the amount of time personnel spend inside the hot zone." The device is currently being field tested by fire departments in major metropolitan areas, including the City of Seattle. Other uses for the product include monitoring for airborne infections in hospitals and microbiological hazards in meat packing facilities

    New coatings being developed will enhance the air sampler's efficiency in collecting, concentrating and isolating pathogens. At room temperature, pathogens stick to the coatings, like flies to fly paper. When heated, the pathogens separate from the coating for analysis. Established in 1998, MesoSystems has grown from two to 24 people, and predicts 100% revenue growth this year. Their primary markets are military and civilian defense, medical and public health markets.

    Related WTC links:

  • MesoSystems is a WTC client

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  • New material meets need for microwave communications

    Microwave communications systems offer high-speed line-of-sight wireless data transmission for applications such as mobile telephony products, satellite broadcasting and defense communications. Components of the vacuum tubes that generate microwaves contain beryllia (BeO), which was recently listed as a hazardous material by the Environmental Protection Agency. That classification has necessitated the development of an alternative material.

    Sienna Technologies, Inc. (STI), Woodinville, had developed a ceramic material based on aluminum nitride (AlN) that could substitute for BeO, but the company lacked the equipment and technology to test the material's performance under microwave frequencies. STI teamed with Yasuo Kuga, UW Electrical Engineering Dept., on an FTI project that would accomplish this objective.

    "Timing was everything on this project," says Ender Savrun, president of STI. "Professor Kuga and his team came through beautifully for us. Not only did we get access to equipment we needed, but Kuga came up with a measuring technique that validated our product."

    The company realized sales from the product before the project was officially over, including a $600,000 contract with the Navy to develop vacuum tube components for defense communications. The Navy also contributed $100,000 toward Kuga's efforts to make the measurement technique user-friendlier.

    Company growth has been another result of the project. A six-person company at the start of the project, STI recently hired two more employees and plans to add two more within the next three months. According to Savrun, "This is only the beginning."
    Related WTC links:

  • Sienna Technologies, Inc. is a WTC client

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  • LizardTech focuses on high-resolution images for wireless networks

    LizardTech, Seattle, is a developer of image compression software that gives users the ability to reduce the file size of large images by as much as 40 to 1 with no loss of resolution. This compression utility, called MrSID, allows image managers the flexibility to store and distribute images through a variety of channels including local computer networks or over the Internet. Current markets for the product are geospatial imagery such as maps and aerial photography, publishing, and health care imagery.

    WTC is funding an FTI project between LizardTech and Eve Riskin, UW Electrical Engineering Dept., to conduct research that would enable the software to transmit digital images over wireless networks. With this added functionality, users could view images on wireless hand-held devices such as Palm Pilots, cell phones, and other wireless communications products. Currently, because the rates of wireless data transmission are so much slower than wired links, graphics can't be transmitted to wireless devices. "The forward error correction technique we apply aims to maximize the expected signal-to-noise ratio of the image under a model of packet loss on the communication channel," says Eve Riskin. "The goal is that the first few passes of the image are received quickly, even in the event of extreme data loss. This will enable a useful image to be reconstructed right away and will prevent stalling."

    This project is part of LizardTech's overall plan to enter the e-commerce and consumer markets. LizardTech, a 70-person company, estimates that 20 new jobs will be created as a result of the project.

    Related WTC links:

  • LizardTech is a WTC client

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  • From saving salmon to advances in aircraft manufacturing -- six Wash. companies receive funding from WTC for product development

    For Immediate Release: December 14, 1999

    Seattle - Washington Technology Center (WTC) has awarded $488,000 to six Washington-based companies teamed with university researchers through WTC's Research and Technology Development Program (RTD). The RTD program matches companies with university researchers to conduct product research & development on behalf of the company. The ultimate goal is to help the company grow and create jobs for the people of Washington state. This round, the projects range from developing a device that measures the movement of gravel in streambeds, to projects that will lower manufacturing costs and improve safety of aircraft, to the optimization of new point-of-care diagnostic equipment.

    Projects were split evenly between Washington State University and the University of Washington. However, WSU received the lion's share of funding with a total of $260,000.

    The Research and Technology Development Program awards between $1–2 million per year to industry/university research collaborations that have commercial potential. The WTC has a call for proposals for the RTD program every six months.

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    WTC awards 1999 research and technology development projects

    Washington's technology-based companies are getting a boost in their R&D;, thanks to the technical assistance and funding provided by Washington Technology Center (WTC). In July 1999, WTC awarded over $1.4 million in R&D; funding to 14 company / university research teams through its Research & Technology Development (RTD) Program. The RTD program is one of three WTC funding mechanisms that helps companies develop, refine, or test new products using the expertise of research at the state's universites.

    This year's round of projects aims to make advances in areas as diverse as bloodless surgery, patented nutraceuticals, and rocket science. A summary of these collaborations is featured below.

    Company partners have projected product revenues generated by these projects to exceed $300 million by 2002, and that more than 400 high tech jobs will created by 2004.

    Effective in 1999, the RTD program will be offered twice per year. Proposals are beings solicited now for the next round of RTD projects which will be awarded in December 1999.

    Awards in Biotechnology / Biomedical Devices

    EKOS Corporation, Bothell
    Researcher: Lawrence Crum, UW Applied Physics Lab
    EKOS is a medical device company founded in 1995 to commercialize ultrasound technology for therapeutic use. The company's first product is an ultrasound-tipped catheter that could accelerate the effectiveness of blood clot dissolving drugs. The focus of this project will be to determine the physical characteristics of microbubbles that enhance the ultrasound mediated dissolution of blood clots.

    MCD Technologies, Inc., Tacoma
    Researcher: Juming Tang, WSU Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering
    MCD Technologies manufactures novel food drying systems based on its patented Refractance Window(tm) technology which can dry food products such as fruits, vegetables and herbs in a few minutes as opposed to several hours for conventional food drying methods, and with better food quality. The focus of this project will be to study application methods to optimize the Refractance Window(tm) drying systems with a wider variety of foods.

    Decagon Devices, Inc., Pullman
    Researcher: Dr. Markus Flury, WSU Dept. of Crop & Soil Sciences
    Decagon Devices, Inc., manufactures and markets instruments for food quality testing and environmental research. Their current customer list is 80% of the top 100 food companies in the U.S. This research project will further develop a prototype instrument that measures the freezing characteristics of hydrated foods, soils, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics.

    Applied Phytologics, Inc., Pullman
    Researcher: Diter von Wettstein, WSU Dept. of Crop & Soil Sciences
    Applied Phytologics is a plant-based life science company. Using plant genetics technology, the researcher and company will develop a new strain of barley grain to be grown in Washington state that can be used as chicken feed for broiler chickens. Currently, Washington imports corn as the primary source of feed at significant cost; yet barley is among the top ten agricultural commodities grown in the state. If successful, this project will benefit both barley farmers and chicken growers in Washington.

    Söliv, Seattle
    Researcher: Robert Waaland, UW Dept. of Botany
    Söliv, a Seattle start-up, has discovered and created a new, high value skin care product from seaweed indigenous to the Puget Sound region. The project proposes to adapt and improve intensive cultivation methods developed at the UW in order to grow this marine plant on a commercial scale. The seaweed will be used as an ingredient in skin care products to be marketed to spas as a nutraceutical.

    Therus Corporation, Seattle
    Researcher: Peter Kaczkowski, UW Applied Physics Lab
    Using UW technology, Therus Corporation aims to further the development of a hand-held surgical wand that uses high-intensity ultrasound (HIFU) to stop internal bleeding and to selectively kill abnormal tissue within the body without having to make an incision. The "TheraStat" device delivers ultrasound to a targeted site within the body at a level of 1,000 times higher than that used for diagnostic purposes. Initial uses for the surgical instrument include stopping bleeding caused by trauma or injuries, and for controlling bleeding during surgery.

    Saigene Corporation, Redmond
    Researcher: Bruce Darling, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
    Saigene is a biotech start-up specializing in DNA probe based diagnostics. This research project proposes to generate a food and water pathogen detection procedure that can test for disease causing bacteria in less than one hour. Current methods for testing foods can take up to 7 days, requiring that fresh foods be held during this process, thereby diminishing the freshness of the final delivered product.

    Awards in Computer Systems

    Argo Technical Publishing, Inc., Spokane
    Researcher: Steven Simmons, EWU Dept. of Computer Science
    Argo Technical Publishing has been publishing technical documentation and distance learning courseware in electronic formats since 1993. This project will produce a new software utility that adds two-way voice interaction to their multi-media CD-ROM products, to be used for training, documentation and reference in industrial environments. An example of how this system could be used would be to transmit images & instruction to an emergency response team member on the correct response for an acid spill while en route to a tank truck accident.

    IST-Quadtek, Inc., Redmond
    Researcher: Jeng-Neng Hwang, UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering
    IST-Quadtek offers a unique video camera / pyrometer (thermometer) system for monitoring conditions inside hot environments such as industrial furnaces. This project will develop an advanced real-time image enhancement PC board to enhance the image quality for their product that provides video monitoring of cement kiln processes. The challenge is to present clear pictures of dirty environments - where current video imaging systems fail.

    Awards in Advanced Materials & Manufacturing

    Hovair Systems, Inc., Seattle
    Researcher: Brian Fabien, UW Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
    Hovair Systems designs and manufactures material transport systems, primarily for heavy industrial applications. The new WTC project will address the structural, vibration and electronic controller issues required to reduce the cycle time for the Hovair Lift & Carry Tower Systems for automobile assembly-line use.

    Mikron Industries, Inc., Kent
    Researcher: Vipin Kumar, UW Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
    Mikron supplies extruded plastic profiles for use by the vinyl window and door industry. The project will implement a novel microcellular plastic processing technique developed at the UW to reduce polyvinyl chloride material consumption, while increasing the insulating properties and structural strength of the company's products.

    Radiant Optics, Inc., Woodinville
    Researcher: Thomas Stoebe, UW Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
    Radiant Optics manufactures a unique and highly efficient heater which delivers focused heat within a designated area. This project will design a ceramic heating element to replace a more conventional metal element to increase reliability and efficiency of the spot heater.

    Related WTC links:

  • RTD Grant Program

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